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   Bradford Era, The (Newspaper) - November 8, 1947, Bradford, Pennsylvania                               The Weather: Cloudy, Windy Colder far UM BMt te BaJto Entertainment Listen to WEBB, Own Button, UM MI Dial VOL. 71. NO. 5. (ESTABLISHED 1877) BRADFORD, PA., SATURDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 8, 1947. (FULL ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICES) PRICE FIVE CENTS. Poultryless Thursday Program Suspended Air General Denies Requesting Hughes Loan in Wartime (Jen. Hughes Offered Him Pontwir Job in 1944 and Admits Plum-maker for Loan Year Washington- (AP) -A fast-talking retired Air Force gen- eral vigorously disputed yesterday testimony that he tried during the war to borrow from plane-maker Howard Hughes. He did say he tried to borrow this amount from htm earlier this year, general. Bennett E. Meyers, alao told a Senate War Investigate Subcommittee that while he was on an official Inspection of Hushes' California plant In 1B44, Hughes otiercd htm a postwar Job In which he "could write my own ticket" as to salary. Many Job Offers Made "People offered Jobs to me all the time." Meyers said, -nicy didn't mean a thing to me. I was onlv Interested In winning the war." wltneaa also and petite blonde wife backed him that Mm. Meyers slipped an envelope containing Into the pocket of Johnny Meyer. Hughes public man, In repayment of travel and hotel expenses. But Meyer took the wltneaa aland briefly and flatly contradicted them both. developments thick srid fast, with Hughes In town scaln to resume hla testimony, probably neit week, m the investi- gation of his wartime contracts. Hsghes Toirlraet Opposed Before (retting to the Jobs-loan- expense testimony, Meyera testi- fied that: D 1. He opposed the granting of a contract to Hughes In 1M4 to build photo planes btit had been overruled by Oen. H.. H. Arnold and after that went along like a food soldier. I. The late Harry L. Hopkins, adviser to President Roosevelt, caned him to the White Hovise and there told him It was "an outrage" that the Army had no modern photo planes. He said Hopkins "wanted to know where the Air Force has been all these years and why H didn't get wise to Itself." Meyers said It was obvious that Hopkins had been listening to Elliott Roosevelt, then In charge of photo reconnaissance In Europe. Hughes had some "very pow err.il frlendi" exerting pressure in behalf of his efforts to gel war contracts From confidential mem nranda he Identified as the late President Roosevelt, Jesse H .tones, former Reconstruction Fin ance Corporation chief, and others Meyers, now retired after JO years In the Army, dealt at one time during the recent war with aircraft procurement. He was dep- uty assistant chief of the Air Staff A mish Farmer Gets in Damaes O. A common plea court Jury Friday awarded a 33- year-old Amlsh farmer 35.000 In Woman Named To High Post In Romania Bucharest Anna Pauker seasoned woman Communist leader and one of the architects of the new International Communist In- formation Bureau, became Roman- Jan foreign minister Friday In a cabinet reorganization which con- siderably tightened leftist contro of the government. (fine Is believed to be the firs woman ever to head a foreign Mms. Pauker succeeds Oheorgh Tatareseu, who resigned Thursday with three other' non-Communls National Liberal Party minister after parliament had voted no con fldence In Tatareseu. This development was a direct re suit of testimony at the treason trial of Peasant Party leader Jullt Msnlu and 18 ethers to the effec that some of the defendants oh Utned secret documents from Tat arescu's ministry and allegedly pas sed them along to American of ficlals. The trial, which started Oct 39, recessed until Monday. Mme. Pauker was sworn Into of flee with three other new mln Isters and four undersecretaries i the presence of King Mlhal I. Other ministers Inducted ar Luca, a Communist, minis ter of Finance: Theodor lorda chescu, Socialist, Public Works, an Stancu Stolan, Ploughman's Fror, minister of Cults The new undersecretaries ar Oeorge Vatlllchl, Communist, Na- tional Education: Ion Popescu, La- bor and Social Party, Insurance: Vaslle Modoran, National Peasant Party. Finance, and Mlhai Macadcs- cu, Socialist, Cooperatives. U.S. Asks UN Seats For Six Countries Lake Huceees Demands by the United States plus small and medium powers for admission of Italy, Austria, Ireland, Portugal, Finland and Transjordan to mem- bership In the United Nations Fri- day revived the U. N. squabble over the veto privilege of the Big Five. Adlat Stevenson, United States First War Groom-to-Be in V. S. ARRIVING LaGuardlr airport, New Vork City, Wllhclm Mueller of Frankfort, Germany, IL greeted by fiancee, Thclma Domerlan of Taunton, Mann. They flrat met In Iloaton before World War 11. They met attain In Park In IMS when Domerlan was a V. S. Army nurse and Mueller a prisoner of war. Mueller'i