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Bradford Star Record: Friday, September 1, 1922 - Page 1

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   Bradford Star-Record (Newspaper) - September 1, 1922, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                Jdwme also Includes the If IUr IPUflRY lidnapping of Children "'wC-'llWUIlI of the Railway Executives-Arrests Expected Momentarily. IS DEDICATED The new state armory at Kane was dedicated yesterday with formal ceremonies.   The program began at 3.30 o'clock and the following took part in ra �___^  C3T-.4- 1    TVvrtmU- ! the program:    Major General C. H. Chicago, Sept. 1-Depart-; Bailey commandcr-o� the Third Corpa ment of Justiee operatives Area, D. S, regular army; Major Gen-today were on a still hunt j"! G?!*fnp- *ickards'      Tof the t-�               j      j'    i   � i    Federal Militia bureau; Hon. Joseph for  Reds   ana radicals *Ol- .W. Bouton, presiding judge of the Mc-lo\dUff the alleged diSCOVery IKean county courts'; Hon. Frank E. �       i .  j     i - j___ I'll 'Baldwin, state senacor from the 25th of a plot to Kionap or kiu | dlstrict. brlgadier General Edward Martin ot the state armory board, and �Major Monroe. A. Meana, president of the Kane armory board. A dinner was served to 100 guests at the Kane Country club and at 8,30 a reception and dance was held in the armory. The drill hall is 81x36 feet with ceiling 14 feet high. The foundation walls are of concrcte.and the structure of brick and stone with steel supporting frame. The building is one story in height with a- basement finished with lockers, baths and other conveniences for the guardsmen. -The hall was built, C5 feet back of WHIT SHIPMENTS WILL BE CURTAILED BEGS BY DAY BUT RIDES IN CARAT NIGHT DAY CELEBRATION Owing to Shopmen's Strike Railroads of Country will be Operated on War Time Regulations During Winter the presidents of the New York Central, Pennsylvania and Rock Island railroads The identity of one of the plotters was said to-be known and hie arrest was expected momentarily.. The; president of the New York 'Central is A. H. Smith, the president of the Pennsylva-uia is Samuel Bea, and the Nresident' of the ChicAgo;? l fames E! Gorman.1 !.' According to'the police department instructions from the plotter to "red" lieutenants have been found in which the lieutenants are asked to look up the home addresses of the three railroad presidents named and "learn if they have any children -so we can either, kill or kidnap them and take the children." It was said' that the radicals being �ught are all foreigners. Several Reported Drowned When Cars Plunge Into Swollen Stream Cape Girardou, Mo.. Sept. 1.-Several persons were reported to have been drowned early today when a southbound Frisco train went Into the river at Star Landing,. 30 miles north of here. Telegraph lines between here and Star Landing are down due to a cloud burst. Details are lacking-Belief Train Starts for Wreck. St. Louis, Sept. 2.-Division officials of the St. Louis & San Francisco rail-roed, relief workers and doctors left By GEORGE R. HOLMES Washington, Sept. 1.-The country can look forward to a gloomy winter of virtual wartime regulations of the whole railroad system, government transportation experts agreed today. Even if the prolonged strike of railway shopmen was settled next week,  which  is  not  all  likely,  the j*e .streetline, -wWctt Uvea, ample I here at � o'clock thismorning lor Star j and. a well* rotjsJ*. set of room fpr the construction of the ad-) Ending, where a Frisco "passenger!,,n,DS and (Toes-i Beggar Said to Make Large Amount Selling Pencils-Spends Winters in Florida New York,  Sept.   1.-Advertising.     _____   ________       ............. the spice of most trades, is the one tremendous burden placed on the car-thing Hortpn A. Malone, legless pen- riers as a result of stoppage of repairs cil vender fears will send him to the the acute coal shortage and the sea-Potter's field. K Bona! movement of crops, would be During the balmy days of summer Malone rolls up and down the midway on a roller seat. His legs, lost in a railroad accident, are off near the knees. In one hand he beseeches the passerby with a bundle of pencils; into a hat, carried in the other, pours a continual stream of nickels and dimes. In   the   evening   Malone   retires to his suite in a Broadway hotel, en-        _ f joys a hot bath, puts on fine clothes^rijads of i ii\inistr4tiori department of the arm ory, which it is'confidently expected will be provided for within a few years. BRIDE-ELECT HONOR GUEST Misses Virginia Burdick and Gladys Hanley Entertain for Miss Margaret Christie Charming in its appointments was the luncheon party given this afternoon by Miss Virginia Burdick and Miss Gladys Hanley at the Countries!) in compliment to Miss Margaret Christie, who will    be    married to [,9ewge H. R-oraird in the near future. .The luncheon was served at 1 o'clock �t tables very handsomely embellished -some in yellow and others in blue. An abundance of garden flowers and Mue and yellow candles were used in he decorations. Covers were laid for JO. Following the luncheon bridge was Mayed, live tables being in play. Miss Christie was presented with very b,elj- gifts by her two hostesses. FAIL TO PROVE THEIR CHARGES Mothers Bring your boys and girls to our store tomorrow for their school shoes. We will save you at least 25 per cent, on your shoe bill. Tlw place, Oppenheim & Sift. xl-l� Kane, Sept. 1.-Charged by Pennsylvania railroad authorities with throwing stones at men employed' in the railroad shops here who are taking the place of strikers, Dewey Holland was given a hearing at 11 o'clock last evening, while they were en route yesterday forenoon before Justice W. to Harrisburg from Erie, where they H. Bunce, arid discharged. | had attended   the   unveiling of the The alleged offense is said to have statue of George Washington, which occurred Tuesday night when strike- , took place at Waterford yesterday. train was reported to have plunged into the river early today. . Details of the accident were lacking here owing to disrupted telegraph communication. GOV. SPROUL MAKES SHORT STOP IN KANE sufficient to insure months of strict regulation of shipping, it was said! For all practical purposes, the railroads of the country today are operating under war time restrictions. The last emergency order of the Interstate Commerce Commission extending its priorities powers to in- Bandits Shoot Police Officers in Fight at Kansas City Kansas City, Mo., Sept. 1.-Two. police officers, Sergeant Elmer Biggs, 61, and Fred Wheeler, 36. were shot and elude the western half of the United, wiled in a gun battle with bandits States, brought  the nation's   entire! /        . transportation system under govern-j       toaay. _ meht direction.   As Jn the war, th�T -        "*       I- b clotheaXro^ds ofTUie. country are for all prac- f ling wlttiTTrauaportatTqn* system   with ^nter-l breakers were stoned while walking in the Penns5*lvania yards were; it being alleged that the stones were- thrown from the Poplar street bridge. Justice Bunce after hearing the testimony of four witnesses decided that there was not sufficient evidence against the young man to warrant holding him for court. District Attorney E. G. Potter of Smcthport was here and conducted the prosecution's side of the case. It is alleged that men imported to this city to take the places of striking shopmen are occasionally subject to annoyances of one kind or another, but this is the first time that the railroad company has sought the aid of the law in protecting the men who are housed