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Clearfield Progress Newspaper Archive: August 20, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Clearfield Progress

Location: Clearfield, Pennsylvania

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   Progress, The (Newspaper) - August 20, 1962, Clearfield, Pennsylvania                               First With The News Of Clearfield County And Moshannon Valley THE PROGRESS Warm and Humid warm, humid today, to- night and Tuesday; scattered thunder- showers. High Tuesday 85 to 94. Low tonight 65 to 74. Sunrise: Sunset: Vol. 56 No. 196 Our 52nd Year Clearfield, Curwensville, Philipsburg, Moshannon Valley, Pa., Monday, August 20, 1962 Copies Daily 12 PAGES TODAY CLEARFIELD CEREMONIES Clearfield County Judge John J. Pentz (bottom picture) gives principal address at ceremonies at the Driving Park yesterday as the Clearfield area of- ficially welcomed home its U. S. Army Reservists from 10 months of active duty. Top pic- ture is a general view of the speaking platform with the Clearfield Community Band and the Clearfield John Lewis Shade Post 6 American Legion Color Guard in the foreground. Army Reservists State To Check Welcomed Home Handling Of In Park Pr ogram Traffic Fines I uApmcnnnr: fAPi__TVn HARRISBURG Corn- Reservists "We welcome you home monwealth will conduct a state- v.ith the added pleasure that all'wide investigation to learn if local left have returned, safe and officials are downgrading traffic whole, and that what might have violations and withholding fines Berliners Protest Red Wall Demonstrators Stone Russians, Americans, Even Own Police By CARL HARTMAN BERLIN (AP) Mayor Willy Brandt today ordered West Berlin police to crack down on rioters "with the necessary vigor" after wild weekend demonstrations at the Red wall brought attacks on Americans as well as Soviets. East and West Berlin police also were involved in the melees. Brandt appealed for calm in a ra- dio speech. Thousands of angry West Ber- liners marched, shouted and threw stones at Soviets, Americans, the wall, East German border guards and their own police Sunday. Huge slingshots were used to hurl tear gas grenades from the Communist side. The rioting was to prote; shooting by East Berlin borrj guards of a young refugee to escape Friday. He was le die slowly on the East side wall while American troop; West police watched fron other side. Maj. Gen. Albert Watson, U.S. commandant, disclosed Soviet command had refused invitation to discuss the increased tension with American, British and French commandants at U.S. headquarters. Watson had offered to lift a ban on the Soviet com- mandant visiting the U.S. sector. Young West Berliners best available estimates put their num- ber at about into the early morning hours. A young redhead, who was not identified, spoke through the loud- speaker of a West Berlin police truck. The truck was escorted by about 500 demonstrators from NG State Sen. Jo Hays of State College and former assembly- jBois (wearing glasses) are set to turn the first shovel full of dirt urday to mark the official start of a flood control proj- ts and Waters Secretary Maurice K. Goddard is at the left and jperintendent of the Al Monzo Construction Co. which has the con- beside Dr. Goddard. Others are unidentified. (Progress P'hoto) Smallpox Contacts Sought Young Canadian Boy Traveled Through New York City By ANDREW MEISELS NEW YORK offi- cials of two nations worked against an awesome deadline to- day to find and vaccinate all per- sons who may have come in con- tact with a young Canadian' small- pox victim. The stricken boy, James Wil- liam Orr, 14, flew here from Sao Paolo, Brazil, Aug. 11 on a with more than 80 other persons, including his parents and a broth- er and sister. He passed through Idlewild Airport, traveled by cab to Grand Central Terminal and sat in the i huge station's waiting room for 8Vz hours before boarding a train I for Toronto. In Toronto the boy, described by his missionary father as feeling "under the was taken to a doctor and eventually to Clearfieid based Headquarters and Headquarters Battery of the 4th Howitzer Battalion, 92nd Artil- lery, U. S. Army Reserves, with representatives from 23 communi- ties of Clearfield and adjoining Deborah's short greetings wasj rjeputy Atty. Gen. Edward counties, were welcomed home a highlight of the program. In who will direct the Continued on Page 10, Column 3 been never