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Charleroi Mail Newspaper Archive: December 7, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Charleroi Mail

Location: Charleroi, Pennsylvania

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   Charleroi Mail, The (Newspaper) - December 7, 1944, Charleroi, Pennsylvania                               Good Evening A good way to figure how to buy war bonds is to estimate how much money you can spare and then double it. THE OHARLEROI MAIL ESTABLISHED JUNE NINETEEN HUNDRED The Weather Becoming cloudy today with temperature rising to about 45 de- grees and cloudy tonight and with rain tonight.______ VOLUME 157 CHARLEROI. WASHINGTON COUNTY. DECEMBER 7. 1944 FOUR CENTS RATION'S 3RD ARMY STORMS SAAR DEFENSES -f 4- 4- 4- 4- Superfortresses Raid Manchuria War Plants Second Formation Starts Fires In Attack On Tokyo Third Anniversary Of Pearl Har- bor Ushered In With Raid On Japanese War Muk- Darien Bombed JAPANESE BELITTLE RAIDS BY AMERICANS Dec. big task force of Superfortresses ush- ered in the third anniversary of Pearl Harbor today with a raid on Japanese war factories in Southern and enemy broadcasts said another formation of B-29s started at least one lire in an attack on Tokyo itself. following its usual policy of belittling American said' three or four Superfortresses dropped a small number of incendiary bombs in a on the Japanese capi- tal about 2 a. m. p. m. Wednesday The line fire started was mediately Tokyo as- serted. Tokyo identified the Superfortress targets in Manchuria as the industrial city of Mukden and the port of Dar- ien. About 70 of the B-29s carried out the two-way a broadcast reported by the FCC and claim- ed 11 were shot down and four more probably destroyed. suffered some damage in the city of Mukden and the port of Dar- an official Japanese announce- ment said. damage to im- portant installations The Japanese Domei Agency also said that a single Superfortress in- vaded the skies over Tokyo at p. m. yesterday a. m. Wednes- day but after a hurried brief flight before most Tokyo citizens noticed is believed that these enemy planes were on a mission of the 'war of nerves' aimed at the people on the home Tokyo said. In what obviously was intended as a preventive the Tokyo radio reported that Japanese planes attack- ed the American E'-29 base on Saipan at dawn today and dcsti-oyed a number of including those ar- rayed on a runway apparently ready for a The broadcast admitted the loss of a Japanese planes in the raid. The War Department announced that a large task force of Superfort- resses from China had raided ''impor- tant industrial in Man- churia in daylight today. Tokyo said the raid occurred about 10 a. m. p. m. Wednesday and claimed that Japanese fighters shot down sev- eral of a of B-29's Further details will be announced the War Department said. To Punt 3. SET DATE FOR FILING FINAL TAX RETURNS Start Mailing- Form 1040 To In- come Tax Payers Next Week Dec. come taxpayers may file final returns for 1944 on January according to a new Treasury ruling which pushes sack the date for paying final iivta'll- ments and filing revised estimates on 1944 taxes from December 15 to Jan- uary 15. The Pittsburgh Collector of Internal Revenue next week will begin mailing- forms 1040 to everybody who filed a declaration of estimated tax in and other for the most can use withholding- receipts as tax returns. Fewer taxpayers will have to file declarations of estimated 1945 due March because of a change in regulations. In all -who expected to earn more than had to file an but next year only those wh'o think they'll earn more than must file a declaration. Legion Will Pick Up GI Christmas Gifts Saturday Take Your Gift Parcel For Some Sailor Or Marine To Store Now Five C'harleroi have had bar- rels in place during the past two Wicks where jou miftht drop a gift for a soldier. These were asked re- cently by Eddie Cantor in a radio broadcast anil the American Legion cooperated in every town to collect The are for servicemen in hospitals and men in foreign service be distributed on Christmas Day. Today the Charleroi Post was ad- vised the Staie Department of the Legion must have the gifts at a central collection point much earlier for the benefit of you arc- asked 10 got your gift into one of these barrel.