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Charleroi Mail: Saturday, December 9, 1944 - Page 1

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   Charleroi Mail, The (Newspaper) - December 9, 1944, Charleroi, Pennsylvania                               Good Evening Success may be under the next layer of even if it isn't the is fine exercise. THE CHAKLEROI MAIL ESTABLISHED JUNE NINETEEN HUNDRED The Weather Snow flurries and colder to- night Sunday continued cold with snow flurries. VOLUME 159 WASHINGTON SATURDAY. DECEMBER 1944 FOUR CENTS YANKS PLUNGE DEEPER INTO SIEGFRIED Seto Naikai Area Of Japan Hit By B-29's Bombers May Have Sought Fleet At Kure Naval Base Second Sortie Over Tokyo -Follow- ed By Hour-Long- Raid On The Seto Naikai Coastal Area Of- Japan I NUISANCE RAIDS I MADE OVER TOKYO Dec. 9 American B-29 Superfortresses raided the Seto Naikai coastal area of Cen- tral Japan for more than an hour to- Radio Tokyo touching off speculation that the giant bombers may have sought out the Japanese fleet at the Kure Naval base. Tokyo also said lone Superfortsses for the third straight day made two nuisance attacks on the Japanese capi- tal itself during the morning. Only during the first at 3 a. m. p. m. were any few the broadcast said. The second sortie over Tokyo at a. m. was followed by.an hour- long on the Seto Naikai coastal Tokyo asserted. The broadcast did not how many B-29s participated or whether any bombs were dropped. Seto or flows between the main Japanese home is- lands of SHikoku and Kyu- shu. The Kure naval base lies on the southeast coast of Honshu. The Japanese broadcast said that the E-29 attacks on Tokyo a very small number of night and is indicative of the fact that they are aimed at a war of Dec. Navy pa'rade of Superfortresses which hit Two Island midway between and Tokyo yesterday met little it was disclo-ed1 and pil'ots were certain a Iv.rge percentage of bhe-ir. bombs landed in the target area. Returning pilots said there not a S'inigle enemy figh'ter in the skies and that they encountered only meager and inaccurate anti-aircraft fire. Walter Kelly of command pilot of one of the last over said he saw the first 10 bombs of his string explode on the target as he peered through a break inr the overcast. certain that 160 heavy bombs hit the target number two Jap he s.id. Kelly flew 52 mission's from British and Nort'h African baizes before com in'g here with a Superfort and he part in the first B-29 missi'on over Tokyo. REPORT LOCAL SOLDIER HAS BEEN WOUNDED PFC Meno Wounded In Action In France November Wire Reveals A wire has been received by Mrs. Mary 205 Third Char- revealing that her Private First Class Steve was slightly wounded in action. The wire from the War Department to inform you your son Pfc. Steve Meno was slightly wounded in action the 24th of in France and is also receiving a Purple Another Sergeant Michael who was stationed in France has also been wounded and is retiring in a hospital in England. Another Private Alex is stationed in Camp N. C. and is coming home on a three day pass. He is expecting to be shipped out soon. Private Nick Borch has arrived safely somewhere in France. GERMANS ADMIT VAC CAPTURED BY RED FORCES Key Defense Center Is Lost Kussians Step Up Pressure Dec. Josef Stalin announced today that the Red Army had broken' through the German lines northeast of advanced 37 miles on a 75 'mile and reached the Danube above the Hungarian capital. FOUR KILLED BY GERMAN V-BOMBS Dec. 9 Four persons were ki'lled and a number in- jured when a Gei'maw V-focumb demol- ished four houses im a South England toKvn disclosed today. A number of persons were believed to 'have been trapped the debris of the dwelling's. The Air and Home Ministers mean- time announced that during the 24- hour period ending at da'wn today fly- ing bombs landed in Southern Enigland and caused1 some d..mage and casual- Dec. Ger- man army today acknowledged the loss of transport and defense center on the Danube 16 miles north of to Soviet forces swiftly investing- the Hungarian capital on three sides. A Berlin broadcast said the Red army stepped up its pressure the breach area north of and after fierce fighting Vac fell into Soviet hands. Vac lies on the elbow of the Danube due north of Budapest where the river swings down toward the capital. It controls the trunk transport lines north of which are on the east side of the river. As the Russians rolled up the Nazi flanks north and southwest of Buda- the Ankara radio said all civil and military authorities had left the capital. A Hungarian general named Kulde was appointed military gover- the broadcast said. Moscow and -Berlin dispatches re- vealed that major tank battles were raging cm-either side -of 'the -beleag- uered with reinforced German and Hungarian divisions putting up a desperate but losing fight