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   Chester Times (Newspaper) - March 16, 1933, Chester, Pennsylvania                              DAILY AVERAGE NET PAID CIRCULATION FOR SIX MONTHS ENDING SEPTEMBER 2Q1 OS FINAL EDITION With All Latest and Best News of the Day 57TH 17542 Daily Leased Wire Reports of United Press UP and Inter national News Service INS CHESTER PA THURSDAY MARCH 16 1933 TWENTY PAGES McCLURE PLANS JO RECALL BILL ON SUNDAY SPORT Senator Whose Negative Vote Caused Sensation to Propose Changes Will Vote Aye if Amend ments Are Adopted x Makes Statement PRICE TWO CENTS HARRISBURG March Apparently killed hi a historymaking Senate vote Tuesday the Schwartz Sunday Sports Bill proposing changes in Pennsylvanias blue laws had a new lease on life today Senator John J McClure Delaware county whose negative voted caused a mild sensaeion will move for a resurrection of the bill Monday night If the reconsideration is granted he will offer amendments If the changes are incorporated in the measure Mc Clures vote will be aye on the roll call The Delaware County Senator pro poses first and foremost a referen dum In the shape in which the bill was defeated it would legalize sports in communities where licenses weie granted locally and the referendum could be held later Under McClures plan Sunday baseball during the ap proaching summer would be impos sible because the people would not have an opportunity to pass upon proposed modification until the No vember election rules provide that the vote on a defeated bill may be recon sidered within five legislative days if two Senators whovoted in the negative make the demand A sec onder to McClures motion would not be difficult to obtain it is be lieved but that in itself permits only another roll call on the bill and would not necessarily assure its pas sage It is senatorial courtesy to per mit reconsideration and still allow the man seconding the motion to vote no on the second roll call The bill failed Tuesday by two votes the count being 26 to 24 If the amendments are inserted and McClure furnishes the only change from the original roll call the vote would be tied at 25 and Lieut Gov E C Shannon presiding Senate officer would have to break the deadlock The McClure amend Continued on Last FAILED TO AFTER COLLISION Frank Gruszka 31 of Wilson street mear Eighth street will be arraigned for hearing in the office di Magistrate Michael A Hbrian charged with operating an automobile while under the influence of liquor and failing to stop and render proper assistance after an accident Gruszka was arrested on a war rant last night several after police say he abandoned his auttf mobile which figured in an accident at Third and Lamokin streets Three cars were damaged in the crash according to police reports One owned by Mrs Louis ODonnell 1131 Parker street was parked on Third street and was rammed by a truck driven by Walter Lister 632 Jeffrey street after thelatters machine collided with a small coupe operated by Gruszka police say When officers arrived on the scene they found Gruszkas car in the trolley tracks and it was while they were removing it that the driver dis appeared His identity was learned by police who had the wanant issued for his arrest ECONOMY BILL GOESTOFDRFOR HIS SIGNATURE House Concurs in Amend ments Made by Senate Yesterday Spanish War Veterans Over 62 Years Remain on Pension List WASHINGTON March President Roosevelts economy bill carrying extensive sav ings in veterans expenditures and Federal salaries was given finnl House approval today and sent to the President for signature The chamber accepted without pro test Senate amendments cutting some from the estimate of total savings thus completing Congres sional action on an unprecedented grant of power to the Chief Executive It was understood the decision not to resist alterations in the original draft of the measure was made after consultation with Mr Roosevelts ad visers In combination with the beer legali zation and taxingbill now pending in the Senate and retrenchments pos sible through governmental reorgani zation the economy bill is expected to effect the longsought f balanced budget The principal Senate liberalizations of the drastic bill are as follows An allowing payment of war risk insurance claims already filed but not yet adjudicated An amendment authorizing the President in his discretion to allow hospitalization ofnon servicecon nected disabilities Amendments forbidding the re moval from the rolls of any