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Chester Times Newspaper Archive: October 29, 1946 - Page 2

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   Chester Times (Newspaper) - October 29, 1946, Chester, Pennsylvania                              '7 TUESBAY, OCTOBER 29, 1946 CHESTER (PA.) TIMES VTTALROLE IN ELECTION SEEN FOR GOP WOMEN The Chester Council of Republican Women were told Monday night they could play a vital role in Uie Nov. 5 election by working for and voting straight Republican ticket. -11 aerted that the 3 tnf Martin administration .JusU- fied I their efforts in behalf of all Re- publican candidates. Mrs Carroll, vice chairman of the State Republican Committee, re- caUed that when Pennsylvania Dem- were removed from office eight ago the administration left by the Executive OUlce Z-16IJ Wednesday, October 30th Central Boys' organized games. 4 to 9 p. m. Sr. and Jr boxing, 5 p. rn. Football practice 6 p. m. Chester Boys' room ac- tivities and playground activities Jr. .gym activities 6 p. m. Sr. gym activities, 7 p. m. Girl meeting at th m beh'nd a tremendous dsot. This deficit, she added, has been from the taxpayers by two sue ve Republican administrations, since the advent of Governor aro Martin and Attorney Gen- e H. Duff at Harrisbure a has been created. Directing her remarks principally to 'he women, Mrs. Carroll blamed scarcities and high prices on the Washington administration wnlca, sne charged, has brought conditions about by inept handling of national problems. meeting was presided over b> Mrs. Frances Donahoo, council presl YWCA at T.30 p. m. Robert Wade Neighborhood Pre-school 9 to 12 noon. Jr. ac tivilies 3.30 to 7 rn., Teen-Ag dance. DEATH OF FIRE CHIEF LAID TO !UN OIL BLAZE The toll of the Sun OH disaster ose to 11 thLs_ morning when ti oroner's jury ruled that Injuries eceived there on Oct. 3 were di- ectly attributable to the death of Nicholas J. Marcus Hook 'ire Company chief. A "blue ribbon" pane) rendered Ls verdict after hearing testimony a 90-minute inquest in the Munl- ipal Building ut Marcus Hook. ,v; jurors were assembled by Deputy Coroner Maxwell )Ut the inquest was conducted bj Coroner Roy Blackburn. Mr Barnett, who sustained burn and Injuries at the refinery blaze died Tuesday, Oct. 22, as he wa> being rushed to Chester Hospital ii the Marcus Hook ambulance afte suffering a heart attack at lit CSoiiier speakers were E- Wallace Republican nominee fo Corigre'ss; Louis A. Bloom, Cheste candidate for state legislature, ha Honan. city chairman of th committee. ELKS 'LUGS' IN ANNUAL MEETING The national convention of the Loyal Order of Lugs. Elks' was held at the Elks home, Chester, on Saturday and Sunday, with delegates from all parts of the United States. Chester Chapter "Big Lug" Harry Walters made the welcome address. National "Big Lug" Bill Ferguson, of Boston, Mass., was succeeded by Hurry Coslet, of Maryland. Ferguson was presented with a ring and wrist home. Dr. John H. Turner, of Glenolden a coroner's physician, performed ai autopsy immediately and .said deatl was caused by a coronary occlusion The jury concurred In this opln ion, but hold that the burns an shock previously sustained by >1 Barnett was "contributory factors to liti sudden death. The victim was given first ala i treatment after, lie was hurt i returned to the fire. Complication.-! developed later and he was admitted to Hospital on Oct. 5. He was released 12 days later and was convalescing at home at the time of death. Junkman Summoned By House Surplus Group Washington (UP) Phillip Ballis. Philadelphia junk dealer, was asked to tell the House Sur- plus Property Investigating. Committee today how he was able to buy C43 surplus tractor parts, valued at each, for only S8.80 apiece. Bailis, representing the firm of Max Baills and Sons, was the successful bidder for tractor power control units sold through the Philadelphia Regional Of- fice of the Government's War Assets Corp. WAC is now the Assets Administration. CURTIS PLANT PLANS TOLD TO CHESTER ROTARY Curtis Publishing Company's building in Sharon Hill will hav a length of 1200 feet, width of 40 feet and will be built on two levels Details of the plans, which hav Just been approved, were announce at a meeting of Chester's Rotary a the Chester Club at noon today. Don Brennan, company