wife and chil- dren were killed In the air bombing of Leipzig. (International) damages after he contended four church offic.als had Imposed an Amlsh "mite" or boycott against rum and thn; he had been socially In the pa.M five yciirs. addition, Judge Walter J. Mousey granted an Injunction re- straining the (our churchmen from imposing any boycotts against An- drew J. Voder which would deny him the right of religious liberty or cut him off from any social or busi- ness relations with his fellow church members. Yoder testified the boycott was imposed after he transferred his membership from the Helmuth dis- trict church to the more liberal Bunker Hill district congregation. He explained he made the transfer he wanted to buy an auto- mobile to his Invalid dauphin foi medical treatment. Regulations of the Helimiih church loroid ownership or operation of an automobile. (tovcrnmrnt Defeated In IMiin to Jail Kx-WAC C'harleilim. W. Va. The KOV' eminent Friday loii a round In Its attempt to haxe former WAC dipt. Kathleen Nash Duriuil sent back to n live-year sentence lor of the Hc.'ne crown jmel MI lie from Kronberg Castle :n Germany r'aeia! Juris? Ben Moore over- ruled motion to reopen the hear- on a habeas carpus writ with which he released Mm. Duiunt Sept. 1ft the Federal Reformatory alternate delegate, and Dr. Jose Arce, of Argentina, struck repeated- ly at the Russian vetoes which, have barred the admission of the six na- tions. Ten of Russia's 33 vetoes In the Security Council have been In- voked against applicants for mem- bership. Dr. Oscar Lange, of Poland, who generally votes In the Security Council with the Soviet Union, spoke against admitting the six countries and suggested that the Big Five get together on what nations could pass the Security Council test. American Observer Says Chinese Reds Victorious Shanghai As inconclusive skirmishes were reported yesterday In Manchuria, an American obser- ver newly returned from that wintry war front expressed the pplnion that the Chinese Communists "have lost the campaign but have gained the victory." The offensive of the past six weeks, the Communists' sixth since the Japanese surrender, apparently cost them more losses than govern- ment forces suffered, he explained but further damaged the shaky ec- onomy, demoralized defending troops. Coast Guard Races to Aid Of Freighter MuHkexoii, Clch, The 300- foot freighter Jupiter with 28 men aboard was reported crippled and fighting high waves In wind-whip- ped Lake Michigan seven miles off- shore last night. Two coast guard cutters were racing to aid the disabled freighter, which was said to have broken a steam line. The const guard said she was unable to keep slearage way. The Jupiter's position, between Muskcgon and Ludlngton, was In the area known to Orcat Lakes Hcnmcn as the "graveyard of ships." First reports from the Coast Guard did not state whether the freighter, laden with a cargo of rock salt, was making any head- way. Lake Michigan was being whipped by a strong wind that sometimes reached a 60-mile-an-hour velocity. The temperature was 40 degrees and falling. Rain was falling off and on and the beacon light at the lighthouse of the port of Grand Haven had failed through a break In a power line. The Cowl Guard reported the cutter Mackinaw .from Cheboygan and the Sundew from Milwaukee were fighting to get to the side of the Jupiter. The Guard at Muskegon made available a beach cart with line throwing equipment for removal of crewmen from the Jupiter If It were necessary. The Jupiter took cm a cargo of rock salt at Manlstee. Her destination was not learned immediately. Fire Sweeps Garage, Causes Damage Philadelphia -WV Fire last night swept a tire recapping plant and a gnrnge here, causing damage es- 1 AidciMin, W. tlmatcd at 2 Feared Drowned When Boat Upsets Llnesville, Pa. Donald Kin sell, 36-year-old West Middlesex man, drifted to shore In a light boa Friday In a state of near exhaustion and said that' he feared his two companions had drowned In storm tossed Pymatunlng Lake. Klnscll Identified the men as Ken neth Huff, 60, of West Middlesex and John Abor, 45, of Sharpsvllle Fa. He said their boat overturned during a wind squall while the trio was duck hunting. Klnsell said he kept hanging the boat and drifted to an Islam whore he righted the craft. Boy Amputee Presentee Artificial Leg by Vets I'hlluileliihla Billy Tomkln non, who In 10 years old today, go the present he wanted most ycster day. Bill was presented an artlficla left leg by World War II amputees who said they would provide Bill; dally lessoiiK until he Is able t walk without help. Bill lost the lower part of th limb in a traffic accident Sept. New Agency For Foreign Aid Proposed Washington A special House Committee recommended Friday that a new government corporation i sot up to handle all foreign aid The proposed corporation would screen all requests for assistance direct the purchase of food ant other commodities