to hold open their two main lines of communica- tion between Budapest and Vienna. Four armored columns of Marshal Feodor I. Tolbukhin's Third Ukrain- ian Army wedged deep into the Nazi defenses between Budapest and Lake To Piiiee Allenport Soldier Is Missing In Action Pfc. Joseph son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter of Allenport Bor- has been reported missing in action in France since November according to a telegram received by his parents. Pfc. Santo was inducted into service February and was assigned to the 377th 95th Division and lias been overseas since July 1944. Pfc. Santo was home on furlough July 15. Three brothers arc in serv- Sgt. John with an Armored Division in Andrew Santo with the Air Corps at S. and pvt. Frank Santo with the Air Corps in England. Pfc. Santo is a former employe of the Allenport mill of the Pittsburgh Steel Company. PITTSBURGH FREE OF SMOG FINALLY Dec. Pittsburgh was smog-free today for the first time in nearly a week and the Weather Bureau reported good visi- bility ranging over a wide area. RAVIOLI AND SPAGHETTI Hollow every Saturday. 45c per plate. 265t2p CHRISTMAS TREES Finest Scotch Pines. They last don't litter floors. Limited. AIV sizes NOW. Barnett'sv Service Station across from Coyle Theatre. 15614' RADIO SHOW Dec. 10. See them m Wilma Jerry and the iBJues Chasers at Pol- Third Monessefi. Tifne 8 45 Hold Connellsville Man In Roscoe Death Shortly after he had entered a plea o manslaughter in the death of Mrs. Hargai-et Simon was held re- sponsible for the death of the woman. fatality occurred when' a car vhich Layman had stolen from a street in crashed near Poplar Grove into another machine operated by -Eugene E. Mc- teesport. Mrs. Kruppa's death was due to a fractured skull. She was with her husband in the Hojara car. 13 Japanese Admirals Die In S. Pacific United The deaths of 13 Japanese admirals in actions along the South Pacific- were Announced tod-iy by head- quarters of the Yokosuka naval sta- Japan's largest home base. The transmitted by tihe Japanese Domei Agency and re- corded by did not rpecify dates of death but it could be assumed the officers were kUled Oct. 4 sinc-e on that date Yokosuka announc- ed the deaths of seven other admirals in previous actions. Among the 13 dead listed by Domei wag Vite Admiral Hideo former chief of Navy press section and a key figure in Japanese propaganda circles. Others Vice Admirals Take- hisa Yasunoshin Ito and lohimat-u Rear Admirals Senza'buro Rinzo K-akuo Saburo Migi Shigeri Oka and Masayasu and Surean Read Admiral Yokichi Oda- jima. WEEKEND SNOW AND COLDER FOR VALLEY You'll be glad to s-it by the fireside over the weather man said in ghoulish glee today. 'Snow flurries wiH fall tonight and tomorrow. The temperature wj-11 begin falling tonight and it will be right smart New England weather by to- morrow afternoon. If you like it your weather is corning. METHODISTS PLANNING CRUSADE FOR CHRIST CAMPAIGN ON SUNDAY Dec. has been set apart by the members of the Methodist Church of as for Sunday. The Methodist Church at large is engaged during the month of December in raising a fund of to be used in World Relief and Reconstruction in those countries where the war has caused destruction of church property and also caused untold suffering among millions of their this to be done when hostilities shall cease. The local church has set apart the coming Sabbath in which to canvass its members and secure their sub- scriptions and gifts for their share of this fund. Under the direction of a of which the pastor is chair- Sunday afternoon has been chos- en for that purpose. The canvassers will meet at the church at for and will set out on their work at' two o'clock. GERMANS PLAN GREAT WINTER ROCKET RAIDS Claim Rockets Will Be Fired From Danish Bases WAR PLANTS JAPAN DAMAGED BY EARTHQUAKE Severity Of Tremor Admitted By Japs Osaka Area Damaged Advance Scored After Smashing Counter Attack Postponed Meeting Of Council On Tuesday postponed meeting of Charleroi council will be 'held a-t 8 o'clock next Tuesday evening m the it was announced today. of a quorum scheduled date for the mede postponement necessary. Dec. Lon- don Daily Mail dispatch from Stock- holm said today that the Germans were preparing- for a great Winter rocket offensive from Norwegian and Danish possibly with V-3 which i.cheduled to be ready for use against New York by the end of this month. The quoting ob- and Norwegian underground said the Germans were stud- ding Norway'e famous skiing slopes w-itn bases. The main it apparently were being bu'ilt atop foot Mt. highest mountain in South- ern but others were con- structed on heights as f_r to the wa.t and north as Bergen and perhaps Trondhime. The dispatch theorized that since height was not required for the suc- cessful launching of V-l robot bombs and V2 the bases m-zy have been designed for launching V-3. Only last Swedish sources said Germ-H' Munitions Minister Al- ceit had reported that be- lieved a super-rocket capable of span- ping the would be ready for lirin'g against New York City by the end of December. Only German citizens connected with the TODT construction organiza- tions were being used to build the the Daily' Mail said. Scores of square miles around each base have been cordoned off and are patrolled day and it United The Japanese acknowledged for the time the .