repre sensitive, guest of the club, sa' VESSEL, LOADED WITH SUGAR, AT HOOK ANCHORAGE A ship full of bags Methoi r 3371 tons of anchored at elated, ic Murcus Hook, anchorage today. Jound for Philadelphia from Cuba, ic-liuge cargo of the scarce food is cmporarily stopped in mid-river by he post-strike shipping jam in the ort of Philadelphia. The ship carrying the hard-to-get ai'ijo is the American cargo ship Ucnas. It arrived here this morn- ng from Puerto Tarafa, Cuba, and vlll wait until a pier assignment is available in the Quaker City port. The cargo is consigned to the 'ennsylvanla Sugar Refineries in Philadelphia, a branch of the Na- tional Sugar Refineries. It is ex- pected that the ship will be held in nerc for several days. Agent for the ship is the United Fruit Lines. Meanwhile, the jam of ships stalled at the anchorage of the bor- ough during the 28-day strike ended Sunday, continued to break-up as crewmen went back to work. Hueber's Launch Service, Delaware avenue and Church street, Marcus Hook, was kept busy all day Monday ferrying crew members back to the .ships they had left during the pro- OBITUARIES FKANK P. CARR The funeral ot Prank P. Carr, Sr., 91, was held from his late residence 251 Leamy avenue, Springfield, on Saturday afternoon. Rev. John Mc- Elroy, minister at the Community Methodist Church, Springfield, ofli- 'ated. Interment was at Arlington Ceme- tery. Pallbearers were: Weldon Morrow, William Haren, Franklin Pancoast, Samuel Levis, William Morrow and Samuel Levls, Jr. Mi. Carr died Oct. 21, after a two- weeks' illness. He was widely- known in Delawares county. He was born in Springfield, the son of the late William Carr and Mary Ann THOMAS M. LUKENS Funeral services for Thomas M. Lukens, 63, of 403 South Fourth street, Colwyn, will be held on Wednesday afternoon at two MRS. MATILDA M. WATT Mrs. Matilda M. Watt, of Le Hann Circle, Springfield, who observed her. ninety-fifth birthday In the sprin died on Friday evening, Oct. 25, a yy CLiii vCVlciy unw v> o'clock from the funeral home of ter an illness of three days. Charles H. Drewes, 920 Main street, was the first time Mrs. Watt had Darby. Rev. Robert Lamont, pastor ever been ill in her long life, of the Darby Presbyterian Church Watt, who was born in Tre- will officiate. Burial will be in Ar-............ lington Cemetery. Friends may call this evening. Parsons Carr. Prior to his retire- ment, he was a contractor and builder. He had been confined to his home for four years due to in- firmities of age. Mr. Carr was a members of Ked- ron Methodist Church, Morton, and when able he was active In the Church work and the Sunday school. He was a member of the P. O. S. of A'. Mr. Carr's survivors are one c.on, Prank P. Carr, Jr., of Springfield; Mrs. Elsie Lewis, of Springfield; Mrs. Bessie Morrow, of Gradyville, Mr. Lukens, who died on Satur- day in Lankenau Hospital, Phila- delphia, after an illness of nine days, was a retired Darby business man, having operated a fruit and produce business and also a grocery store in the borough for many years. He had been a resident of Darby and Colwyn for 50 years, and was a lifetime member of the Darby Presbyterian Church. He was a member of the Cohvyn Fire Com- pany for over 40 years; Prospect Lodge No. 578, P. and A. M., and Bartram Assembly, A.O.M.P. His survivors-are: his widow. Elsie Gantz Lukens; two sons, Thomas W., Jr., of Pittsburgh, and B. El- liot, of Philadelphia; three grand- land, had lived with her son in Springfield, for the past 22 years. Her husband, Robert M. Watt, died in 1914. They had been married shortly after Mrs. Watt came to this country, when she was 17. They lived in Philadelphia until hls_ death. A member Church, of at the Oak Fifty-first Park and U.P. Pine railroad tracks will bracket the longed strike. And this morning, only eight of the ships that were stalled railroad iracits win DIUUK.UI. huge building, delivering raw ma- here for long periods remained ac terials on one side and hauling the anchorage. away finished copies of Curtis pub- lications on the other. One of these, the Charles Hall, was scheduled to leave this afternoon In addition to Dr. Turner, others who testified at the Inquest were: Dr. William Russell Levis, chief surgeon at Hospital; Paul Woodrow, a first aid man at Sim Oil and Clarence Vernon, Marcus