and fed on the railroad company's property. it*automobillng his wife. ' changeable equipment and with the The winters are spent in the south, government dictating the movement where he has a doll stand at fairs. of essentials-food and fuel-before 'All this came out when Malohe's all other commodities- �Beaumpllon chauffeur. - was arrested. Detectives [ of anthracite production which Is said they found some hypodermic confidently expected next week will needles in the car. A dispute rose throw fresh burdens upon the crip-over the payment' of lawyers' fees,' pled carriers. Anthracite bins when Malone. came to the rescue of throughout the country are bare as his chauffeur. His car was attached a result of five months' stoppage of for the bill. i producing and the full priority po\V- |   Malone bewailed the publicity he's j ers of the Interstate Commerce Corn-Kane, Pa.. Sept. 1.-There was quite' �etUn?:- J.?*? Papers -win ,j,lay ' me mteslon' -will be devoted to hurrying a crowd at the Pennsylvania station to I up af a "ch � > END OF STRIKE BY INJUNCTION pencil vending. BIG DRY RAID IN WARREN CO. government officials are now confin ing their discussion to coal production and movement of essentials, The   danger   of   a spread of the shopmen's strike to other classes of railroad labor, however, is clearly re-- (cognized by President   Harding and Acting under df- j members of his Cabinet.   It is recog Warren, Sept. 1. , ----. K__, rection  of District Attorney L.  C. ! nized, too, that dissatisfaction among Eddy, and Sheriff W. Vt. Muir of this' these other classes Is bound to grow county, Hi. W. Gosser of Erie, Pa.,1 in some degree, as a result of having national prohibition group head for, to work with impaired equipment and j sorry that he could not stop over, but tnis district, staged a wholesale raid under strike conditions.   The dissat (hoped that at some future time he jn Warren county yesterday, during. isfactibn   is most   marked in those could pay Kane and her people a which 24 men and women were taken | unions which  already have experl-visit. ' into custody charged with violations! enced wage cuts at the hands of the As the train slowly left the station of the Woner act of 1921, in the man- Railway Labor Board-the Mainten-the executive and party stood on the  ofacture, sale, furnishing and unlaw-jance of Way Men, Telegraphers, Sig platform waving farewell.  -�..! �     -� 8 Styles Growing Girls' Oxfords $5.95 and $6.95. New fall styles and guaranteed. Ralph's Boot Shop, 82 Main. xl-l� Eddie Stone "Playing the Saw" Bradford Six Labor Day. Olympic Dance-Armory. xl-l� Olympic Club Dance . -Ubor Day at the Armory. "The Bradford Six."    xl-l� Baseball Sanday. ^ne at Rlxford-3.30 p. m. xl-lc* Aato Oil and Gasoline. ;ts^by Bradford Garage. Walrath Crescent Garage and Uachine Teral Garaee Co.. J. E. MaCatt ji"-. Ideal Garage. H. n. McCord, Mt>: H. D, Marsh. Farmers Val- !'* im.w.f* Labor Day Olympic Club Dance r'The Bradford Six" At the Armory. SPAKGLER'S SPECIALS. Finest Creamery Butter, 38c. ' Good oleomargarine, 3 lb. roll, CO. Peanut butter, 10 lb. pail, $1.50. Fine home killed chickens. Cnoice Home Killed Veal. Veal stew, 20; shoulder, 25. Veal chops. 30; veal roasts, 30. Finest Young Lamb. Lamb legs 35; lamb chops, 35. Boneless roast lamb, 35. -Lamb stews, 15; shoulders, 25. Fine Western Beef. Boneless rump roasts, 25. Fine pot roasts, 15-lB-gO. Good boiling pieces, 8 and 10, Fresh hamburg steak, 15; 2 for fti. Home made sausage, IS; 2 for 26. "fresh hams, 30; spare rlba, 20. Fresh pork shoulders, 20. Finest smoked meats--Hams-Large; whole or half, 2%. Hams-Small and lean, 30. Fine small calla hams, 18. Bold Quality bacon, 25; Dixie, 22. Fresh bologna and weiners, 15. Presh liverwurst, 10: Cheese.  OJtves.  