-everity of the bhait ripped across central Japan Thursday afternoon and reveal- ed that war plants and residential areas were d-ma'ged in the Empire's second city. Carefully-censored enemy which for the past 24 hours had been minimizing the extent of the listed damage caused by tidal waves and landslides in a half- dozen crowded manufacturing centers extending from the edge of the Tokyo district to 240 miles to the we-t. accounts issued by the Domei News made no mention oi Tokyo itself or of the loss of life in Thursday's which observatories around the world recorded greater than the 1923 convulsion th'at wiped out Yokohama and much of the capital and killed almost persons. 'quake was but losses were limited1 to buildings damaged in one and on the whole not much dama'ge was Domei as- serting that precautions already t-ken against American air raids had helped keep doATii the damage. The Domei recorded by FCC admitted the shock was particularly heayy in the Os.ka a factory city -of. residents. Second only to Tokyo in size and the sea- port city is a vital railway and ship- ping hub and is packed with metal and chemical plants. Damage also was caused in the Shimizu and N'agano districts in Japan's thud largest city. Before the Na'goya was the center of Japan's avLtion industry. SIXTH WAR BOND SALES SLOW UP HERE YESTERDAY Only Small Increase Noted River District AMORY HOUGHTON RETURNS TO POST WITH CORNING Amory board Corn g Glass who been serving during the past year as Dep- uty Chief Administrator of the Mis- sion for Economic Affairs in has completed .the final details of h.is assignment in D. and has now actively resumed his work at Corning Glass Works in The Sixth War Bond campaign slowed up decidedhi in Chnrleroi and tnt Monongahela River district jrs- torflay wifh only mnall increases re- ported by the workers. In Charlnroi 1649 sales raised the total of bonds bought to while in the district the total as of this morning's report was- 908.50. Only a Few days now remain in tht Sixth War Loan campaign and it is hoped that the quota of will be reached in Churlemi by that trme. A little extra effort on the part of the woikers is urged- bu bond offic- ials in order to secure the necessary amount to ivaeh the required quota. The latent WFC leport for Wa--h- ington bond files and total individu.l fel- bonds S444.- individual Panhandle Di-trict total individual 419. Washington Distrie-t total individual 865. Only two districts in Washington Cour.'ty have thus f r reached or their quotas. They are gettdtown whioh has subscribed 116 per or -and which hajs subscribed about 150 percent of its quota. Flame Grenades And Cannon Used In Repulsing Ger- Battered Enemy Finally Retires From Fiijht THIRD ARMY MASSES FOR GRAND ASSAULT BULLETIN Dec. headquarters estimated today that 132.000 German troops were captured or wounded in the first three weeks of the Allied offensive now biting into the Siegfried line in the Saar iind pounding the Roer river de- fenses before the Cologne plain. Americans Thrust To Outskirts Of Ormoc BIG SUPER PARTY Every Saturday French Club. Third St. ttnd Creit Are. 7 to 10 p. CHRISTMAS TRtitS Will bt is usual at 702 Avenue. for tipeniftg Threaten To Roll Up Rear Of Enemy Forces On Leyte Island Allied Dec. The American 77th Division thrust into the outskirts' of last sizeable Japanese port on today in a drive threatening to roll up the rear of enemy forces fight- ing to the last man against a frontal assault nearly 20 -miles to the north. The division overran Camp an old American military camp dat- ing back to the Spanish-American on the outskirts of Ormoc yes- terday a three-mile advance from the beachhead they had carved out only 24 hours earlier in a surprise landing. The speed of the advance indicated that the Japanese cangrtt off balance by the amphibious ttol be to ancc to prevent the speedy fall of their main supply end rein- forcement gateway. Tokyo claimed that -Japan- ese ground aided by paratroops have the Ameri- can airfield at -more than nine miles behind the American lines on Leyte. It also asknowledgtd the Americans landed south of Ormoc and claimed that Japanese planes had sunk nine American ships and dam- aged six others the east and west coasts of Six other American divisions sent the all-out offensive on Leyte into its third day by further