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Charleroi Mail Newspaper Archive: November 07, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Charleroi Mail

Location: Charleroi, Pennsylvania

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   Charleroi Mail, The (Newspaper) - November 7, 1944, Charleroi, Pennsylvania                               Good Evening You can fool all of the people some of the time. Then it becomes someone else's THE OHARLEROI MAIL ESTABLISHED JUNE NINETEEN HUNDRED The Weather Clearing and warmer this after- clear and continued cool tonight. Wednesday increasing cloudiness and warmer. VOLUME 132 WASHINGTON PENNSYLVANIA. NOVEMBER 1944 FOUR CENTS CLOSE PRESIDENTIAL POLL PREDICTED T T -T Super forts Over Tokyo Claims Giant Planes Fly Over Tokyo Says Nazi Dispatch Two Superfortresses Penetrate The Kanto Fly South- ward After Iwo Raided JAPS CLAIM ATTACK ON SAIPAN ISLAND radio reports two American superfortresses over Tokyo area while carrier planes re- port destruction of 191 Japanese planes and blasting of eight or 'more ships in raids on Manila area. WESTERN and German armored forces slug it out in streets of tiny 25 miles southwest of in preliminary to winter battle of Rhineland. Soviet armies have killed Ov captured Ger- man troops on Eastern Stalin discloses as Red forces engage in great tank hattle outside Budapest. AIR British bombers raid Coblenz and Glensenkirchen. ITALY Activity increases all along front with impioving weather and Polish troops of 8th Army occupy several on Rimini-Bologna highway. By UNITED PRESS Tokyo said that two B-2'J Super- fortresses flew over the main Japan- ese home island of Honshu today for more than an presumably on reconnaissance in preparation for attacks on Tokyo and other key targets. A German DNB dispatch said the giant planes flew over Tokyo itself at noon. The two Superfortresses penetrated the in- cluding 1 p. m. Tokyo time and an hour a Japanese home broadcast re- corded by FCC monitors said. It was the third time in a week that the Japanese have reported Su- perfortresses over the Kanto area of Honshu. Japanese home broadcasts have been warning the inhabitants of Hon- shu that the reconnaissance flights presage a large-scale air offensive against Tokyo and industrial areas on the Tokyo also reported that 40 Super- fortresses raided Iwo Island in the Volcano group while Ameri- can Liberators attacked Haha and Chichi Islands in the Bonins yester- day. The Bonins lie 615 miles south- east of and the Volcano group is directly south of the Bonins. The Superfortresses flew to Hon- shu and the Volcanoes from air bases in the Tokyo said. Almost a Japanese imperial headquarters communique said Japan- ese aircraft had attacked American air bases in the group at dawn today. To I'ntro WELLSBORO CGW PLANT GETS NEW STAR ON 'E' FLAG A second1 white symbolic of continued high achievement in the production of war has been added to the Army-Navy flag at the WelUboro pknt of Corning Glass company officials' announced today. This marks the third consecu- tive 6-month period that the coveted originally awarded in Oc- tober will fly above the Wells- boro plant. Under Secretary of Robert P. in his letter of said to CGW men and maintaining the fine record which first brought you you have set an expiring example for your fel- low Americans on the production front. second renewal adds1 a second White Star to your Army-Navy Pro- To Pnire Every Wednesday evening in the Slovak Seventh St. and McKean Avenue. NAVAL MAN IS CASUALTY IN PACIFIC AREA Chief Machinist's Francis Is Victim Of Battle CALL MRS. SHEPARD 1677 Loved ones overseas want your photo. Wallet size dot. Ap- pointments 10 ITU to p. ins Nov. 20 last day to assure arrival in let- ters by Christmas. Word has been received by North Charleroi relatives of the death in action in the Pacific theatre of Francis Irwin son of Mr. and Mrs. William' I. of 564 Isabella North Charleioi. The wire from Vice Admiral Randall Jacobs uas received last week. It Mis. Sophie Louise Xoith Pa. The Nav.yi Department deeply regrets to inform you that your Francis Irwin Chief Machinist's Mate was killed in action while in the ser- vice of his country. The Depart- ment extends to you its sincerest sympathy in your great loss. On account of existing -conditions the bod.yi if recovered cannot be re- turned at present. If further de- tails are received you will be in- formed. To prevent possible aid to our enemies please do not the name of his ship or station. Vice Admiral The Chief of Naval Personnel. Chief Machinist's Mate Ward was his 'being- tir.e former Sophie Louise of Mones- sen. She survives together with a yeai-old Gregory Francis. A Thomas with the Sea- Bets in New also survives. Francis was well known in he was a graduate of Oharleroi High School. After his graduation he worked with the Fox Grocery Com- until he entered the U. S. Navy in August of 1988. He was born August 1916. No details can be given as to the manner of his death or as to the kind of vessel on which he was serving when he was killed. His family here has the deep sym- pathy of their many friends in their sad loss. Francis was a member of the Charleroi Presbyterian church and of the Veterans of Foreign Wars Post. VERY HEAVY VOTING IN VALLEY DISTRICT Clu-rleroi and Donora were leading the valley in a vote which increasing hourly today skies turned sunny and made for a perfect clay to out the Charleroi's Fourth Precinct at noon had 147 some 20 per cent better than normal. The vote in Charleroi at 1 p. m. w..