direct service connected cases or Spanish War veterans over 62 years of age but allowing compensation reduction in each case An amendment allowing domicil iary care for tuberculosis and ncuro psychiatric cases not directly trace able to service origin The total loss of economy from the Senate amendments is estimated at FORMER JUDGE DIES BANKS BACK ON BUSINESS MEN NORMAL SCALE PROTEST ACTION DEPOSITSKEEPUPj OFCITYCOUNCIL City and County Units Oppose Creation of Office FRANK G PERRIN G FORMER JUDGE DIES SUDDENLY Suffers Fatal Attack of Heart Disease Today at His Home in Media PerformingTheir Usual Functions Philadelphia Scrip Is Re called Local Certificates Rare Appointed to County Bench in 1927 by Gov Fisher Served 2 Years Continued on Fourteen SEEKS INCREASE FOR TEACHERS SALARIES ARRESTED AFTER FREEFORALL Stoves were upset and hot coals strewn over the floors furniture was wrecked and windows knocked out during a melee in the headquarters of a local group of longshoremen at Front and Parker streets early this morning News of the ruction first reached Patrolman McCauley who was in the vicinity of Front and Penn streets but when he arrived at the place he found it deserted Later four men partly identified as the ones who had been in the place were arrested at Third and Parker streets They gave the names Bert Robin son 39 of Philadelphia Joseph Kis ley of Parker street in the 300 block WiUiam Schwartz 24 of Lester and Rafph Welsh of Pennell street near Fourth street Each was assessed the costs on charges of being drunk and disorderly when no one appeared to testify against them court The president of the Local was pres ent in court and paid for the releass of the quartet 2T PAULS The Rev Frederick A Warden rec tor of Christ Church Ridley Park will preach at the Thursday evening Lenten preaching service in St Pauls Church Broad and Madison streets this evening HARRISBURG March A prediction that Pennsylvanias ed ucational structure will completely collapse if the appropria tion for teachers salaries is not in creased by the General Assembly con fronted State officialsVtoday This assertion from the executive board the Pennsylvania State School Directors Association was presented to Gov Gifford Pinchot legislators and the State Superin tendent of public instruction It ac companied an appeal to the Governor and General Assembly to boost the financial support to public schools many of which may not be able to open tinder the proposed appropria tion it was claimed LEAGUE COMMITTEE NAMED Baseball league plans within the ranks of the Triangle Club were dis cussed last evening at a committee meeting held in the Y M C A Building Seventh street and Edgmont avenue The following members were appointed to plan schedules and other arrangements for the club Ted Ryan James Mewha Lehman Clark and Edwin Lonquist Plans of the club will depend upon the obtaining or the use of a play ing field and the committee members are planning to request the use of either the Deshong Park diamond or the field at Tenth and Butler streets SENATE GROUP BACKS NEW ENVOYS WASHINGTON March The Senate Foreign Relations Com mittee today voted a favorable re port on two major diplomatic ap pointments but decided to postpone action on the nomination ofRobert Worth Bingharn of Kentucky who was named for the embassy on Lon don The nominations ordered reported favorably were Josephus Daniels of North Carolina to be ambassador to Mexico and Jesse Isidor Straus of New York to be ambassador to France Frank G Penin a former Judge of Delaware county died suddenly this morning about 930 oclock at his home Third and Edgmont streets Media Death was due to heart dis easo He had been feeling unwell for the past few days but continued to visit his office at 10 South avenue daily He was preparing to visit his office this morning when he was stricken Dr E Marshall Harvey his physi cian was called and remained with him until he passed away for the funeral have not been completed Mr Penin who had been practic ing law in Media for a number of years was appointed Judge of the Delaware County Courts on May 17 1G27 by John S Fisher the governor under an Act of Assembly creating an additional judgship He served until February 1929 being defeated for the office at the election held in November 1928 Mr Perrin was a former captain of Company H Pennsylvania Na tional Guard for a number of years He is survived by his widow Blanche Senill Perrin and one daughter Margaret He was a member of the bar association for