Pickles. Hot house letttte^. Closed All Day La bar Day. THE BIG BARGAIN MARffiST. Another Conference Suggested. Paris, Sept. 1.-An immediate conference upon allied war debts with the United States actively participating, was proposed in a note sent to Great Britain today by France. Silk and Wool or All Wool Hosiery. .Phoenix-the World's Best $1.50 to $3:60 the pair. Ralph's Boot Shop. &2 Main. " xl-l� New Crop Golden Bantam Corn For Labor Day-AH the vegetables for that big dinner. Get it fresh picked at Ross Farm Market Gardens. 142 West Corydon street. i;     xl-i* Baseball Sunday.   '' Kane at Rixford-3.30 p. m. /       -.    xl-lc� .' Rubcnstcin's Specials. This |� the best time Jn the year to Set nice home grown beef at Rubeij-steln'a Meat Market, Prices are .low> Came early and .pick your beef and nice veal.'   Sirloin steak, ?5e; boiling ful possession of intoxicating liquor for beverage purposes. Arhuckle lo UndergOvOperatlon. Tokio, Sept. 1-:Roscoe "Fatty" Ar buckle, film comedian, who was ban ned from the screen by Will Hays following his sensational trial in San Francisco in connection with the death of Virginia Rappe, will undergo a surgical operation immediately upon his arrival here. Arbuckle wirelessed from the liner' today that an operation would be necessary upon reaching Tokio, requesting that hospital arrangements be made. The message did not state the nature of the operation. 7 Styles Men's Fall Shoes, $5.95. Goodyear welt and guaranteed. Ralph's Boot Shop, 82 Main. xl-l� Labor Day Dance Monday nigh't, Ljmegtqne. *l-2c� -s---�� j. n AmiouBcempnt. The Chamberlin Metal Weather meat, 12c: roast, 15c; hamburger, 2  strip eo. has opened an offloe in the for 26c; fresh veal.-wl .roast, 20c.1 Auerhaim building;, where represen-Corner Peart and Washington streets. J tauves wjii be on hand to answer tn- Dance at Murty's -Grove Saturday night.      l-2c* - -, ' Labor Day Dance At Rock City Park, Monday," Sept. 4- Oeo W" fipsngler, Mgr. 100 Main St. Dancing afternoon and evenimr. After-- xl-J*   l,BOfn I te � Bvenlnf 8 tp It.- x�,?. qutrieg am} receive, orders. Phone 30T. xSl-Sc Miss Clementine Wise Will, resume her music classes September 1. Registration can be made on or after.Friday.Sept. 1, at 88 West Corydon street, where her studio will nalmen. Switchmen, etc., rather than in the four powerful brotherhoods of train operatives. Nova Scotia Coal Strike Settled Halifax, N. S., Sept. 1.-The two weeks' strike of the ten" thousand Nova Scotia coal miners was ended today by British acceptance of the wage offer of the British Empire Steel corporation. Troops guarding the mine district were ordered withdrawn. The strike meant a loss in output of 250,000 tons of coal; loss in wages of $750,000 and $1,250,000 loss to the company. Phoenix Hose for Men, Women and Children-The World's Best. Sold only at Ralph's Boot Shop. xl-l� On Saturday-Special baked food sale-pies, cakes, rolls, buns, etc., at Wisteria Shop. 17 Kennedy Street. xl-lc* FOR SALE:-Truck or dairy farm, SI acres, level land, Good location. Reasonable terms- Address P. Star. x31-3c� Baseball Sanday. Kane at Rixford-3.30 p.'m. xl-lc� be looked. Prepare for Labor Day. Saturday morning we will have at the  Public Market spring chicken, heavy hens, fancy whjte potatoes, Bartlett pears. qpp'�V Bantam corn, cucumbers, tomatoes and ctlery.   p. a|0rjc� U PaHley. xl-ic� Chicago,  Sept.   1.-Federal  Judge "Wilkerson today granted a blanket I injunction against the striking shop- __.,.        _ -~ _        _       I men, asked for by Attorney General William Sample, Left Huge Daugherty on complaint of the Unl-Qiim   Pminrl in Ranfrlrnlr   tecl States of America.   A hearing to aum, founa in isangKOKtj mak6 tne order nprTnaT,.nt WM Siam; Many "Samples" Appear Poplar Bluff, Mo., Sept. 1.