-s near 900. At p. m. a total of 229 had been cast in the First 230 in' the Second. The Fifth had 216 at p. m. In the 1940 Roosevelt Willkie cam paign Charleroi cast for Roose- velt and for Willkie. Packard Motors Strike Closes Detroit Plant Nov. 7 The Packard Motor Car Co. plant was closed today after several hundred metal members of the United Auto Workers Union refused to work in what the company termed a of ar- gument that started Friday. SENIOR CLASS WILL PRESENT PLAY SHORTLY Produced High Auditorium On Nov. 21-22 Tht_- Senior High School again present a John B. Rodgers Many of these fine productions have been given in past years in under sponsorship of the schools and of other community and all have- been most splendidly received and also supported by the paironizing' pub- lic. Hej Stranger will be no excep- tion. The public performances will be presented the evenings of November and Nov- ember beginning at p. m. With the arrival of the Mr. and Mrs. Harry S. re- hearsals have already begun for this western musical comedy In fr.cTe wiTi be four two for the Elementary one for 'the 'Junior High and one for the Senior High School. has been aptly de- scribed as delightfully different from the usual run of shows and especially now because of the aviation element involved. A cast of 17 speak- ing several singing and dancing together with ensembles and represents a total cast of some one hundred high school stu- dents. The profits from the this musical comedy on the part of the Senior High School will be used to carry on with certain of their worthwhile program of extra-curricular activities. From time 10 the patronizing public will be informed of the progress of this show and of some of the high- lights personalities includ- catchy tunes to be and of when and how to secure tick- ets for the two evening performances. Set aside calendar of ac- tivities the two Nov- ember and November 22. You will enjoy the fun and the good-natured frivolity of an evening- spent seeting and hearing Stran- DAUGHTER OF MOVIE COMEDIAN IS CRITICAL HOLLYWOOD Mary 13- Come-dian Joe E. critical condition received in an Saturday night Nov. year-old daughter of remained in today from injuries automobile BARBER SHOPf CLOSED All Day Armistice Day. Open Ffl- day evening until 9 o'clock. Very Heavy Voting In Reported Nov. the basis of early reports receiv- ed from a large number of the 243 county county commission- ers announced at noon today that the voting in Westmoreland County was In rural districts heavy voting was also the order as in some polling places voters stood in line before 7 o'clock this morning waiting for the polls to open. At noon today votes cast in Greens- burg were at least twice as large as during morning hours of the 1943 election. The total number of voted military ballots received from Westmoreland County men in the ser- vice jumped to today. Dr. A. W. Manager Of I R. W. Foster Is Advanced SOVIET FORCES IN TANK BATTLE NEAR BUDAPEST Marshal Josef Stalin Discloses The Great Loss Of Nazi Forces In a series of organization changes announced today at the Corning Glass Works Charleroi Dr. Arthur W. Wishart was appointed productio7i a new position in the plant required by the urgent glassmaking requirements of an expanding organi- zation. Dr. Wishart comes to Charleroi from W. where he was manager of the Corning Glass Works Optical Glass Plant in that locality. He received his education at the University of Minnesota where he was awarded a Bachelor of Chemistry degree in 1933 and a Doctor of Phil- osophy degree in physical chemistry in 1937. From until Dr. Wishart was employed as a research chemist for the Brown Company in New after which he joined the Corning Glass Works Research Laboratory in N. York.. In he left the Glass Works to work on a project in the Agricultural By- Products Laboratory of the U. S. De- partment of Agriculture. He return- ed to the Corning Laboratory in Feb- ruary of 1942 and was appointed man- ager of the Parkersburg Division in 1943. In another organization R. W. Foster assumes responsibility for including cost cost ac- administration of the bud- get and payroll department. Mr. Fos- ter joined the Macbeth-Evans Glass Company in in as cost clerk. In he was transferred to N. in the cost accounting department and after one year moved to CI urn To Piiice S Column Gov. Martin And Wife Vote At Washington Nov. Edward Martin cast his ballot at the East Washington Borough polls this morning where he' was joined later by Mrs. Martin. The Gov- ernor and