for distribution abroad, and exercise whatever con- trols arc deemed necessary to pro- tect the economy of the Unltei States. The committee, headed by Rep Hcrter also spcclflced that the corporation should make sure "that the aid reaches those for whom It is Intended." Members of the corporation would be appointed by the President, sub- ject 16 confirmation by the Senate The committee recently returned from a European Inspection trip where members studied aid pro blems at first hand. It will repor later on probable costs of emergency during the next few months, as well as the commitments which would be necessitated by a long range aid program. The special committee does no propose legislation In Its own name but Is authorized to present recom mendatlons to standing committee of the House, Herter said all 1 members present at Friday's session approved the recommendations, GOP to Delay Tax Cut Action Until January Bill, When Presented, Will Call for Slashes Retroactive to Jan. 1 Washington The Republican high command sidetracked the tax slashing bill tem- porarily Friday but It will get a high ball signal on the legislative mainline In January. Chairman Knutson (R-Mlnn) of the House Ways and Means Com- mittee, author and ardent advocate of the bill, told reporters after a conference with Speaker Martin "I rather expect the bill will go ovor to January." He emphasized, however, that when he does introduce the bill It will stipulate that the tax slash for Individual taxpayers be effective January 1, same date in the measure he had hoped to press through at the spec- la1 session of Congress beginning Nov. 17. Knutson, who had been plugging or the tax action ahead of foreign lid legislation, called on Martin Allowing these developments: 1. Martin told reporters It was "personal Inclination" to post- pone thn tax hill until the regular session. The speaker said he believed Congress would not have time to ;ake up the tax Issue at the session called by President Truman to deal with foreign aid and Inflation .con- ;rol legislation. Taxes should be ;he first order of business In Jan- uary, he added. 2. HOUSB Republican Lender Hal- leck, of.Indlnnn, backed up Mnitln with a statement saying "there ap- pears to be no slackening in Re- publican determination to bring about tax relief. However; there, appears to be no demand that It come up In thn special session." Committeeman Former Senator Davis Has Restless Day Washington James J. Davis former senator from Pennsylvanli and onetime Secretary of Labor had a "restless day" Friday physician reported. 3. Mr, Truman told his news con- ference that his messiiRc to the ses- sion beginning November 17 would embody no tax recommendations. 4. Representative Doughton   new rain saving program for the joultry industry which has been pprovcd by President Truman. Large Saving Seen "This Is by far the largest saving rom any single part of the current onservation drive thus far d." the Luckman-Anderson ncnt said. Consumers will still be asked to orcgo tho use of eggs on Thursday, ho committee said, but H iimed: "All restrictions on the consump- lon of all types of poultry are >ended while the new program 14 ;lven a chance to show that It can about the substantially jreased grain savings which ilnnned." Pledges Made by Under the newly-negotiated grant, the statement said the ry producers and four major term groups have pledged themaelvMi 1. To reduce the number of chicks by 38h-per cent ow normal 'scasotirt by January 31, 1048. 2. To make a reduction of T pev cent in the production of hicks for all purposes between February 1. 1948, and June 30. 'It Is estimated that these com- bined factors will produce a savine of bushels of statement said. 3. To make a reduction of it r cent In turkey poults as com- pared with 1947 levels. Savings of grain expected from his arc estimated at bushels, 4. To make a IS per cent duction in the production of ducks, as compared with 1947 levels. It ts estimated tills will save jtishcls of grain. 5. To reduce the poultry popiK atlon of the United States through a careful culling of flocks, by chickens by January 1st. This would reduce the total num- r of chickens on American to the statement Mid, and it is estimated it will a> saving of bushels of grain. The statement said the new pro- gram, climaxing three weeks of almost continuous negotiations, to than anything previously proposed and constitutes the largest single Item In the entire grain con- servation campaign" so far. Signed pledges ot support received from of the National Poultry Producers Federation, the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Grange, the National Council of Farmers Cooperatives, and the National Farmers Union, Luckman said. Highway Deaths Decrease in State Harrisburg Motor fiUalltles.on rural highways ed 12.53 per cent in the first 10 months In Pennsylvania when 
                            

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