took place." from the state. from 10 months of active duty in an impressive ceremony at the Clearfield Driving Park yesterday. I The welcoming crowd was muchi too small for the occasion, but the upwards of 400 to 500 area resi-j dents who turned out heard speak- ers who left no doubt about the, debt that the area owes the Ro- servists who left their jobs and family in answer to their coun- try's call to duty. And the 84 offi- cers and enlisted men of the Bat- Continued on Page 10, Column 1 ICC, PUC Open Public Hearing On PRR Wreck New Radiation Belt Reported Around Earth BOULDER, Colo. new and perhaps menacing radiation belt is in the atmosphere around the earth put there, scientists revenue and by a United States high-al- probe, said over the weekend that the Justice Department has heard j of such practices in the state and "it's got to stop." inyesjUgation stems from the inquiry by two state depart- ments into enforcement of traffic violations in Bethel Park Borough outside of Pittsburgh. Following investigations by the partments, Bethel Park officials were accused of downgrading vio- Contmued on Page 10, Column 7 HARRISBURG (AP, Circum- plain but sincere words that they stances surrounding the derail- are "welcome home" once again. ment of Pennsylvania Railroad Little Deborah Mitchell, nine- baseball special which killed 19 year-old daughter of Sgt First Class last July 28 at Steelton Robert L. Mitchell, speaking for ccme under state and federal the Reservists' children, said it scrutiny today. this way: "In the name of all your The Interstate Commerce Corn- children, I welcome you back." [mission and the Public Utility AM, If ill Judge John J. Pentz, principal Commission has begun a public HI VIIC3ICI Hill speaker on the program, told the hearing into the accident that in- Heavy Safe Taken from Office titudde nuclear test blast July 9. Little is known of the new belt Swim, Admirers Rush In Too By JAMES. BACON LOS ANGELES (AP) Presi- dent Kennedy, weekending here, de- cided to take a swim in the Pa- cific and was almost swamped by a throng of admirers. Bystanders walked into the sea fully clothed as the President strode into the ocean in front of the Santa Monica beach home of his brother-in-law, Peter Lawford. It happened Sunday during the President's 33-hour visit to South- ern California, a flying trip which ended shortly before midnight when the presidential jet took off to return to Washington, D.C. j The President arrived in Wash-j ington at 8 a.m. EOT today. K had been billed as a non-poli- tical trip, although the President obviously helped Democratic Gov. Brown when Sa Ground Is Broken For Irvona Flood Control Project IRVONA Ground was broken at ceremonies here Saturday af- ternoon for a flood control project along Clearfield Creek and Witmer Run. State Forests and Waters Secretary Maurice K. Goddard hailed i the project as "one of several important flood protection measures for the people living along Clearfield Creek and its tributaries." Dr. Goddard, the principal speaker, said "It will afford valuable protection from high water throughout the borough along the two streams which run through Irvona." Completion date for the work, for which Al Monzo Construction Co. of Monroeville has been awarded the controct, is late next year. Canadian hospital. Canadian authorities said the boy's illness was virtually certain to be smallpox, although confirm- ing tests were still to be made. U.S. Public Health offi- cials said there was no doubt. It was the first confirmed case of smallpox in the United States since 1947, they said. The development left New York City with the staggering task of running down all who may have come in contact with the boy here. The city health department set up 12 vaccination centers in Man- Continued en Page 10, Column 7 The company already is at work on the project and is employing Dilworth Asks Scranton's Plan On State Payroll tral Californ The Pres1, Boy on Bicycle, Two Girls Injured In Rood Mishaps ljured some 100 person. CHESTER HILL Burglars got away with a 700-pound safe some- rrn. i. 1 i 1 i. aJ 1H1 Cl I O Mlt- The hearing is expected to last'tune dunng the night or early at least two days. The rai.road has officially listed c morning from the office of Meyers trie cause of the accident as a misaligned section of track. Three A official stated that safe contained approximately cars, the only ones carrying pas- cash ,ed tjtl and home, to