tightening their strangle hold from the north- southeast and south on to Japanese henrtnw into pockets in the northwest corner of the Central Philippines is- land. The Seventh Kttttw York. In a personal letter of apprecia- to Mr. Leo T. Crow- Administrator of the Foreign Economic Administration with juris- diction over the recently In a letter I have ust received from Phil Reed General Electric who served in London as chief of the advising me of lis decision to return to private was distressed to learn that you iiad made a similar decision and that therefore we could not look forward to your stepping into Phil's place and carrying on the work of the Mission for Economic Affairs in London which has been so ably directed by the team of Reed and Houghton. To A Column FLYING FORTS HIT RAILYARDS Dec. 9 More than 400 Flying escorted by about 275 Mustangs and Thunder- attacked railyards an-d an air- fieW in the Stuttgart area of Ger- m'any today. The and all of the li'g'hth Air attacked the Ger- installations around Stuttgart 30th visually and by instrument. British Lancaster bombers and Spit- fire fighters also were en route to Germany apparently in a resumption of the weather-cri-mped offensive Against the N'azii-. LAY DOWN STRIKE NEW WRINKLE HERE While out-of-state workers on a gas line attempted to complete work on a McKean avenue job this Rudy one of the striking workers of the Manufacturers Gas Co. created a new wrinkle in suspensions by a down While four workers tried to com- plete the got into the excavation and laid down. The work was halted temporarily until po- lice ordered Buchta out of the excava- tion and permitted the out-of-state men to go ahead with their work. RAVIOLI AND SPAGHETTI French Lock Saturday night 5 'til Price GRAND PARTY Every Satnrday nifnt to et 020 Dec. Americar infantry knocked out 12 bitterly-de- fended pillboy.es with flame-throwers grenades and cannon and plungec leeper into the maze of Siegfried defenses northwest of Saailauteri today after smashing the stronger vierman counter-attack yet uncorket of the Saar river. Some GOO crjuntei-attaeklng Ger mans with 11 tanks stabbed back iht American-held two and miles northwest of Saarlauteri and six miles inside the Saar a a. m. yesterday. The battle sway jrl back and forth through the street and houses of the town for more thai LO but the battered i.lly withdrew at 5 p. m. Southeast-of Saa.rlauter merits of Lt. George' S. Third Army massed strength jroad siege arc for a grand assau n industrial he Saar and exterided the icw beachheads across the Saar rive '.ear Saarguejnines. German resistance was a along the line as the Third Army b leeper into the vital Saar regior which supplies the hungry Germa jvar machine with 10 per cent iron and and six per cent of i jozil. One big iron and steel worl already has been seized by the Amer cans at Dillingen. On the Third Army's eastern flan Let. Gen. Alexander M. ican Seventh Army swung north tvi miles through the eastern tip i France to within six and a half mill of the German border a dozen or mo miles northeast of Sarre Union. on the Rhine river nil miles northeast of al fell to the Seventh while oth elements farther south teamed .wt Tu Piier 0. Fltmmr Ben Suddenly Becomes Youngest Pilot Captain Benjamin F. considers himself the young- est pilot on the Monongahela river. In taking the oath in the office of the collector of customs at Pittsburgh as master of the steamer he stated that he was born at Feb- ruary 1944. He inadvertenly inserted the figures of the current instead of the year in which he was born. he look the oath to his statement. MEMORIAL RITES SET TOMORROW Christian Church Worshipers Honor Two Soldiers Form-.l rites of Memoriam will held tomorrow evening at 8 o'clock ths First Christian church for service Sergeant Ja-ck.A1 Cuiker and Raymond who ha given their lives in the service of thi country. The public is invited to parbicips La ihfci e intfiiorial at t church. Seen This Morning washing at 8 a. m. neons for Fallowfield ave- nue signs. celery from a Florida fan- cier to an old Charleroi friends. CEMETERY WREATHS and up. HAUBE'S FLOWERS. GAY FLOWER TRIMMED HATS And winter white. CAIRNS' HAT SHOP. SPAGHETTI AND RAVIOLI Sons of 7th St. and McKean Avc.. every Saturday 5 p. fn. til 1 IGNORE CANVASSERS FOR Gl GIFT CASH There arc no canvassers' for Christmas gift cash in Charleroi anywhere in the it was. nounced today following diacloa that confidence men work such a game here. Give r.o money to anyone solicit war bond gifts for serY men or charity lice warned. But you should call authorities immediately. RAVIOLI AND SPAGHETTI Saturday and Gftribi SM SPECIAL PARTY Sunday night at the Palish H 342 Crest Are. at 7 e'eh M CHRISTMAS TREES bs sold- as usual at 702 MeK Avenue. Watch opettinjr d   

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