Mrs. Martin left for Harris- burg at noon. Election Returns To speed the work of tabulating the county and district offic- ials and workers in all voting pre- cincts in the Charleroi vicinity are urged to report immediately. After your precinct vote is com- call Charleroi 76 or The Mail office. Cooperation of officials at vot- ing booths and Mail correspond- ents will again r.ssure a complete unofficial report as soon as pos- sible. The Mail office will remain open throughout the night to receive and tabulate the vote. New Gasoline Ration Stamp A Due For Use Beginning Thursday 13 A Series Effective Under Equalization' Plan Of Federal Oov. Motoiists here in the Eastern ration zone will use the newly issued gasoline ration book for the first time November equaliz- ing the u-e of the basic ration coupon in the nation for the first time in many months. On that ration holders' all over the country will be using the same series of the number 13-A coupons. The equalization was brought about by the OPA announcement that nCA- books would be issued to Eastern bJsic ration holders sooner than or- iginally scheduled. Motorists here in this ration zone were currently sched- uled to receive new books for use on February when coupons IA the oldl book all expired. But with the expiration of the cur- rently valid 11-A it was stat- ed that the new 13-A coupons would become skipping the 12-A ser- ies entirely. As motorists outside the East are already using the 13-A thh.i means th.t after Novem- ber all A holders will be using the common A-13 stamp. With the issuance of the new Eastern motorists received books with three of the 13 A coupons- voided. The remaining three will last the six weeks until the expiration date of all the 13-A coupons ora December 21. The remaining coupon series in the new both in and outside the are in groups of six coupons worth four gallons of gasoline per coupon. This will be equivalent to the old strip of 8 valid for 3 gallons Oh December A-14 couponi will becoftie for card everywhere for the purchase of these will expire March Nov. Vi.tor- iou- Soviia -irmie.s have killed or cap- lured German on the eastern Marshal Jo-ef Stalin disclosed loday as his forces engaged tht pnemy in a great tank battle out- side l.st -atellite cap- in Europe. reported thct the were bringing up strong motorized ioini-itiaiiT for a final assault on Buda- and claimed that other Soviet forces had made two attempts to cross the Danube in an effort to swing i.round the rear of the in an order of the day ob- serving the 27th anniversary of the Red said the German- violated frontier had been restored for its entire length from the 'Black Sea to the Barents and trium- phantly aim now to smash Hitlerite Germany by the crushing pressure of the Allied Stalin disclosed that the two sum mer offensives which carried Soviet troops into East pushed the Germans back to Warsaw and liber- ated Romania and cost the Germans killed or captured. On June German casualties for the first three years' of the eastern campaign were set at thus bringing the total to for lesi than three and a half years of r- ._. Soviet forces liberated of milr lions of persons from the yoke of Stalin and together witn Allied armies have taken up positions a decisive offensive on the life center of Although the regular communique for the first time Oct. 2 reported essential ch- ngeo on the military dispatches said the battle before Budapest had reached as the Germans made ...n llth hour attempt to halt Marshal Rodion Y. Malinovsky's 2nd Ukrain- i..M army. reporUs also spoke of fighting at Budapest but claimed that Nazi had hampere.l the drive' by cutting the supply line between Budapest and 43 miles to the southeast. ROOSEVELT VOTES AS 'TREE GROWER1 TODAY HYDE N. Nov. Franklin D. Roone- velt voted for Franklin D. Roosevelt for president today for the- fourth time. Tne cast his vote in the old' Hyde Park town hall where he made his first political speech in 1910 who a young lawyer runr.'ing for the NCA- York state legisl-ture. Mr. Roosevelt drove from his home with hi5 family in an open touring reached the hall at P. visiting en route with the children of Hvde Park elementarv school. TWO FLIERS KILLED IN CRASH OF PLANE CAMP Nov. 7- Army fliers were killed today when a two-seater Army train- er pkne crashed about five miles southwest of here. The plane was on a combat training Camp Springs officials and the accid-ent is being investigated by Army Air Force officers. The Army is withholding the names of the plane's occupants until the next of kin have been notified. BUTLER MAN KILLED IN PLUNGE PLANE Nov. Sergeant Ensign M. 21. of was one of five killed when the bomber in which he was flying broke up and plunged into the North Sea on the return from a bombing raid over the War Department announced. He had been missinp ir action since June 21 of this year. Foui of the crew were saved. GRAND NEW PARTY Every Tuesday St. Je- rome's Auspices Columbus Clofc. Adfttiiilon It.ftO. Millions Awaiting Outcome Of Voting For U. S. President BATTLE