years and was always active in poli tics He was a memberof Bartram Lodge F and A M of Media He studied law in the office of George E Darlington the late dean of the County Bar Association whose death occurred recently after hewas graduated from Bucknell College He was admitted to the bar in 1898 be fore Judge Thomas J Clayton Mr Perrin was 57 years old He was born in Uplandand attend Hhe borough schools His father was Benjamin Perrin a North Chester farmer The son served in Cuba as a Major with Company K of the Na tional Guard during the Spanish American War He has a sister John Lawton of Middletown township and four brothers Charles P of Upper Darby Benjamin and Robert of Philadel phia and James Perrin of Chicago The banking situation in Chester and Delaware county was virtually normal today All but three insti tutions in the county were operating xinder permisison from the govern ment uvo being conducted along re stricted lines and the third awaiting formal permisison for reopening Deposits yesterday were heavy in all banks and withdrawals few the latter being in the category of reg ular transactions Yesterday scrip of the Philadelphia Clearing House was recalled by the Quaker City banks and quite a bit of it was held by Delaware county residents Of the in Phila delphia certificates printed 000 was authorized for distribution and less than actually was used by the Philadelphia banks Chester banks recalled their scrip j on Tuesday and most of it is in the j possession again of the banking in j solutions except for those certifi cates held as souvenirs Slate Situation With the approval of federal and state banking authorities 909 banks or more than 80 per cent of the 1147 banking institutions in Pennsylvania today were open on a normal business basis Banking officials may within the next few clays augment the list of sound banks as the result of sep arate formal hearings accorded some of the 225 banks which thus far have not been grantedlicenses to renew business Of the 225 banks sixtytwo are statesupervised institutions while 163 arc national banks under the jur isdiction of the Third Federal Reserve District The 909 institutions were licensed to reopen for complete banking op erations during the past three days of Police Superintendent and Proposed Salary Claim Plea for Improved LightingWas Refused Because of Lack of Funds Continued wi Lsst Pagrc PIKE KIWANIANS HONOR ST PATRICK The Chester Pike Khvanis Club at its weekly dinnermeeting held last night in the Boone avenue public school Glenoldcn celebrated a Night In Ireland in commemoration of Irelands patron saint Rev Gilbert Condit pastor of the Glenolden Con gregatonal Church who wac in charge of the program presented the Irish Ramblers a quartet of singers from one of the Philadelphia radio stations Burgess Harry Sfcdckland of Glen olden gave a short talk on the re cent trip to Doylestown where the local club held an interclub meeting with the Doylestown Kiwanis Club of which Judge Calvin Boyd of Bucks county is president and Car mon Ross lieutenantgovernor of Ki wanis is a member A fiveminute talk was given by Edgar J Magnin of Sharon Hill a veteran newspaperman in the Ches ter pike area who spoke on Jour Announcement was made at the meeting that Ladies Night would be observed at the meeting of the clxib to be held on the night of April 26 DECLARES WOMAN WIELDED ICEPICK A storm of protest against the pro posed appointment of a superintend ent of police is sweeping the city and local merchants are combining to fight the passage of the ordinance i which will be brought up for second i and final readings at the meeting jof city council next Tuesday I One merchant who is bitterly op posed to the move declared this morning that the merchants will de mand to know of council how they decided to find the salary to be paid the police superintendent when the city fathers were unable to find a fraction of that amount for better street lighting in the central business zone a matter that has been agitated for three years Last year a committee of mer chants appeared in a body before council and asked that better lights be installed in the central business zone Plans for the lighting had al ready been drawn and such plans submitted to the city authorities The answer was that council could make no definite promise as many taxes were unpaid and as far as could be ascertained it would be im to even promise the lighting of a single block because of the lack of available cash The salary as set forth in