- no later than night. Dec1. nt 8 p. m- They will bf collec-tc-d by tht- local POSJ members thai night between 8 and 9 p. m. The barrels art- at Mont- gomery Kirk Collins Department store and McCrory's. Gifts which are donated hire will be sent by Charleroi Post to the Am- erican Legion Service 521 Grant for distribu- tion to hospitals at De- Coatesvillo and Perry Pa. f ayette City Man Is Hurt Near Waynesburg Harold of Fayette has two crocked ri'bs as Q-result of a col- lision near Waynestourjj between his passenger car and a small truck own- ed ancl operated by William -.veil known square dance figure who the moil from Nemacolin to Wtynesburg. State Police said Young started Lo make a left turn and trying to avoid a drove off the .road and hit a tele'phone pole. .Damage of was done to the truck..' Cleveland Lawyer Pays DeMille's Fee Dec. Cleveland lawyer in sym- with the cause of unionism but determined that the public should not be deprived of the of Cecil B. DcMille today paid the SI assessment.which the radio producer said violated his rights as a free man. The Austin T. mailed a dollar bill to the American Federation of Radio Artists in Hollywood. The union- had assess- ed its members that amount to fight an anti-union proposal at the November 7lh election in Califor- nia. Vigilance Keeping Numbers Down A icportetl is keeping numbers-writing and slot ma- chine operations down to a minimum on both sidft-1 of the it was learned y. Slot miichines have virtually dis- appeared and with them have many punchboards and other forms of small gambling. No reason for the present tensity is evident on the sur- MASSIVE RAF BOMBER FLEET HITS GERMANY Railway Centers And The Luena Oil Works Hit Hard Dec. 7 The Royal Air Force hurled 'heavy bombers into its greatest strike of the war last spreading fire and d'eijtruction through two west- ern railway centers and the giant Leur.ia oil works American raid- ers only a few hours earlier had drop- ped their blockbusters 'by daylight. Swarms of Btrrtis'h. intruders and nig'ht fighters I'anged out over the Reich on the flanks of the massive bombing 'bom'bing and strafing the Luftwaffe's fighter fields. the Nazis maai.ged to thro A' powerful fighter screens into the air ancl the Air Ministry reported that all four targets were strongly defended .by aircraft and f'lak. The record-breaking raid .centered on with diversionary forces s A itching off to hit objectives in Ber- lin and the big freight yards at Osn..- bruck and Glesserv in the west. The attack rounded out 72'hours of ci'Sucendoing aerial bomiborcrment dur- ing which scarcely a'li hour passed without Allied 'bombs -crashing on some corner of Hitler's Reich. Dense cloud formations blanketed To Pnjte 3. SOLDIERS AND PAL CIVILIAN ARE HELD AFTER MON CITY ROW Two U_S. Army paratroopers today faced court action and a civilian com- panion awaited arrival of a money order to pay a fine and costs totaling S47.50 ai-sessed against him a re- sult of an escapade in Monongahela. T-lcen into custody after the sol- diers had staged a 45 minute street battle ivith Monon.gahola patrol- men while their civilian- friend kept citizens from one of the trio later van out of the police station while awaiting to be placed in a cell. He was recaptured later ufter ivrcck- ing a stolen automobile at Riverview -.while being 70 miles an the Monongahelii police radio car. It developed authorities that both the servicemen had been To Pnicr 2. Plriuel TREMOR HITS JAP HOMELAND Violent Earthquake Is Recorded At Bromwich Observatory DRAFT BOARDS TO INDUCT MEN OVER HOLIDAYS Telegram Received By Local Board Showing Great Need For Men Lji.rU Hoard No. '2. Selective Service teni. irv i- in ic'.vipt cf u telegiarn from HtM.kiuar- ter.i ordering miHtary 'docile the- coming C'hti-t 'holiday The wire in part and non-fathers arc- dying hourly on the fields of battle. Liter- allj millions of fathers now in service will not bo with their families over Christmas. Local boards art- prohibited from postponing inductions because of the holiday season. Calls must be met as The slate Selective .Service pointed out the importance of filling all quotas on lime. Thsy stated the order A as issued after weie received onie loe-1 boards falling shoil on their calls because of a disposition to grant holiday postponements. As a result of the order the next contingent of draftee-i niU be sent out fiom all loea'l boards in Pennsyl- vania. Smash Closer To Burning Capital Of Saar Valley MASS SEDITION HEARING ENDED Dec. The mass sedition case ended in a mis- trial today. Federal District Judge James M. Proctor formally declared a mistrial o fthc seven-month-old proceeding af- ter a poll of defendants revealed that they would not consent to continuing with another judge presiding. The special session was held to de- termine disposition of the case as the result of the death of Judge Edward C. Eichcr a week ago. Pass Two-Thirds Mark In Sixth War Loan Drive Increased Effort Urged So Quota May Be Passed On Time The sale of bonds in- the Sixth War cramitaign passed the two-thirds mf.Tk in Charleroi today with a total of reported for The qnota is In the dfc trict the sales were rapid- ly nearins the mark. The report for the days shows actually turned in by thfc workers. The quota in the MoTumgaheia rtrref dis Ifiil Is This is good hews coming on the third anniversary of the Pearl Harbor i ter. It is belieVed that the quota in both Charteroi and the District will be reached within the time allocated by the