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Charleroi Mail Newspaper Archive: December 6, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Charleroi Mail

Location: Charleroi, Pennsylvania

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   Charleroi Mail, The (Newspaper) - December 6, 1944, Charleroi, Pennsylvania                               Good Evening Not only does beauty but it leaves a record upon the face as to what became of it. THE CHARLEROI MAIL ESTABLISHED JUNE NINETEEN HUNDRED The Weather Rain beginning in west portion this afternoon or evening. Occa- sional rain tonight and Thursday with mild temperature. VOLUME 156 CHARLEROI. WASHINGTON COUNTY. WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 6. 1944 FOUR CENTS RAMS OVER SAAR AT POINTS Industry Told It Must Secure More Workers Challenge Thrown At American Industry By Nation's Top Lead- ers Spearheaded By Lt. Gen. Somervell WEAPONS PROGRAMS LAGGING Dec. The nation's top leaders in the war effort spearheaded by Lt. Con. Biehon B. tluvw the urgent challenge to American industry today that it must mobilize more manpower im- mediately to provide more and more weapons for quicker Soervell. commanding- general oj the Army Service in vhat he termed most important speech 1 have ever told manu- facturers attending the War and Re- conversion Congress of American in- dustry that more are needed now Lo bring the lagging mun- itions and weapons program up to schedule. Victory against Germany and he is in the balance. A. chairman of the War Production Board pointed to a 40 pel cent lau- in reflected in a joint statement by Secretary of War Henry L. Stimson and Secretary of Navy James V. Forrestal. ''We need more more and more of many typts of the secretaries' statement said. Although the Congress was called to co-nskler problems of day's made it plain that any return to- peace time manufacture was far in tJne future. The emphasis of their words was that there musb be greater production strides now for war before the we. pons of peace even are iderE'd. Krug and other speak ers urged that post-war readjustment plan's not be but shelved temporarily. in his Somervell said that munitions tire being used up faster in Europe and in the Pacific Theater than they aiv being 'that 27 per cent of the war production pro- gram is today in the critical category and that the against ter victory in be the biggest-and most expensive war ever waged. It will cost a he added. I fail todaj to get this situation across to you and to these the General paid. will have faiicnl all in the armed forces and the 10 times that number on the home in his address to the first session Of the emphasozcd that the expanded production sched- ule must Jje instituted not only to bring the war in Europe to a nut to aid in the- fight against Japan. SCOUTS TO AID SALE OF BONDS IN THIS AREA Sixth War Loan Sales Slow Up In Charleroi Yesterday's Report Shows Total Of 1273 Bonds Sold For Sales in Sixth War Louu cam- paign have- slowed up considerably duiing the. current week and the in- crease over yesterday's report very Izirjje. Today's report for Prizes To Be Offered Troops Selling- Most Bonds In Campaign River Chin Woi's quota is and the half mark has not .jet been reached although the campaign is now in the third week. In other places in Washington County ihc quota has Charleroi district Scouts will aid in the sale of bonds in the Sixth War Loan campaign which is now under -war. At a meeting- of ihe Publicity com- mittee held yesterday noon in the Elks Club ii was decided 10 offer awards to the troops selling- the most bonds between December 11 and 23. The first award will be in the second and the third The prizes been arranged loc- ally and are no I to be given by the government. At' jcsterday's meeting with Chair- man Lloyd Littrcll Paul Scout Commissioner for the Charleroi was present and discussed the matter with the group. Agicumeni was reached that the Scouts would undertake to help in the ja'.e of the bonds. Assisting- in Ihe sale of bonds will be a special activity for the Scout group which has played a prominent part in many -ways in helping in the war