Alrlch Pr'ce also were on received a traveling bag. j _ _ 1 speakers' platform. The following officers were elected: dav will Others were expected to move either to thP il bfturned roduction of n- up and Edith Cavr, of Springfield, daughters. Nine grandchildren also survive. Relations and friends called Fri- day evening. MRS. FLORENCE M. GAEHRING Funeral services for Mrs. Florence May Gaehring, who died at her home, 914 Seventh avenue, Prospect Park, on Sunday, will be held at the Griffith Funeral Chapel, Norwood, on Thursday afternoon at 1.30. Ser- vices will be held in St. James' iiv to thP roucon of theirs aboard this freighter are mem- ?nh Hnv FvlnlnL Past now tors of a west coast union which Saturday t osi, wnii.ii nowr ___ Issues copies a week. at 11 not completed strike set notiations. 1 Continued From Page One 1 Maryland; "Big __ Ffirnan, of Philadelphia; Treasurer Lyndhurst, N. Buck Wilson, of Historian -The Jurors were: Rev. G. Harold Hill, pastor of Marcus Hook Baptist 'Church, who served as foreman; Fd Mary M. Campbell, secretary of nil' Marcus Hook School Board; Clyde 11___.. rml Atfn r- wee. niihiirn t tlemcnt negotiations. puoncations, ritiir-v pnvi nf her Poit of ones t -PI, ninr ihe other Ladies Home Journal, Country Gen- tlcman. Jack and Jill and the new shin move- imp move Episcopal Church Prospect Park, at 2.30. Rev. Paul R. R. Relnhardt, the rector, will officiate. Burial will be in Lawncroft Cemetery, Friends may call on Wednesday evening. Mrs. Gaehring, who had been ill children, and a sister, Mrs. Ade- laide Pennock, of Baltimore. MRS BESSIE M TAYLOK Mrs. Bessie M. Taylor, widow of George W. Taylor died in a county hospital on Monday after a linger- ing illness. Mrs. Taylor had been a resident of this city for many years. She is survived by three daugh- ters and two sons: Mrs. Elva Bunker, of Chester; Mrs. Vera Ul- rich, of Chester; Mrs. Hazel De- Kalb, of Rockland, Del.; Woodrow W., of Rockland, and Allen R., of the Merchant Marine. Three sisters, Mrs. Florence L. Webb, Mrs. Cecie Payne and Mrs. Minnie Landing, all of Maryland, streets, In Philadelphia, for 36 years, Mr. Watt was a faithful attender at church services, until about three years ago. However, she did attend church service on Palm Sunday of this year. During both the first and second World Wars, she knitted extensively for British War Relief and was pre- sented with a pin for her service to this organization. She was a Gold Star Mother through the loss of her son, Graham B. Watt, in the first World War, and has been a mem- ber of the Springfield Unit of the American Legion Auxiliary for the past twenty years. She is survived by a brother and sister in Londonderry, Ireland; Mrs. Rebecca Donnell, who is 91 and Robert McCarter, 93; a daughter, _ o- Lynanurst, IN. J.; "IK mawnn nual taxi license fee from to Uugr" Max HuZl of nidgeficld, N. J. Part-time summer licenses for taxi- 0{ governors is as fo Part-time summer c 0 governors s cabs will be increased from to lows: -Lug" Liebtag. of Philadelphia; rHo I tDrttrtu Af "fillir" under the statute. "Lug" Bates, of Chester; "Lug" was the '3 Untied -LUC JDlttUrt, Ul 'The Chester Materials Company Yates of Bristol; "Lug" of for e Ceser ae Yates of Brso; ug the only bidder on mate-rials for Rjdgcflcld Paric_ N_ J-; ..IjUg" paving of Mill street, from Sec- lf phillpsburg, N. J.; "Lug" awarded a Dalton, supervising principal of Mar- cus Hook public schools; Alex Spunn, a retired foreman of American Vis- cose Corporation; Mrs. Bessie Mc- Cnffcrty, a retired school teacher, and William J. Thornton, a borough druggist. the firm, he said, received _an aver- Santo Smith, UI1C I m VJtCKUr J ond to Third, and was awarded a of poitstown; "Lug" Fox, of Frce- contract. Previously, an ord- land N j_; ami ft new appointee, Inance had ben introduced appro- j Tyler, of Chester, priating from the 1945 Ovpr 2fM) lltiendcd the convention loan fund to cover the costs of the which was followed by a clam bake, 'with n. floor show and dancing. of 3 Continued From Page One Borough Hall he assigned by the editors. con- Chile. This ship was at the anchor- during the early days of the waiting to go to the Ford pier. will find an First reading of an ordinance changing a zoning classification on the East Side met with approval and a public hearing will be