RAGES IN TANKS ADVANCE First Wartime Presidential Pol Since Score Of States Listed As Doubtful In Voting Heavy Blazing See-Saw Battle Thought Preliminary To Winter Campaign Nov. VioU-nt and indecisive fighting raged all day today in the streets of Vo.s.senack where strong German forces battled in vain to cut off the deepest American spear- head in Germany and isolate the Fir.st Army troops at its tip to the south- east. As Allied armies virtually complet- ed their triumph in Southwe.st Hol- supreme headquarters reported that the German IrJth Army lost to 4G.OOO men on that front in the last month. Berlin reported that the Allies had crossed to Schouwen tht cen- tr-il of the four large Dutch inlands the southwest coast. The reported ciossing apparently was made from the adjacent St. Filipsland which Canadian troops had occupied. British Commandos on Walcheren captured the Zeeland provincial capi- tal of Middelburg alojig three miles to the northeast. Other British forces seized on the south bank of the Holland Deep 16 miles south of while American troops drove into only remaining enemy pocket of the Deep. The British were slogging through flooded swamps in Northwest Wal- cheren to complete the mop-up of the whose occupation opened the Schelde approaches to Antwerp Lo Allied minesweepers. Some Ger- man prisoners already have been rounded up on Walcheren and adjoin- ing fa'eveland. To I'nKr 4. CAMPAIGN FINALLY ENDED LAST NIGH1 NEW Nov. An early morning flurry of eastern wai plant voles launched nation today into its first wartinH presidential election since 1864 brought an end to the bitter presiden lial campaign of Franklin Koose veil and Thomas E- Dewey. generally was clear chilly except for rains in the Sootb west and Western Mountain Slates This favored a heavy turnout o rural voters. Lines of voters awaited the open ing of polls in New York's Brooklyi Korough and in industrialized dis tricts of Baltimore. Colum More Turkeys Sure For Civilians' Use Nov. With 500 million pounds of dressed turkeys assured for military a more plentiful supply for civilian con- sumption was according to an announcement today by William F. area war food administrator. Walsh said a meeting of district turkey producers will be held Thurs- day night to clarify prospects for supplying civilian demands. Both pro- ducers and WFA agreed the turkey supply will be sufficient'to meet civil- ian needs for Christmas and New years' dinners. SCOOTERS MEET IN CHARLEROI TONIGHT The regular monthly meeting of the Charleroi District Committee of the Boy Scouts of America will be held tonieht at the Charleroi Prcsby- forian at S o'clock Business of importance will be up for consideration tnd all members '..re urged to be present. NAZI SHIPPING IN AEGEAN LIQUIDATED Nov. British nav- al officials announced today that ef- fective German shipping in the Aeg- ean Sea could be considered Only a few stray ships still hiding in German island harbors out of what one year ago was a major shipping- forces of not including innumerable small craft operated by the N'azis. Seen This Morning anti-freeze for winter. Allied Fund poster for a local industry. Ptnn getting a frosty workout. First Mass. Town Returns Counted MOUNT Mount Washing- the first Massachusetts town to report complete today gave-. Roosevelt In the town gave Roosevelt Willkie Philadelphia and other cities. 1 had voted by 8 t two hours after the pol and by A. M. almost oni third of the registered voters had cai their ballols in at least three pollin places. Brooklyn's registration wi Although the rural voting- WH.I slow in gaining thei were some exceptions. Fifteen pi cent Of '-'he registered voters had mac their choices in the rural commun tics of New York's Suffolk County I 10 A. M. Most states expected the Vote to 1 less than in due to the of men In the armed but wa lime industrial shifts may the size of'the vote in some localise Rain -was reported or predicted i Kansas and Texa although it was not expected to hai much influence on the voting trend. Early voting also was tremely heavy in highly industrialize Detroit. In Western Pennsylvani. some polling places were piling u votes at the rate of a Throughout the citizer were txercising their secret balk rights in 140.-198 voting precincts. It is a rare ond rigid test of ot democracy. The men and viome'n the armed services have been votin To 3. FINAL ANALYSIS SHOWS MAJOR CO ELECTION TILTS Justice Congrew Ai Legislative Fights Are In Voters Hands Federal and itate and resentatives in Congress and the Gei eral Assembly are being voted UJM by citizens of County i they go to the polls today. Governor Ed-ward Martin last night to his home in WnihingU from Harrisburg to remain until 1 has cast his ballot. feel very confident Pennsylvan will go the stated in Harrijburg. is the Governor Martin has plsyed a To rnRf J. FISH AND OTSTERS Served every day. Sam's RestM 52S McKean Avenue. PARTY St. Jerome's Thursday t Nov. 8 o'clock. 500. Euchre. Atfmission   

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