emergency. It was announced last night at the meeting of Scout Committee held in the Presbyterian church that the two leading scout salesmen of the Chailteoi area would be presented with medaU and a wads of merit from tho Treasury Department of the United States government. This includes num- ber of sales and total amount of bonds. INDIVIDUAL SERVICE APPEAL IN PDST-WAR BY ROTARY SPEAKER That spiritual elevation of the in- dividual reflects the collective mind of a nation and shapes the ideals of i ervice. stressed today before Charleroi Rotary club by Rev. Joseph Wittkofski of St. Paul's Episcopal of Monongahela ard St. of Charleroi. Witfofski was the guest of Don F. and his talk was direct ind i He lauded Charleroi's oinmtinity spiiit and ch 'llenged in- lividuals to a definite program for post planning thru service by spiritual guidance. bc-'.-ri and it i-- bilu-vt-d that .1 link- hen- the quota can be- nu-t a fo.s days'. The strongest kind of support from every white collar fai nu-r and house-wifi- needed to help the military got around the difficult especially when victory just around thv corner. More of evenythinn will bfc- n t-ed i-d befon- the war medical hospital i-qjipment and many other things. So it is urged that all who can pos- sibly do so buy extra mar bonds to help meet the nation's goal mid re- turn the boys to their homes through- out the country. To S Column 2. BALMER NAMED PRESIDENT OF FIRE COMPANY Election Of Officers Held Last H. J. Lowstuter Again Chief The Charleroi Volunteer Fire De- partment held its annual election of officers last night at the fire hall in the City Building. Roy Balmer was elected with Oliver Henderson as first vice president and F. C. second vice president. Henry J. Lowstuter was again elect- ed chief. Carl McGuirc was named first assistant chief and H. R. Hoehl second assistant. Trustees are Kay- Clarence Livingston and J. H. Waggonei' aM'd Ray' Clyde Pox and William Koerner. H. R. Hoehl was elected Averill P. treasurer and J. E. reporter. 14th Boy From Bentleyville Gives His All Town With Population Of Has Over 800 Boys In Armed Service Of TJ. S. MON CITY OFFICERS SUBDUE SOLDIERS AND CIVILIAN IN BATTLE Patrolmen Wray BickertO'd anil Byers of Monongahela had a tough time doing but they finally succ2eclcd in locking up two unruly soldiers ar.d a civilian of the GT's had been forced to en gigo t're in a 4n-minutP street battle while the-'olcliers' civilian fiiend fllegcdly prevented'other citi- zens from aiding tha and one of the soldiers. had fled during the melee later was sighted in an at 70 miles an hour through New- Eagle before the serviceman wrecked the found to have been at Riverview. The danugecl beyond re- it had t-tolen from Fifth Monongahela. It is owned by Charles of 422 Chess Monongahela. At the city one of the soldiers refused to give his name and he was put down The other said he was Louis Ges of Fort Ga. The civi'iian g..ve his name -as Ed- wnrtl W. of 30 E. Long- fello.v Homestead. SOUP LUNCH Methodist Thursday. Dee. 7th. 11 a. m. to 1 p. m. S5c. CHRISTMAS TREES Finest Scotch pines. They last don't litter floors. LimRed. All sizes NOW. Bartett's Strtice Station across from Coyle Sees Brother With Yank Forces In News Reel At State's Show Seated last night in the State thea- ter Robert DeSellems of North Char- eroi was surprised and thrilled When ic saw his brother in the news reel. Pfc. Henry L. who has icen overseas four was pic- tured moving Yank infantrymen a front line field position and passed very clo.se to the cameraman. The theater management later gave Mr. DeSellems a strip of the film on '.hich his bi other appeared. GRAND OFFICERS OF LODGE COMING TOMORROW A great time is in store for all mem- bers of the 1. 0. 