held on Nov. 8 at 10 a- m.. to hear any objections to the change. If final approval Is rna vy Continued From Puge One to lighten the burdens honor guard awaiting him. Lining the walk will be a bugle corps composed of men who fought In the war and uniformed mem- bers of the borough's special police later.moved up to job from pulp to finished Product. TteDothanVctory The company own-s and operates H own paper mills. tj expected Trie entire county slate will be he company owrts and operates nw Tho' H r i A. oiiiciciir A iic ThlTeaEer was introduced by Sinclair arrived with; a cargo of nnes Lukens. chairman for the crude The Flat _ _ .r rrrmirn flip VOaiS. finished on demolition of the Nac- relli Building at Third and Reany streets. EX-GI COLLAPSES Russell Raezer, 21, of 1209 Honan street, a former serviceman, collapsed at Third and Welsh streets at 8 p. m. Monday. He wns taken to Chester Hospital by the Franklin Rescue s crown over the years. It was left tor William Ward. Jr., former mayor, to add the touch of heart-tugging which he was noted when he was active in united at Swarthmore where T. Jay Sproul and Walter F. Layer, can- for the State Legislature, 'are to wait for the Stassen party. Since It was announced several weeks neo Unit Stassen would vl.sit Delaware County, Interest among the public and party nldcs has been mounting steadily. Guided by this evidence, party leaders have made preparations to accommodate overllow audiences nt both sites. Ycadon Is planning lo handle a larger crowd than the 750 persons who greeted Governor Edward Mar- tin on Oct. 17. Swarthmore. it Is understood, anticipates capacity at- tendance. The auditorium there associated with the Savings and Loan Chester. Mark Dresden, in an announce- ment, urged members to attend the annual meeting of the Boy Scouts on Nov. 16. In another announce- MobUe Bay moved mto the pier for two was 59, and the daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon T Lenhart, of Essington, where his father was proprietor of the Lenhart Hotel. She was a resident of the borough for more than 30 years and was ac- tive in the affairs of St. James' Church, being a member of the aux- iliary. She is survived by her husband. John S.; a son, Arthur L., and a daughter, Mrs. Lyle Hankins. There are three grandchildren, Joan and Carol Gaehring and Karen Han- kins, all of Ridley Farms. A brother, Walter Scott Lenhart, lived with Mrs. Gaehring. There is another brother, Lucien T., and a sister_ Phyllis T. Lenhart. Her stepmother, Mrs. Tevillia Lenhart, resides in Millsboro, Del., and a sister, Eleanor R. Lenhart, lives in Wilmington, Del. also survive. Funeral services will be held on Thursday afternoon at 1 o'clock from the funeral home of Ray F. Imschweiler, 1600 Edgmont avenue. Burial will be in Lawncroft Ceme- tery. Friends may call on Wednes- day evening. MRS. EDITH GRAY Mrs. Edith Entwistle Gray, 67, wife of William R. Gray, of 226 Mrs .Mary Brown of Glasgow, Del., and one son, William Watt, Springfield, with whom she mat her home. She had ten grandchil- dren and eight great-grandchildren. Services will be conducted today at her son's residence, on Le Hann Circle, at 2 p. m., by the Rev. Thomas C. Pollock, pastor of the Oak Park U.P. Church. At the view- Ing on Monday evening, members of the Springfield Unit of the Amer- ican Legion Auxiliary held a service. Interment will be at Femwood Cemetery. oi cruoe on to unload a CYRILLA M. IIDLL which has been company docks tend a luncheon meeting at Chester -YWCA this Thursday hear a discussion on extended use of X-Rays in hospitals. Victory, is not ex- early next week. The untu ea y d -Squad and treatment. returned home after civic aflalrs. He had lost none of his genius for expression. Miss Louise Macfarlanc, long chairman of volunteer special serv- ices who often had been palsed for her' marked ability, told her col- on the board that she was ble to Oinctlon only through the ABE MARTIN nspiration "Miss Lucy" I guess Wes Hanger lias go a purty fine son, fer 1 rend where lie's wanted in Kansas, an' Ohio is tryin' t' hold him. Life's too short t' wait fer a thorough in vestigation. scats 600. This meeting Is sponsored by the Young Republicans of Dela- ware County. Stassen, whose crowded Itinerary precludes an overnight stay, will leave the county after the Swarthmoro