U. S. Treasury Department for the campaifrn. The need for the money by trre gov- ernment The seriousness of a developing shortage in American munitions output was brought home recently by production and manpower officiate reeonm sion in 126 cities. It is nrged thwt ttoty fat 4 Charge Man Beat Mother-ln-Law Dec. Marcus of Homestead vas arrested by Homestead police to- day on a charge of beating and slash- ng his mother-in-law with a hatchet. Mrs. Bertha was in crit- cal condition in Homestead hospital with her throat slashed and her head cut. Ginsberg was arrested today after an all-night search by police. was to be brought to coufity detective head- quarters for further questioning re- garding the beating. BURNS FATAL TO HERMINIE CHILD Dec. Sandra Jean Ham- mand was burned to death in a blaz- ing home at Keystone near Hcr- while mother accompanied an older child to the school bus. When the Mrs. Louis Ham- returned from taking her six- year-old to the she found one side of the eight room dou- ble house ablaze. Dec. violent possibly centered on the Japanese home war-' recorded at the Bromwich observatory tod y and seismologists reported that power- ful tremors still were jbcing recorded six houiv after the initial shock. The observatory said the center of the shock was located miles dis- possibly in Japan or the Kurile or in' the Aleutians. The first tremor uas recorded at A. M. A. M. and r.d- ditional shocks still were observed at West around noon tod'ay. Seismologist J. J. Shaw at the ob- ervatory de-bribed the tremor as one of the greatest in his experience. Thii di'iection of the earthquake was pa.tiaHy but Sha.v all were thot it came from the Ja'p'an-Kurile.--AIcutian.i area. major waves which traversed the surface came in with uc-h fury that parts of the recording mechanism were thro n from their bearings ami only by their being constantly re- placed it possible to record this he said. the excur.-iions of the re- Tn I'mtr I' Towboat Carbon Being Hull Saved The steamer Carbon of the Wheel- ing Steel Corporation is being dis- mantled now. Captain R. E. marine superintendent will use the hull to replace art existing pump boat in the Sletibenville harbor. v CEMETERY WREATHS and up. HAUBE'S FLOWERS. BIG SUPER PARTY At lUtian Corner tifcfcth JAP GARRISON AT ORMOC HAS BEEN ISOLATED American Infantrymen Battle Up West Coast Japs Claim Paratroop Attack ALLIED Phil- ippines. Dec. in- fantrymen battled up the '.vest coa-t of Ley-It within ten miles of Ormo- today after crt eking through a strong Japanese Lne along Ihe Pahirais and a communique announced that IT. S. naval and air foices b.ve com- pletely isolated the enemy g. rris-on from all sea-borne reinforcement or upply. v.a- no confirmation of enemy reports that Japanese para- troops landed on four major American ui-r fields on Leytc inland night in what Tokyo described as n to knock out Gen. Douglas MasArthur'- island bused air power. said the paratroops attacked Tn fnicr 2. NEW REGULATION ON GAS COUPONS Dec. The Office of Price Administration warned gasoline station operators to- day that henceforth every outdated or uncndorscd ration coupon will be charged back to the station that accepted it. OPA said the new regulation was of intensified program to com- sat the gasoline black market. REDS BATTER OUTER LINES OF BUDAPEST Hit From Two Sides Armed Spearhead Drives Deep At Balaton Gap Smash From West And Advance Into Fcrbach Carries Americans Three And Half Overnight LONDON. Dc-i-. armored ur'ru'arU drove deep into th.e soiithfin LSalnton Gap from Austria toduj and lierlin i e- that other Rod Aimy forces U'IMC battering ihe outer de- fenses of Budapt.it from two in a climactic ill turn pi to Lake the Ilnn- ffaiiiin capital by htorm. The entile 200-mile ninth-front extending across Hungary fi om northeast to touthwcst exploded into fuiioun action the Guun.in.- pour- id reserves into the- Austiian jrute below Bala'.on and the new danger zone of Budapest. Enemy reports said Marshal Fin- der I. Tolbukhin'i Third Ukrainian without .slowing the tempo its drive for had wheeled its liifht flank northwaul to join Mar- shal Rodion Y. Malinovsky's Second Ukrainian Army in a. pimu assault' on the Hungarian capital. Moscow's early morning war bulk-- tin partially continued the Merlin ac- reporting thai Tolbukh'm'.i forces had 14 miles north- ward along the west bank of thf Danube to take south of Budapest. Other Third Army battled up PATTON SWINGS IN TOWARD SAARBRUCKEN To olumn .'I. i Seen This Morning wreaths. man too busy to get a haircut during store hours. FIRE SWEEPS CHURCH BINGO Dec. 7 swept through the crowded parish hall of St. Ambrose Qivrch early panicking a crowd of more than 200 persons at- tending a bingo and card party. Three were trampled or burned to death in the hall. A spectator who suffered a heart at- tack in the excitement was a fourth victim. Origin of the Mate de- Ju 34 tenons were in tkttimorc