and enjoy except: 1. It could imperil astronauts in future space flights, and hence Un-law sp< might cause the United Slates to lounging r, delay its Project Mercury pro- gram. 2. It emits radio frequency sig- nals and therefore may interfere with some radio astronomy. The presence of the radiation belt, 600 miles and higher above the earth, was disclosed by Dr. James Warwick of the University of Colorado's high-altitude observ- atory, in a copyright article by science writer Victor Cohn of the Minneapolis Sunday Tribune. Dr. Warwick's comments were Ex-Hungarian Dictator Ousted Red Party ST, Hungary By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Democrat Richardson Dilworth 10-hour shifts to take advantage has challenged his Republican op- of the present favorable weather. ponent for governor, William W. The contract -calls for dredging scranton, to say "just he feet of channel in Clearfield has in inind, if anything, on re- Creek from its confluence with'ducing state payrolls." Witmer Run and also some drsdg-j jn a statement Sunday in Phila- ing on the Witmer Run. I delphia Dilworth said Scranton Levees will be constructed along i has claimed "obsolescence and a section of Clearfield'duplication" in state government, Creek and along the right bank of and is "guilty of making asser- Witmer Run for feet. About tions without having evidence to 900 feet of Legislative Route 17019! back thorn up.'' will also have to be relocated. in another statement issued in Dr. Goddard said the dam at Harrisburg he accused Scranton kosi, Hungary's former i prince Gallitzin State Park adopting parts of the Demo- id 24 of his Malmist bordering Cambria County will "Program For Prosperity ave been booted fromlreduce the threat of floods Three persons injured in traffic accidents over the week- end including a Curwensville (liuan 19 ftTS At who was hospitalized after his l5 J MI bicycle was struck by a car Satur- 1 paff0n day afternoon. Gary Kavala, 9, son of Mr. and PATTON, Pa. Free doses Continued on Page 10, Column 4 j other valuable papers. _______________ To take the safe, burglars hadj to move it a distance of some 150 Continued on Page 10, Column 2 PnllA Vfirf II1P feet to load it onto a truck from a ITOmOted Colonel At The safe had to be wheeled from j its location under the counter in 'the main office, into a side office, vjtaiv ixdvdm, y. .oiiu Mrs. M.chael Kavala, Susquehan- of Sabin oral polio vaccine public space through na avenue, Curwensville, is listed administered to residents of Je mam office through the door in satisfactory condition with a Northern Cambria County over Between the office and shop, and fractured left leg in the Clearfield the weekend in this community of the ramp to where it could Hospital this morning. site of the state's first ,be Continued on Page 10, Column 2 Curwensvile Patrolman Richard polio fatality of 1962. Olson said witneses told him that; State and county health au- the boy drifted onto the road from thorities conducted an immuniza- a sidewalk. He was knocked from his bicycle by a car driven Richard Mosley, 26, of Madera1 R D., at 3.30 p.m., police said.! Two Ramey girls, Mary Ellen S1-- Hock, 23 and Shirley Bartek, 23, were injured at o'clock los1 night when their car ran off the road and struck an abutment between Janesvile and Ramey. The two girls were taken to the was scratch- the heavy piece was ed where rolled. It is believed that four men and a truck would have been required to handle the safe. County Farmers Jo tlect Ten ASC Committees Ballots will be mailed to Clear- field County farmers in the near future for use in the election of ten Agricultural Stabilization and Conservation community commit- tees, Joseph D. Young, chairman of the Clearfield County ASC Commit- A C earfield man was one of t animinced today. four U.S. Army Reserve officers To be elected are tnree reguiai. to be promoted recently by Presi-Lcommittee members and two alter- dent Kennedy at the 2210th U.S. nales for each committee. The _ _ DUBOIS Army Garrison at DuBois. The President announced, through the Department of the as delegate and alternate delegate, Army and the Commanding Gen- eral, Second U. S. Army, the ad- Continued on Page 10, Column 4 Driftwood Citizens, Pa. Health Dept. Seek Relief From Wire Burning Fumes chairman and vice-chairman of the elected committees will also serve 
                            

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