rally other will EVICTED, OFFERS THREE CHILDREN A 35-year-old Philadelphia bus driver and his wife, evicted from a ___ _. Both _ here for west coast ports. cargo Continued From Page One Miss Cyrilla M. Holl, daughter of survive, the late Emil and Annie Holl, died Monday night at her home. 309 South avenue, Media, following a two weeks' illness. Miss Holl suffered a heart attack died two hours later. She was a retired music supervisor and formerly taught at Clifton Heights and In Montgomery County. Final rites will be held Thursday morning from the Rigby Funeral Home, 1 West Baltimore avenue, Media. Solemn Requiem Mass will Church street, Moorestown, N. J-, died on Sunday at her home. Mrs. Gray was a'resident of Ches- ter until her marriage 35 years ago, and was a member of the First Pres- byterian Church of Chester. Beside her husband, she is sur- vived by four children: Robert, of Mechanicsbiirg; Russell, of Mont-i clair, N. J.; Mrs. William Brooks, of Wymoor, and Mrs. M. P. H. Wil- son, of Oaklyn, N. J. Two sisters, Mrs. Nellie Pennington of Boothwyn and Mi's. Frank Draper, of Chester, also 7 1948, and on Jan. 1, 1949. The above sums, with the present furnished by "Miss said she deserved ttle ot the credit since whatever iad been accomplished by the local ranch was the work of "devoted ommlttees" nncl she thanked them or the loyalty which they had dis- )layed. Mrs. William Ward. Jr.. who has ervecl on the board since the First Vorld War, in her Blowing tribute ummed up "Miss Lucy's" accom- plishments in the "The Ches- ter Red Cross is Lucy Halhnwny." At the conclusion of his brief homo sold to a war veteran, today sl 75g QQQ the Authority is permitted offered three of their nine children lo' borrow, would provide Swixrlhmoro rally to fulfill nn- to "anyone who will take care of Lne completion of the new water r engagement the next day. He them" after parishioners of their nrograrn, Mr. Dodd explained, remain in the county about six church offered shelter to the eldest Tne calculations are based upon hours. six. paying two per cent Interest on the The invitation lo come here was ir no one comes to their assistance, D0ncis The total amounts borrowed extended on behalf of the Rcpubli- Thomas Walsh, and his wife, 31, of tlecrease as interest rates on bonds l-i.t iirlin d lUiivUnn tOTlVin m I be said at 10 a. m., at the Church of the Nativity, where she was or- ganist for many years. Interment will be In Calvary Cemetery. Surviving are three brothers: Al- bert E., a Media attorney; Herman, of Drexel Hill; Fred, of Parkesburg, Pa.; three sisters: Mrs. John E. Mc- Donough, of this city; Mrs. James W. Regan, of Drexel Hill, and Miss Frances Holl, of Media. Funeral services will be held' on Thursday from her late home at two p. m. Burial will be in Arlington Cemetery, Upper Darby. RALPH ALBERT CLARK, JR. Funeral services for Ralph. Al- bert Clark, Jr., 46, of 108 Cherry street, CSllingdale, will be held Thursday, 2 p. m., from the parlors of Charles H. Drewes, 920 Main street, Darby) Friends may .call "Wednesday eve- ning. Burial will be in Philadelphia Memorial Cemetery. Mr. Clark, who had been employed by the Drewes MRS. RUTH P. ROSS Mrs. Ruth P. Ross, 1710 West Mary street, died at her home on Friday after an illness of about six months. Mrs. Ross, the former Ruth Per- rigan, was born in Chester and had lived here all of her life, except for a short time when she resided in New York. 'She attended Watts School and was a member of St. Daniel's ME Church. She was the daughter of Annie M. and the late John Perrigan. Surviving are her mother, her hus- band, Frank Ross, and her two sons, Henry and Donald, all of Chester; and the following sisters and broth- ers: Howard C. Perrigan of At- lantic City; John Perrigan, Jr., of New York; Mrs. Eva S. Miller, Mrs. Ida R. Davis, Earl D. Perrigan. Mrs. Elva N. Drummor, Frank J. Perri- gan, Mrs. Annie C. Barry, and Wil 11am J. Perrigan, all of Chester. Funeral services will be held 2 p. m. Thursday at St. Daniel _ ME Church, with burial in Haven Memorial Park. Friends may call at her home from 5 to 10 p. m. Wednes- day. opening address Mr. Long presented the honor guest with several gifts on behalf of the board. can Party by Turner who, ally, is seeking re-election to a twelfth term. They formed a close acquaintance when