0. F. lodge of Char- No. they have been in- when the Grand Lodge Offi- cers visit the local organization tomor- row night to confer the Past Grand Degree. All Past Grands in this district who have not received this degree are urg- ed to attend the meeting. The regular meeting under the command of Noble Grand Israel Mayer will begin at o'clock and at the crack third de- gree team will confer the degree on a class of candidates. Capt. George Mills urges all mem- bers of the degree team to be on hand. A splendid lunch will be served Lo top the evening's program. PAY TAX MEASURE FROZEN BY HOURS Dec. Congress rushed hoadon today toward its rbt test of strength with the White House since the the ques- tion of freezing the Social S-ccurity roll tax at one per cent for an- other year. Already sorely hurt by mili- tary still another was add- ed to increasing toll today when the War Department reported to the 'parents- of Capt. Anthony that he w. s killed in action in Germany on November 22. This is the fourteenth military death for the mining town since hostilities began. Bentleyville today has over 800 men amd women in service. The population is Capt. Rutkows'ky was- the son of Mr. anj Mrs. Joseph Rutkowsky of Oliver Bentleyville. Two Walter and Felix are in the armed forces. _ _ t Anthony has been in the U. S. Army for years. He gradu- ated from Bentleyville High School. Rsports of three wounded reached Bentleyville today. RUSSIANS ROLL UNCHECKED ON LAKE BALATON Thousands Of Germans Sent Reel- ing Backwards In Panic Dec. Russian armored rolled unehei-Ued thiough the cmmph-d Gurniiin tie-I fensi-r. at Lake- Balaton less than TiO miles from Austrian -soil today and Moscow dispatches sznd rein- j forcements were up from Italy and the Kalkans to join in a last-ditch figh tfor the- southern ram- parts of the Reich. In a great surge- of power that diove tens of thousands of and Hun- garian troops reeling back in panicky Soviet tanks and mechanized infantry fanned out along the eastern shores of the lake on a front of more than 20 miles and hooked around the opposite comers of the -18-mile water barrier. The German Transooean News Agency said a massive Russian cnvi-1- oping attack on Budapest from the south and east was in and asserted that ''German counter- measures are in There was no confirmation of the enemy which said the assault opened yesterday morning in the Jlat- van area cast of the Hungarian capi- tal and on Csepel Island directly to the south. Soviet formations crossed the arm of the Danube from to the river's west Transocean said. Heads Into Nazi Border Fortress Of Sarreguemines PGSTPONEBQRO COUNCIL MEETING UNTIL NEXT WEEK New Crossings Give Gen. Patton's Armor And Ini'antry Six To Seven Bridgeheads Across Soar River Vanguards of Marshal Feodor To Pncv .1. I. ELECT OFFICERS AT GRANGE Memorial Tribute Is Paid Two Fallowfield Members YOUTH DROWNS IN YOUGHIOGHENY RIVER Local Violinist On Radio Program Monday Grace Elaine who gave her first student recital at New York College of last Saturday will appear on the college radio broadcast over station WNYC next Monday af- ternoon at 5 it was announc- ed today. Commenting- on her recent recital it was said young artist pave a marvelous performance in view of the fact that a particular number she played is considered one of the most difficult for violin Although she has been at the col- lege only two months she vanquished older advanced students and won thru to make the radio appearance. SUPER PARTY Every Wednesday evening in the Slovak St. McKean Dec. drowned in the Youghiogheny river when he fell into the water from ice along the shore. Four other children playing with him escaped when the ice gave way. Election of officeiv was one of the principal items of business transacted at the quarterly meeting of the VV'ish- inigtoiv County Pomona Gr. nge which convened in Washington Tuesday. Re- tiring Master Thomas J. Walker pre- sided at the three-1 ession program which ua.s attended by 165 patrons representing 24 Granges. Mrs. J. B. DuvaH and Ralph Robinson l.jte of Fallowfield Grange were honored in the rnemorL 1 services among others who were eulogized. Officers elected Har- y Deemston Over- Ru.