hflBpitah for Ntfffe wthef rHjwrtts. Ninw Itdfe rf m UILIUI Ufiiontown Converts For Teen Age Canteen Uniontown has put into action a Recreational Commission and is- con- verting- the Municipal Auditorium on the third floor of the City Hall into a Teen Age Canteen. M.mbership will be maintained by dues paid by young folk who attend. DISMISS CHARGE. AGAINST DORSEY Dec. perior Judge Arthur Crum today dfe- missed assault charges against Tom- my the bandleader whose birthday party started it his glam- orous wife Pat and Gambler Allen Smiley. Pilots Complain Of Navigation Hazards Navigation haxards arc according to pilots who r to Harbor No. Mates and Pilors. that a number of navigation on bridge's thn Mononga- hela River arc not burning. The haz- ards are it was said on ac- count of heavy fags. On -this stream the running lights- on the Tenth St. were -the red light on the lower side of- the left channel pier Of the Glcnwood bridge was neither did the running lights of the Clairton-Wilson high- way bridge pilots said. A white light was reported showing on the upper side of the Monongahela City highway bridge because the green fresnel lens ia broken. guard officers were asked to make immediate repairs. PARIS. Dec. Gen. George S. 1'atton's troops stormed the outer defenses of dustrinl capital of the Saar basin from two directions today and by Herman iircounl broke into the Nazi from newly won positions across the Saar river. Front dispatches said the Third vanguard was within four miles or of city of 135.000 astride the and indicating that a frontal assault on the shell-pocked and stronghold was imminent. The Berlin acknowledging American cro.ssinga of the parently those northwest of Saar- where three bridgeheads had been that in the in the was in full The Nazis claimed that one S. battle group which crossed the Saar was but said armored urmiu at other points penetrated into the forufield fortifications of the Sieg-' Tried line. They were and partly driven a broadcast followinK with the aclrnissiolVvOf heavjr figrhtinjj in. the. 10-mile flf _ fortifications many. -V. On Patton's right Mnj..Gen. John S. Wood's Fourth Armored vi.-ion forward four miles .ttx the town of 13 miles .southeast of Sarreguemines. His forces bioke up a herd of about 40 Gorman by two com- panies of knocking out Ifj thfc tanks. The 'advance a -Nazi pocket five mile.-i wide attiTaix imik.-i long on the Montbronn Forest. of the 35th Division vir- tually completed the mopup of 'the two thirds of Sarreguemines on the west bank of tht Saar river 10 miles of Saarbrucken. Northwest of Third Army uriitri fought intd atvl defenses of Siegfried line from three expanding1 Saar river bridgeheads along a front of at least five miles on either side of Saarlautern. The Third Army now wan cither abreast or across the Saar along a solid front of 22 miles. Lt. Gen. Jacob L. Duvers' Sixth Army'group farther reported that the Germans appeared to have written off Alsace and were streaming cast across the Rhine river To Pair.- X Warmer Tonight And Rain Tomorrow Likely persisted in the district pilrxl another blanket of heavy fog on the Valley earl-v this morning and seemed sOre to bring rain tonight and tomorrow. weather man said lansea- sonal temperatures would continue. He predicted more fog tonight and early tomorrow continued rain likely all day. Rain might chase the fog blanket and weather. Youths Under 19 Sent To Combat Dee. Soldiers under 19 years of age are being sent into combat AM re- placements. Undersecretary of War Robert P. Patterson said today that this re- versal of previous Army policy was due to exigencies of the military situation and the lack of enovgh suitable replacements over 19. He explained that no respective of entered combat without adequate training. Gener- ally he every MiMwr entering actvie combat has a rnrni- mum of eight months' prior acrricc. ANNUAL BAZAAR Friday and Red Cross Headquarters. Auspices Good Neigh- bors Club. CHRISTMAS TREES Finest Scotch Pines. They don't litter floors. Limited. All sites NOW. frWi Three Bentleyville Area Students Hurt In Crash Trio tn Charleroi-Monessen Hos- pital With Severe Hurts Today Three Bentleyville district school students were in Charleroi-Monesserf hospital today with severe injuries re- ceived at o'clock this morning when the automobile in which they were ridir.g against a wail near Beallsville. The Injared The Ross of Bnjtleyville. Be suffered head in- bnralf about right shoulder and lacerations at face and had several teeth loosened. of Bentleyville. tt.ho suffered a possible fracture of the left lacerations-of the Trose and lower jaw. Her. condition was fair. Helen of -who received chest injuries and severe lac- erations of the face. She is in a farf condition. The trio was admitted to tal after 1 o'clock. It .was rspoited cd to negotiate a turn and struct retaining   

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