the ordinance will not be an addi tion to the budget as passed for the j current year The money will have to be taken from sonic other appro priation and transferred to the De partment of Public Affairs The merchants also point out that a superintendent placed in the posi tion to raise the efficiency of the po lice department is an admission that no one on the force at the present time is capable of producing the re sults desired and such an admission warrants a close investigation of how the department is functioning at present with the view of making changes according to close observers It is planned to call a meeting of the merchants before theend of this week so that their plan of battle may be outlined before next Tuesday It is also understood that the com mittees that advocated a retrench ment program will cooperate with the merchants in opposing the pas sage of the ordinance KIN GETS POST MDONALD WARNS OF WAR DANGERS IN GENEVA TALK Presents Proposals for Disarmament and Asks Parley in 1935 There will be another Roosevelt as assistant secretary of tlunavy Presi dent Roosevelt who formerly held that lias appointed his cousin Colonel Henry Latrolu1 Koosvvclt to the offioir Colonel Roose veltwhose homo is in New York served as an officer in he Marim Corps during the war DISCUiES USE Railroad Company Official Is Guest Speaker at Ki w a nisMeeting SOLDIER DIES AT 00 ALLENTOWN Pa March William H Bartholo mew who commanded Company P 47th Pennsylvania Volunteers in the War of the Rebellion and Company I of the old Fourth Infantry died today of apoplexy he was SISTER WILFRID A WILKESBARRE Pa March Wilfrida formerly Caroline Lepper died shortly before midnight yesterday at the Holy Farnily Convent Danville according to word here today Sold His Auto Two Hours After Times Appeared Do Chester Times classified ad vertisements bring results Ask J H Straughn of Ehvyn The other day Mr Straughn de cided to dispose of a sedan type car and offered it as a sacrifice inserting a classified ad in the Times Here is what happened according to the former owner of the auto Two hours after the Chester Times was published the car was sold I certainly approve of the results obtained through a Times classified advertisement FollowMr Straughns example when you have something you wish to sell in a hurry Ice picks may soon be placed in the category of dangerous weapons if the number of persons in this vi cinity being stabbed with such im plements increases Early this morning John son 38Negro applied at the Ches ter Hospital for treatment of a stab woundof the left arm He told police he was stabbed by Susie Burley of Fulton street who used an icepick during the attack on him During the past month several Negroes have been stabbed with ice picks during brawls they being much easier and safer to handle than the oldfashioned razor CHANGE IN DETOUR Among the changes in the schedule of detours for the period ended April 16 was released fay the State High way Department today was that at Lansdowne IT S Route 1 one and fivetenth miles EARLY MARKET Trading at Greater Volume on N Y Exchange Than Yesterdays Business Transactions on the New York Stock Exchange up to p m to day amounted to approximately 2660000 shares as against 1890000 shares in the corresponding period yesterday NEW YORK March A roaring stock market a sensational New York cotton mart and an ex cited Chicago wheat pit were the an swers today to public interest in spec ulation Commodities particularly were soaring with Chicago grain prices at restriction peaks all along the lines It was considered significant that on the Chicago wheat pit there were few offerings It was a market mndj for the seller but withthe seller still reluctant to jump in In New York there were demonstra tions within the big buildings on Greenwich street Williams street and Broad and Wall homes of the New York Curb Exchange the Cotton Ex change and the Stock Market The trading community had been spurred by yesterdays upswing Brok ers had advised overnight that the 2 to 16point advance on the stoak market might continue for a day or so Trading was at a considerably greater volume than yesterday At noon today 1970000 shares had been traded in against 1220000 yes terday At the end of the first hour today 860000 shares had beentraded in against 540000 yesterday Representatives and officials of Ihe railroad and trucking interests were interested members of tile audience that heard n brief address on Rail road Interests in the Commercial Use of