Slassen, then Minnesota's chlet executive, served as President of the Council of State Governments iiml Turner was a member of the Board of Directors. The latest word received by Turner Indicated that Stassen would arrive in Philadelphia at '1.12 this dUei-noon. He will be met at the Thirtieth Street Station by Turner and Clarence L. Conner, President of the County Commissioners, who Cheltenham Township hncrearse. said the three youngest children should the Authority withhold the will e ree yo should the Auory wo e be taken to the Montgomery ratc increase until Jan: 1, 1947, the County House of Detention at Jef- Is all that would be avail- able until 1949 for proceeding with the development of the Octoraro pro- fersonville. The oldest child is twelve. TO WORK 1U WUK.1Y Iject, said. This would I I mean delaying construction plans'1' POLIO VICTIM IN ISOLATION ANNEX Lawrence Taylor, two. a victim of infantile paralysis, Is the first pa- tient to be admitted to the new isolation annex at the Chester Hos- Taylor child, who lives on N Y V RIDLEY PARK ARIET STORE 17 E, HINCKLEY AVE. RIDLEY PARK PA, TAYLOR TOT and PAL ALL METAL BABY WALKERS Special Tbose present were: Mr. and Mrs. Long. William H. Jones, Eugene Mergy. Mr. Ffiison, William R. Pro- vost, Miss Mnclarlanc. Mr. and Mrs. William Ward. Jr., Mr. and Mrs. William Blakeley, Jr., Mrs. Blukcley. Sr.. H. H. Ward and his grand- daughter, Joan Donahue; William B McClenachan. Jr.. Mrs. Frank Hntton. Mr. nml Mrs. William Dun- can. Mrs. Marie Wade, the new ex- ecutive secretary; Mrs. Bess R. Stouppe and Mr. and Mrs. Theodore Mftlsch. also is the speakers' chairman for the campaign. From there he will be brought lo the county, and after a brief rest, mid dinner, depart with the Repub- lican entourage for Ycadon. Before the war, which witnessed Stassen's resignation as governor In 19-13. to enter the Navy, he was a frequent visitor to the Turner resi- dence on Idlewild lane, Media. Continued From One mean delaying consirucuou piuub The Taylor child( wno on and issuing in bonds on road, Swarthmore. was Jan. 1. 1949. admitted to the hospital on Monday. Meanwhile, an immediate rate He !s nmv m a respirator and his i Daniels business agent for increase enables the Authority to conditioii is reported to be fair. The ciil 312 an AFL teamsters' union, proceed with construction, plans usual treatment for polio is being announced this morning that 11 as soon as the Public Uulity Administered to him by Dr. Burton striking drivers have returned to Commission approves the transfer p_ chancep physician for the Dela- work for Scott Brothers trucking of the Octoraro water rlrghts from ware Colmty chapter, National In- concern under a settlement reached the Pennsylvania Railroad tothe Paralysis Foundation. _ lln-.nl TlrVlH Cl.H I Pn L _ s _ ii____________-. ___w_ ,3 A Funeral Home for the past 15 years, died suddenly of a heart attack at his home on "Sunday evening. He had lived in Collingdale for the past 22 years. Survivors include his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Clark, of Darby; his wife, Margaret Dick Clark; four children, Dorothy, Richard, Robert and Harold, all of home, and a sis- ter, Mrs. Thirza Baylour, of Darby. FALLE FROM ROCKING HORSE Two-year old Edwin Kremere, 1019 Culhane street, had his "'first fall from a horse on Monday. The steed was a wooden rocking horse. But Edwin was taken to Chester Hospital anyway and treated for bump on his head. MRS. ANNIE E. JVIAJOR Mrs. Annie E. Major, a former resident of Media, died Monday night at her home, 35 Elmwood Place, Elizabeth, N. J. She was 81. Wife of the late Thomas H., Mrs. Major had lived In the County Seat until about 20 years ago. Requiem mass will be said at the Church of the Immaculate Concep- tion, Elizabeth, N. J., Thursday morning and. there will be a viewing at night at the Rigby Funeral Home, 1 West Baltimore avenue. Media. Interment will be Friday in Cal- very Cemetery. Surviving are a son, Paul F., of Elizabeth, and a daughter, Mar- jory, an instructor in the U. S. Nurs- ing Corps at Syracuse University, N. Y. Monday night. U. S. TREASURY BALANCE Washington. bal- ance Oct. 25, In- ternal revenue. cus- toms receipts, receipts, expenditures, 879.250.918. 