-sell North Ldcturer. R. B. Petevs William H. As i-itant Jonathan Chestnut Chap- Rev. R. E. Cl Henry Sec- Mrs. W. G. North Perry To I'nift 4. IMrniCt MANY FROM HI-Y ATTEND MEETING AT NEW BRIGHTON A total of thirteen members of the Charleroi Hi-Y attended the Older Boys Conference of -Westt rn Pennsyl- vania held at Brighton over the weekend. They Marvin Adams. William Robert Donald Ey- Jordan Roland Hruci David Joseph Raymond Eugene 5-'mitli. Paul Wagner and Merlyn Zim- merman. The delegation was in charge of W. G- leader of the local Hi-Y and the trip was made by struct car and train. The conference sessions wen in ing last and closed Sunday at o'clock. The boys were entertained in private hnnuti in New Brighton and Beaver Falls. The conference sessions wycre in the Grace Methodist the Rev. G. Meade a former local Methodist The local Hi-Y le-ader eniertaim d by the Doughertys. Addresses were made by James p. Dougal E. Butler and Chaplain Lt. Col. Wm. V. chief chaplain at Deshon and the discussion sessions' following each oC the addresses were lively and in many cases conclusive. The theme of the1 conference of These Seen This Morning clerk rolling his own. certificates for worried malea who don't knOA- what to buy for Christmas. having a hard time man- aging three loaves of two of coffee nd a stubborn dog on a Quorum Lacking Last Evening And Meeting Postponed To Tuesday a- t t .c yi ai-fiid nn cUnfi of litruuuh ihe .-pssion uai poitpoii'-d ami probably phut- n' xt even ins. John -J. Hi jiiiil Janii-s McGuiiT alone WPIC on hand and -A tiited in tin- un- til o'clock. When .li-l appeal- po-Uponemtnt found Present lo nu-ot with thf bo Burgess S. L. Sccrel ai v Virginia Solicitor H. K. Stahlman. Street Supt. Ralph Arrigo and Health Officer M. Hill. It' p- resetitalive-i from North Charleroi borough were also on hand as well T. D. loc.il Dr. F S. of the Presby- terian church and representatives 01 Endc'ovor. '1 latter rep- icsentation r'ihcu.-.-td briefly willi of- ficials the of obtaining the borouuh auditorium 'for a district which had been originally booktd for the. church. Council's meeting for next week was not fixed but will probably be an- nounced before the week Trere was an indication given however it would -be on next Tiwday night. KNOCK NEW HOLES IN SAAR DEFENSE 1' Dec. Tho Anueri- i-iin striking along a 50- mile front .it the central gateway to the Khineliind. -.ivept the Saar riier lour and five more nurthiv of Siinrlautt-rn and craihi'd into trif outskirti of the Her- man border forlrc-vi Siiareguemines li.day. '1'he ncn rrossingi Lt. S. I'altun'n armor and infantry to seven bridgeheads across Ihe Haur between Saarbrucken nnd Mer- miles to the and Chattered the last natural dvffn.it- line in the rich Saar basin oeyond repair. The Third Army took over the main brunl of ihc winter offensive as other American urmir.i to the north sparred with the Geinuin.-i in minor on the Cologne plain ami the Sixth Army group to the -outh punche. dto within acven mili-s of heart of the German pocket on the Al.jaciun plain. Front reports usuerted that the AI- have knocked out German ..'quivalerit of 1- full-scale div the ffitt three alone of the winter offensive. Ration's iJOth Division knocked the now holes in Germany's Saar line un- der cover of darkness early pushing across thu rain-swollen stream in a.ssault boats at four a two and a half mile front be- tween Merxiw and Saarlautem. Praise Brownsville Record Bond Buying At Theatre Premiere Pa.. Dec. dm In-f .-i to all the r.i -e things wo'sv cvoi said Hi o A tii- ville and iu j.roo'l is the loud .fast litink of-the .Saar river yesterday German small arm a picked the night with a hail oi bullcts-ztm but the clonghboys leached thfc ea.-t bank and curved out ntir assigned bridgeheads. Farther in Ihc Merzig urea reconnnissance units of the. 10th ArnniH-d Division alno slipped across the Saar in small patrol but tliure was no indication whether later were reinfoived in strength tir withdrew. Infanli men of the Division won their second bridgehead on the on all battle fron-li inudo by thj report of je.-ult.s in that district's Sixth War Loan prcmiaie Mon niu'nt at Plaza theater. south of where they.. Hiihe-ij a mile beyond the- stream. Other units of the- exploiting tin- initial Saar bridgehead in lautern wen- reported wedging Th.