the Highways given at the weekly meeting of the Kiwanis Club by R J Litticlleld chief of motor service of the Pennsylvania Railroad and a resident of Swarthmorc The meet ing was arranged by William Toppin of the local division of the Pennsyl vania Railroad Following his introduction by Mr Toppin the speaker remarked that railroad people arc often criticised for their careful investigation and study oC highway conditions He then gave a long list of Important reasons which lead the railroads to keep a careful check on matters rela tive to the commercial use of the highways The investors and insurance com panies concerned with the prosperity of the railroads were said to bo the first groups who not only insisted In a close scrutiny of highway uwe by railroads but continually asked for even closer attention to the mat tor with n view to regulate what they believe to be unfair competition State authorities it was said also continually request support of tho railroads for Lhc reason they feel a need for their assistance Which they allege to exist this assistance is given by reports to the stato of vio lations observed by the railroads on Premier Sees Stream of Events Drivingto New Catastrophe GENEVA March Warn ing solemnly against the clnnser of war Premier J Ramsay MacDontxld of Great Britain today presented i drastic proposals for disarmament to Ihe World Anas Conference Kb proposed a new conference of all naval powers in 1035 the year before the limitations of the London Conference expire mci presented a British convention looking to reduc tion of armies navies and weapons It there is failure then the si ream of events will drive you speedily to new catastrophe Mac i Donald said vehemently pleading for 1 agreement Failure will loose the passions which make war Have we not had enough of enmity and war and the settlement of issues by force In announcingthat the British plan proposes a naval conference in 1MB MacDonald said It is not our fault it past naval trcattos were not general i The British plan proposes abolition j of military and naval aviation pro viditifv a means is found of safe guarding the misuse of civil aviation It also provides Tor the foJknvinp 1 A naval holiday on all capital ship construction until 1935 2 Future limitation of all mobile land guns over 105 millimeters ap proximately 41 with reten tion of existing guns up to 155 milli meters approximately GI 8 Limitation of tanks to 16 tons in size 4 Reduction of continentalarmies by onethird after standardization 5 Prohibition of air bombing and setting the number of airplanes pos sessed by France Britain Japan Italy Russia and the United States to 500 each CONSIDERATION OF BEER BILL Adopts Amendment for Wine and Fruit Juices in Record Time Mo d rf i c a t i o n Revenue Would Bringin About a Year Continued onr Last Pagc MRS ROOSEVELT FLIES TO CAPITAL WASHINGTON March Franklin D Roosevelt arrived nt Washington Airport at a m today after a flight from Newark N J It wfis a good trip but very Mrs Roosevelt said as she landed here It didnt botherme but some of the others were very miserable Roosevelt Js a seasoned air traveller and has frequently landed at WashingtonHoover airport But this was the firsl flight she has made since Inauguration and the first flight ever made by a first lady DEAD AFTER RIDE SYRACUSE N Y March taken for a ride in his own car Joseph Carlucni 40 Syracuse contractor was found dead in his machine in a byroad near here today with three bullet wounds in tho head AT TROPICAL PARK Swing Zombro Tcirarchul Sue Terry Scotland Beauty Don Carlos None Anon Boiirjty Outis Gul fenano Pot An Pluck Saint DAmour Anne Gros Rubridge In Eveline F FlaggPorter Bobo Mary Marvin Loyal Louie Weather clear track fast AT FAIR GROUNDS Man Sun Memory Way Weather clear track fast J TWOCENT STAMP MAY COME BACK WASHINGTON MARCH intensive effort to winp out the postal deficit which may possibly include restoration of the twocent stamp rate was promised today by Post master General Parley He told nevspapermen he is having la survey made to assemble all the t faces relative to the two and three ccnt letter rates and he win base his decision on the data There seems to be an antipathy in the pubhc mind against the three cent stamp he said If I find it will help the country and the pa trons of the mail service to reestab lish the twocent stamp I will so i recommend to Congress immediately LONDON March 1933 by United again is an armed camp The war drums are not throbbing yet but in the midst of