5 Conlinuc-l From Pn-e One the provisional agenda a proposal that details on all Allied troops stationed in non-enemy countries be disclosed. The American delegation's posi- tion was that the Russians, in the interests of peace, nlso should yub- lo-.nl company, Mr. Dodd stated. annex, named the This, he said, will bring inland s Irving Memorial. In honor water to Chester a year sooner of the past president and member than waiting until January to make of thc Chester Hospital Board, was the rate increase. I opened on Oct. 20. It accommodates 15 patients. o i Mrs. Esther Htiikel, RN. supervisor I Q tCLV ol Pediatrics nursing at the hospital, J is in charge of the isolation unit. i J D The Taylor child is now under the of a nurse from the Infantile tion.s." The agreement was signed May 23 nfler the government seized the" mines to end a long strike. Some quarters here believed Lewis hncl been privately assured that the contract would be reopened, possibly by Reconversion Director John R. Steelinnn, who has been nctlve in crisis during Krug's nb- intcrests of peace, also should yuo- llsh details on their own troop dis- I o positions. However, it was emphas- J______________________ X ized that the American delegation I O nt.titude was not contingent on sim- The "continued warm and humid" liar action by the Soviet. Union. portion of today's weather forecast American publication of troop dis- read like a mid-summer prediction would head oft what was the weather felt summer-like I w -IParalysis Foundation. S Have Your Suit or Overcoat MADE TO MEASURE JP Choose from 100Tr All-Wool Worsteds K, Custom Tailors 309 MARKET STREET Also Alterations and Cleaning the coal sence. Shortly plJSlLlUI IS VJll vv Lit! no >Y vti i n Tjrjn'r Ti expected to be one of the most bitter to many Delaware Countians. battles in the current nssmbly meet- The Weather Bureau said that the m W V Continued From Page One gates, etc.. unless you with larceny. after Lewis' announce- ment, Mr. Trunuin told a news con- any that them would be no coal strike. Ho did not whether he felt the .entire dlspute would lie settled peacefully or simply that the wulk- not. start Friday as mmld weather this afternoon, and Wednesday. No more rain out would threatened Some quarters believed that If the government does reopen Lewis' en- tire contract, its aim would be to 111 l.Ilt UUiltllU U1.V 1 Jk I_I..IL ing. Soviet Foreign Commissar V.i early morning fog and drizzle would M. Molotov was scheduled to spc.ikjgivc way to partly cloudy, warm to the assembly later in the day. and ......'-1 fVl'- it wns believed ho might renew Rus- sia's demand for troop details. The small nations, meanwhile, re- newed their assault, on the Big Five veto power with the Philippines, Co- lombia and Syria attacking the uses made of the veto in UN Security Council meetings. Brig. Gen. Carlos P. Ronuilo. Phil- ippne" delegate, said that his nation Don't remove license tags from That is an extremely ilrst-born state of the atomic jsrt a wage pattein th.i limiting the veto "to i would head off another winter ot cxtent Uwt u wm irrippling strides in other basic obstruct our efforts towards dustrics. ,oi' ineaceful agreement." Mr. rruman-set. last winters 18 on the veto mies- cents an hour pay_boas fornuila in Rnnmio sald. ls "not only nec- the strike by the CIO United Steel but Workers and it subsequently served css'u> DUC a-s the basis for the contract with Lewis. Chief slimmed UD the sitim- chief summed up the sUim Directors Pave Railroad Property Part of the Watts school yard, Fourth and Edwards streets, re- cently paved by the Chester School District, belongs to the Pennsylvania Railroad and not to the school district. This in- formation war passed along to the directors in a letter from the railroad's real estate agent which was read at the Monday night board meeting. The lot was not leased for playground purposes, the letter stated, and the board was asked whether it desired to purchase or lease the property. President Frank G. Andrews stated that the board had been misled In its property lines when paving that area and suggested the directors ask for lease on a a year basis. The matter was referred to Solicitor Archie Levy for study. j FUNERAL HOME [Thomas E. Rairdon ttJCCESSOB 1 M and r FHONX Jica CEMETERY MEMORIALS WAR MEMORIALS VETERANS MEMORIALS R. P. OGLESBY 1809 EDO. AVE. PHONE 2-1321 f oiks For truly exquisite