- th t he- id 'rouri I tlie into the- outposts of the Siegfried line moic than a mile and a half beyond. county' or of was Heavier On Loss At Gordon Home Fayette County Probation Officer William E. Gladd stated yesterday that 12 jouths ranging in age from 9 to 15 have admitted vandalizing the Belle Vornon home and office of Dr. J. W. a major in the Army Medical and causing damage estimated at The boys were released in the cus- tody of their parents pending a hear- ing before Judge S. John Morrow of the FayeHe County Juvenile Court. Gladd reported that Dr. who has been on duty in North Caro- returned home when apprised of the acts of vandalis-m and furnish- ed him with a lis-f of damages and de- stroyed articles. Japan In New Threat Against Lives Of Captured U. S. Airmen realized in the sale of War for and .ulatie show. For this nisht alons. the good people of Bro.Misville pur- chased tickets in the form of War Bonds for an average of 7ier and vf then we don't know wh-t is. There a total of ad- vanced for the purchase of Bonds and for the purchase by in- dividuals of other than- Bonds. and societies of the district bought and Corporations 000 making the grand total of Brownsville ha.- certainly the and Conn-ells- ville please copy. Broadcast Claims Japanese Have Made Reply To Formal Inquiries United smarting under tfie impact of mounting Superfortress raids on uttered a veiled new threat today agairo t the lives of captured American Radio Tokyo said in fofm.l replifts to Ameffcafl aixj fetitiih in- quiries abmil the tteafttrent of air had made it clear that she would hoM responsible in- ternational law those enemy airmen who are found to have delib- erately breached establi hed practices of It was on the self same grounds of of established practices of that Japan tried and execul ed of the fliers who partici- pated in the raid ted by Lt. Gfln. H. Doamtle on Tokyo April 1042. A Tokyo by the official Japanese Domei agency said Japan ha-d replied officially last Friday Kh the legation to inquir- ies received from the United States government Sept. 26 znd Britain Sept. 6. No reason was given for the delay of nearly three months i-n an wering inquiries. Dataits of the reply were said to have been disclosed today by Sadao spokesrrnft of the Board of at a press ccmfererpcf in Tokvo. PAPER COLLECTION WILL BE FINISHED HERE THIS WEEKEND The Boy Scouts of Charleroi will conclude their paper collection here Saturday. The portion of Charleroi between Sixth street and the north borough line will be canvassed Saturday and the bundles of paper which are placed at the curbs be picked up by the scouts. Trucks will be loaned for the occas- ion and adult leaders will assist the boys in the work of collecting the paper. Last week a portion of all of Maple View and North Charleroi were canvassed and paper col- lected. the town. the Ameiican.s were mopping up the la.jt enemy To the the 134th Regi- ment of Maj. Gen. Paul W. Baade's 35th Division slashed ahead miles into the out-kirts of the French fortress town of on thu German border 10 miles below Saarbruckcn. Former Bentleyville Chief Is With Patton Edward Snyder. formor chief of police at BentUyville. is a first lieu- tenant General Patton's armor- ed forces in it was learned today. He was commissioned after comple'.ing the officers' course Ft. and promoted to first ANOTHER GARAGE IS LOOTED BY GANG OF BLACK MARKET THUGS An Monorgahela garage was robSed tcmatically of tcola and other accessories valued at more credence to -a theory that a gang is preying district garages and service stations in order to supply the black market with loot. Latest victim of me Mai-Kec is the Lazzari Motors situated the East Monong-ihela end of the river bridge in Forward town- Allegheny opposite Mo- nongahela. William F. the said that he to-M by Allegheny County to whom he re- ported the that his place had been the twenty-second appar- ently by the same in recen' months. Gar go ytition robbsr- ies in Pizzica gar- age in lower Main street therp -wma broken into on the night of November Fredericktown and other Monongahela Valley commun- itiej in weeks indicate the ear.g is operating in Washington the blac-k market with gasoline tools not tires and CEMETERY WREATHS and up. HAUBE'S BIG PARTY At Italian Corner Eighth and Lookout every Something diffetetit   

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