-After a world-wide search for William Sample, heir to a fortune estimated at $2,-500,000, lasting for four months, the new millionaire was found on a steamship in the, harbor of Bankok, Siam, ready to sail to America for a visit to his home in southeast Missouri. George Plnd of Cape Girardeau has been conducting the search in order that he might turn over the vast fortune to its owner. The fortune was left to Sample by relatives who died recently. As news of the search for Sample found its way in every nook and corner of the globe, hundreds of "William Samples" applied to Pind for the money. When they would arrive at Cape Girardeau and find Pind, the latter would make them turn around and he would look at the backs ot their necks .before making any statement. Pind stated, after the rightful owner of the fortune was located, that the rightful owner had a scare on the back of his neck and that this mark would be the deciding factor in ascertaining make the order permanent was set for September 11. Under the construction placed upon the phraseology by some legal authorities, it was said the government could, if it so desired, now proceed to order shop craft leaders to call off the strike on the ground that it was interfering with interstate commerce and the United States mails. Failure to comply would lead to arrest. The Attorney General said the American people were face to face with a great peril. TWO BOUTS FOR ONE ADMISSION Nashvillle. Tenn., Sept. 1.-Jack Wray, gentleman of color from Evansville, got peeved In the second round of his bout with "Battling Jim" Johnson, black, of Nashville. Wray thought "Hard Boiled" Brown, a negro referee, was not giving him a square deal. Wray stopped fighting Johnson and squared off with the referee. Wray hooked a right for the re"-feree's jaw, but missed and the referee came back with a snappy right to the one William Sample for whom he |the nose which sent Wray down for was searching. When he was found. Sample said the count. After Wfray had "been revived ho he had been in Siam for a number of continued the fight with Johnson and years and did not know of the search j WOn tne decision in eight rounds. being conducted for him. He appeared to be greatly pleased with the news of his newly acquired millions and could hardly wait until his boat left for America. He was found by an amateur detective, who had been assigned to assist in locating Sample. The detective, according to Pind, was paid $5,000 for his successful search. A" greate part of the legacy acquired by Sample is in a diamond mine in South Africa, it is claimed. School Shoes Ot the Better Grade $2.95 to-$6.00. Ralph's Boot Shop, 82 Main. xl-l� Best Place on Earth to Buy Meats. Beef plate and short ribs, 10-12%. Shoulder and pot roast, 15-18-20. Fresh cut hamburg steak, 15. Home-made bologna and weiners. Home made sausage.'   Home dressed chickens. ' Might-e-Nice brand butter^ 1 lb. prints fresh daffy, 4Qe. Bacon squares^ JOo., Fred J. Carver ft Co., 105 Main. -�' x2-l� Labor Day Dance At Rock City Park. Monday. Sept. 4. Dancing afternoon and.evening. Afternoon 3 to 6. Evening S to 12.    xl-2* A Real Treat Tomorrow. 10 new fall styles of fall footwear $10 values, $7.85. At Oppenheim ft Biffs, The House of Shoe Values. xl-1* . Celebrate Labor Day Night At Limestone dance. Six-piece 'i~ orchestra.       xl-2c* Labor Day Dance At Rock City Park,-Monday. Sept. 41 Dancing afternoon and evening. Afternoon 3 to 6. Evening 8 to 12.    xl-2* Notice. All members of Organized Labor requested to meet at Trades Assembly hall Sunday night at 7 o'clock to attend services at the M. E. church. xl-1?     F.E. Putnam. Secretary.' Men's FlorglielBa Sboea and Oxferdfe. Sold only at Ralph's Boot Shop.  ' ...   . xl-l�- COME TO KLM PLACE for your BARTLETT PEARS tl.M A BUSHEL. L. W. Cowden. Fredonai, N. T. Berry Street.     x*l-2d� 76   

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