the greatest tension since 1914 many are talking war everybody is fearing it nobody wants it J As before the World War Europe is splitting into two and her allies against Germany and her allies Britain is desperately anxious to remain neutral but fears she cannot The postwar peace machinery especially the League of Nations and the Kellogg pact is badly weakened by the unimpeded Japanese occupa tion of Manchuria and Jehol and the undeclared wars Letitia districts POLISH I THE COPPtOOP Woman Pays One Cent Income Tax HARRISEURO March 16 INS local internal revenue office today claimed the record low for an Income tax return An unmarried woman appeared at theoffice with her return all filled out An Income of 24 cents over the SlOOO exemption hown The tax was a penny or precisely nineand sixtenths mills The woman gave the affidavit paid the cent to a smiling collector and departed It would have been easy to shave off that 24 cents but she made out the blank herself and it would have been a shame to mar such honesty the collector ex plained later WASHINGTON March Sir Ronald Lindsay he British ambassador informed President Roosevelt todny that Ramsay Mac Doriald the British premier is pre sentinga new disarmament program at Geneva today The ambassador said he was not familiar with Its details but added that he to con sider It the best possible pre disposition WASHINGTON March The Senate today began consideration of the 32 per cent beerwine bill and in ii minutes adopted the finance committee amendment including wiiio and fruit juices among the beverages to be legalized Chairman Harrison of the commit tee brought the bill forward estimat ing ihe annual revenue to be derived froins Volstead net modification would amount to from to 000000 He said it was proposed to levy n license fee on retail wine dealers and on retailers of beer Brewers would pay for a li cense and wholesalers The winefruit juices section of the bill came before the Senate in the form of a committee amendment the House having voted to legalise only beer Chairman Harrison of the Senate finance committee explained the bill in use over 10 minutes The clerk report the first amendment said Vice President Garner John Crockett whitehaired vet eran reading clerk read Jn line Jive insert wine similar fermented malt or vinous liquor and fruit juice All in favor say aye all opposed no Garner said so quickly that fewer than half a dozen Senators were quick enough to vote on cither side The ayes have it and the amend ment is nprced to Garner ruled and the Rallcries exploded with laughter Senators scarcely knew what was happening1 Bui ihcrc Avas visual evidence on the desk of Senator Sheppard Dem Tex that there was to be delay for one speech nt least A page appeared with four thick books Stacked on Sheppards desk they became a read ing stand The author of the 18th amendment soon was denouncing tha beer bill Sheppard said ho would detail to the Senate certain facts that bughfc lo be made a matter of record He recalled a prominent brewer had testified before a House Committee last year that it would require the expenditure of ever a twoyear period to brinp beer pro WASHINGTON March INS Norman H Davis was appointed chairman of the Amcrcan delegation to the Geneva Arms Conference to day with the rank of ambassador He expects to sail next week Davis succeeds former Secretary of State Henry L Stlmson as head of the American delegation IN DEATH OF WIFE READING Pa March Chief Running Wolf Kutztown herb dealer today stood convicted of voluntary manslaughter for the kill ing of his 27yearold wife Etta in a roadside lunchroom near Hamburg several months ago The 58yearold Indian known also as Carl W Taylor served as a leader in the B E P cnmp at Anacostla Camp WnshinRton D C last summer A highlight of his trial which began Monday was the testi mony ot General Pclham D Glass ford former Washington chief of police who characterized the defend ants character at the veterans camp as beyond reproach MISSING HUSBAND When she returned home from Philadelphia last night Mrs Alice Blades of 205 Urban avenue Nor wood wife of Alexander Blades a bor ough policeman found a note ad dressed to hor lying on a table The content of the note were Babe I have left Dont look for ma Unable to understand the meaning of the misuvc Mrs Blades began an Invest Ration She learned her hus band had reported for duty as usual at 530 oclock That he had returned home changed his clothing and had then disappeared Late last night he was found