design and pure rxccl- Icncc in craftsmanship, our jewelry merits j-oar unhesitating choice. Priced from CASH or CREDIT One of Lewis' apparent aims now is to got credit for the AFL for a higher formula in the second round of pay boosts. OfUcial-s hinted the government would probably use the negotiations beginning Friday for another at- tempt to" get o'ut of the mining business. One source said the coal mines administration might ask the mine owners to re-enter negotiations with Lewis to get a contract that would permit return of the properties to Adolfo Costel Durels, Bolivian delegate, charged that, some nations were using the veto "merely to suit their own ends." "If we do eliminate It, we must limit it." he said. rir.st speaker after the assembly convened nt H. E. Paris El-Khoiiri. chief Syrian delegate- made n compartlvcly mild attack on the veto. 6 Continued From C Page One O general manager of TVA Today's Weather Temperatures for High yesterday. 76 at 4 p. m.; low this morning. 60 at 1 a. m.; average yesterday. 66. Precipitation In 24 hours, .22: this month. 1.97. Sun rose. 6.2G a. ni.: sun sets, 5.03 p. m. Moon rises. 10.49 n. m.: moon sets, 8.04 p. m. New moon, Oct. 24-31. Today's tide.s At Chester: High, 3.06 a. m.. 3.32 p. m.: low, 10.21 a. in., 10.57 p. m. Local cloudy and continued warm nnd humid this afternoon, tonight and Wednesday, Expected today, 74; low tonight, 60; high Wednesday, 74. i Authorities nlso disclosed that the war-time ban on being masked on the .street still applies and will be in effect until the war is officially declared over. Children can wear masks on the street but adults can- not. GARAGE ROBBED OF S16 Giancono Scalloline. who operates a garage at 1400 West Ninth street, notified police yesterday afternoon that a thief had entered the estab- lishment during his absence, taking S16 from a desk. GOOD WILL REPAIRS After many delays, Good Will Fire Company is now making needed repairs to its building at Fifteenth and Potter streets. De- lays were caused by labor shortage and material scarcity. SYRUP OF Sedacitrate For Relief of Colds, Cdughs, Croup Johnson's Pharmacy 902 Keystone Road Chester Penna. ALEXANDER'S! HEAVY ENAMEL WALL COVERING for bathroom or kitchen. Grease and dirt certain tough wear. Will wear many years. In tile, all colors at 51.17 A SQUARE YARD We carry stainless and chrome moulding. ALEXANDER'S HOE, 6th Phone 7167 A. L. LAHN. Prop. [jCillllt llHUIll Ui tui: [.Ii I Lt Vli private operation. The mines were since 1939, to succeed Lilienthal. J seized last May 22. NEXT FRIDAY NOVEMBER isi FEAST OF ALL SAINTS Holy Day of Obligation MASSES AT OLD ST. MICHAEL'S 5, (5, 7, 8, 9 and 12.05 Noon The new commission was created by Congress summer. The ap- pointments, including Clapp's. are subject to Senate confirmation when the new Congress convenes in January. Mr. Truman charged the commis- sion to carry on "an ever-expanding program through which the benefits i of atomic energy may be realized." "We the president added, "that the full measure of ithese benefits cannot be achieved jwithout the establishment of ade- quate international controls.'' He said the greatest step toward realizing the promise of atomic jcnergy lor the world Iny In success- ful conclusion of the current UN [negotiations for world -controls. without studying charts or weather maps. The temperature also has been running degrees nbove the 53 normal on Monday, for ex- ample. The temperature ranged from 61 at 3 a. m. to 76 at 4 p. m., Monday, for a dny's average of 66. The low this morning was 60 at 1 a. m. Ex- temperatures are a high of "4 today, low of 60 tonight, and of 74 again Wednesday. The rainfall in the past 24 hours totaled .22 of an inch in Chester vicinity. The month's total now is 1.97 inches. WANTED, FEMALES To t.ikc Instructions In Ceramic Jewelry and Pottery Crafts. A ploas- ant and protltahtc hobby. The course Is very reasonable. Classes now formlnK. Complete cer- amic and pottery supplies. Phone: Ridley Park 3565 BLACK BLAKTON CT.F.ANVNG-DYF.VNG-rRESSJSG Free Call and Delivery Scrvics 1005 EDG. AVE. Ridley Park 014S Chester Z-SM4 flatesfitpiirtdQuicUj DR. H. SHORE D E M T 1 S T 701 Welsh St.. Chester PHONE CHESTER 2-2421 New Plastic Plates PRICED XOU CAN AFFORD1 EASY PAYMENTS I   

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