at the home of his mother Mrs Edward Layfield Blades on Market street Marcus Hook where it was said he would return home today and report for duty this afternoon Continued on WARMER WEATHER ON WAY Fair wcaLher Is predicted today In Eastern Pennsylvania New Jersey Delaware and Maryland There will be increasing cloudiness and warmer weather tomorrow and probably rain tomorrow night The highest temperature hero yes terday was 48 degrees at p m and the lowest was 40 at r8 p m The average of 44 was four degrees above normal for the date and twenty degrees above tho average March 15 last year Maximum tem perature for the date is 68 estab lished in 1921 and minimum 18 In 1000 Sunrise today was at a m andsunset will be at p m Eastern Standard Time U S TREASURY BALANCE WASHINGTON March The Treasury net balance for March H was Expenditures that day were Customs receipts for the month through March 14 were icsofTImes FIRE AT J PEMBERTON N j7 March One fifcrnan was slightly in jured and damaged exceeding resulted today from a fire which de stroyed the feed mill of Grover Broth ers and Company and for a time threatened the entire northern section of the community in the Chaco and of South America Continued on Last Page Europes next battlefield as many observers have termed the Polish corridor the center cf new concern as Hitlerite Germany openly threat ens to isrnorc the Versailles treaty The map shows how the corridor civinp Poland an outlet to the sea wedffc between Germany proncr apd East Prussia stilJ German territory The corridor closely patrolled by Poland is the scene of frequent border clashes Familiar Old Beer Bar May be Banned in Penna Chesters brewery Ls going to beer We merely print this for the in formation of some persons who are al ways hunting news The new ordinance creating a new job in the police department to en force discipline and ability seems to be an awful reflection on those al ready drawing salaries A new sign has been placed near Chief of Police Vances office which reads No loud talking Maybe that explains why they have been in a huddle for several years past Maybe the new Superintendent of Police will decide that our depart I mcnt needs no messenger boys pipes student of municipal govern ment Var you dere Sharlie The average man changes his posi tion once in every 17 minutes during his sleep says a local M D A similar rate of turning over might help slum bering business Mike Honan is traveling around with big business men these days Jim KeLso thinks this is a lot of boloney Chester brewery is in no position to make good beer for two months Which only shows what lack of prac tice will do California bakers arc making bread from seaweed Thats nothing Chester bootleggers have been mak ing whiskey from garbage for years HARRISBURG Par March Gleaming mahogany polished brass and shining of 13 years ago may never return to Pcnnsylvanlans For even if the famed of Budwelser and Schlitz are legalized up to 32 per cent the oldfashioned bar will not be permitted in Pennsylvania if present plans prevail Under the provisions of a state beer control bill drafted by the Sowers committee bars arc banned and drinks must be served at tables Part of the bill to be introduced in the State Legislature next Monday night says No retail distributor may have any bar at which malt cr brewed beverages shall be served to customers or shall sell any malt or brewed bev RIDLEY PARK GIRL SIGNALLY HONORED Continued on Miss Elsie Bonnett daughter of Mr and Mrs Frederick Bonnett Jr of duPont street Ridley Park has been chosen by Alfred University stu dents as the best looking and most popular girl in the student body of that university and will rule as Queen over the annual two day festival ONE OF SPEAKERS James L Rankln local attorney will be the speaker this evening at the organization meeting of the Tax payers League of Sharon Hill to be held in Sharon Hill borough hall Speakers from Upper Darby will also address the meeting Wea tlher WASHINGTON March Weather forecast Eastern Pennsyl Cloudy with rising tempera ture tonirht and Friday possibly Itfrht rain Friday In extreme north portion Western Pennsylvania Mostly cloudy toniffht and Friday probably liffht rain or snow flurries near take Eric warmer tonight and in south portion Friday New Jersey Mostly cloudy with rising temperature tonight and Fri day TODAYS TEMPERATURE 6 a m 7 a m 8 a m 9 a m 10 a m 36 11 a m 43 35 Noon 44 35 1 p m45 39 2 p m47 42   

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