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Bradford Era Newspaper Archive: October 27, 1944 - Page 1

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   Bradford Era (Newspaper) - October 27, 1944, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                Xhc TVeather Partly cloudy and quite cold. temperatures on Last Page) VOL- 67 NO. 307. (ESTABLISHED 1877) r Oldest Newspaper In toe Rich Bradford Oil Field Published Ever; Morning Except Sunday The Newspapei That's Heal In the Home BPADFORD, PA., FRIDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 27, 1944 (FULL ASSOCIATED FOUR CENTS Losses Mount V. S. Carrier Princeton Lost in Philippine Battle nSlNO THE SEA-AIR ATTACK engagement between American Japanese forces in the waters about the Philippines, the light -fceraft carrier Princeton (above) was lost, bringing: to seven the ganbcr of U. S. carriers lost. Land-based w---1---- and left her badly crippled. Her magazines exploded and she had to be sunk by American ships, The vessel's captain and 1,360 of her officers and men were rescued. Official V. S. Navy photo. (International) Soviets Sweep Down From Carpathian Heights Overrun Two-Thirds Annexed Czech Prov F. R. Forster Dies at Home of Heart Ailment In East Prussia, Northern Norway, Hungary London, Sept. 26.-(AP)-Russian troops, sweeping down out of the Carpathian mountains in an offensive !hich has overrun two-thirds of Ruthenia, today captured _ikacevo, chief communications center of the Hungarian-mnexedCzechoslovalian province, Premier-Marshal Stalin announced tonight in an order of the day. 2 Armies Near Junction Col. Gen. Ivan Petrov's Fourth Ukraine army punched ahead 16 miles in taking Munkacevo (Mun-kacs) and reached a point only 38 miles from a junction with Marshal Rodion Y. Malinovsky's Second Ukraine army units pushing up through northeastern Hungary in an effort to trap large numbers of trie enemy. In East Prussia, northern Norway, and at Szolnok, only 50 miles southeast of Budapest, Hungarian capital, other Russian forces were reported attacking. Reflecting the seriousness with which Berlin views the steady Russian gains, the Germans announced that Col. Gen Heinz Guderian, chief of the general staff, had been entrusted with supreme command on the eastern front A Stockholm dispatch said that the crippled German battleship Tirpitz had been moved from its anchorage at Altenfjord because of the Russian advance and taken temporary refuge near Tromso, nearly 100 miles farther down the journal Oil Executi Had Been in 111 He Three Weeks: Was I Japs So Solly; Make Error; Only 62 V. S. Ships (Not 78) Sunk (By The Associated Press) The Japanese today reduced their claims of American losses in the naval battle of the Philippines, saying they totalled 62 ships.   Yesterday they claimed 78 ships. Ah Imperial Headquarters compilation broadcast by Domei News Agency and picked up by the Federal Communications Commission claimed the sinking of 28 ships, including two carriers, three cruisers, one destroyer, five transports and 17 large landing craft. The report asserted 34 other vessels were set afire, damaged or beached. FDR Carries His Drive to Philadelphia Jap Cl inser U.S. Bombers Leyte Invasion Forces Forge Solid 40-Mile East Coast Front by Overrunninff 15 Towns Mil t_l_ I Jfcmcis Richardson Forster, 69, a resident of this com-liy for the past 47 years, died yesterday afternoon at 4 o'clock at e, 54 Walker avenue. Death I from coronary throm-ods. He had been in 111 health for tie past three weeks. Mr. Forster was born in Renova, Pl m Aug. 7, 1875, the son of Mr. and Mrs. William Lewis Forster. He received his elementary education in Eenova and Westfield, N. Y., and ws graduated  from Cornell Untaraty and the Rochester Busl-i school, Rochester, N. Y. A WH known figure in the oil in-fafry, Mr. Forster was an execute the Journal Oil company of toflcrd at the time of his death. Ifc Forster was a member of the Word club, the Pennhills club, Bradford Lodge, No. 749, P. & He attended the Church of k Ascension of this city. 2k vile, Mrs. Loretta Hanley fcte. preceded him in death in Surviving are one daughter, Dale E Dorn, and one grandad Dale Forster Dorn, both of formerly of San Antonio, �*� Several nieces and nephews "to survive. JtHfcral services will be held Sat-morning at 11:30 o'clock from e, 54 Walker avenue.  The  Hwry S. Sizer, sr., pastor of Church of the Ascension, will Tfte. Interment will be in the Talks at 9 to 9:30 p. Over CBS and Mutual Chicag Speaks orrow Norwegian coast. fit �iut 'sttield, N. Y. cemetery nmani *___ neral arrangements are under ^ Section of the J. a. Still Fun-*u Home. J Me -Bepublicans mil confer Nov. 2-4 m tt* French city of Toulouse, only � niles irom the Spanish frontier, to "decide upon the best methods werthrowing Generalissimo Franca Franco's Falangist regime, Re- Wcaa headquarters here said today. A Paris dispatch disclosed that, to the first time since the out-teak of the clashes along the ftanco-Spamsh frontier a Pax^ **spaper, France Libre, has taken tytho Franco regime. rgess Meredit Dr. W. Temple, Archbishop of Canterbury, Dies London, Oct. 26.-Dr. William Temple, Archbishop of Canterbury and primate of all England, a friend of labor whose- liberal views frequently made him a center of controversy, died today two and a half years after his enthronement. The 63-year-old archbishop, who was Archbishop of York, second highest dignatary in the Church of England, from 1929 until 1942, suf-fered a heart attack in his hotel suite at Westgate-on-the-Sea, near Margate, where he had gone for treatment of gout. Dr. Temple was enthroned as 98th Archbishop of Canterbury Apr. 23, 1942, succeeding Dr. Cosmo Gordon Lang, theri 78, who retired to make way for a younger man. The son of a former Archbishop of Canterbury-the only son of an Archbishop of Canterbury ever to hold the position himself-Dr. Temple was among England's most popular churchmen. By WILLIAM T. PEACOCK Associated Press Staff Writer President Roosevelt swings today into intensive home stretch campaigning expected to keep him on the road much of the time from now until the voters choose between him and Gov. Thomas E. Dewey 10 days hence. Tonight he speaks in Shibe Baseball Park, Philadelphia, the address will be heard from 9 to 9:30 p. mM Eastern War Time, over CBS and Mutual. From Philadelphia, the President will travel a road Dewey already has paced to Chicago and address a rally at Soldier Field tomorrow (By the Associated Press) General MacArthur's Headquarters, Philippines, Friday, Oct. 27.-(IP) -Fighter-covered Liberator bombers expanded Japan's greatest naval disaster by damaging a light cruiser In the Mindanao sea as invasion forces on Leyte forged a solid 40-mile east coast front, overrunning 11 more towns, headquarters announced today. Hit in giUfcuJ*!*, The cruiser W'fcK through which? whipped enemy 'VttMMp after being tufriecT *DatftT srio penetrating to   the   Leyte   shore beachheads. The Mindanao sea was traversed by the southern half of a naval squeeze the Japanese unsuccessfully strove to clamp on Leyte. The sea leads into Surigao strait. The 40-mile juncture was achieved by the 10th and 24th Army corps. Towns taken included bypassed Buri, whose airfield was seized earlier, and the inland highway junction of Tabontabon, both in the southern sector. The junction was established on the eastern coast of Leyte, south of Tanoan. 40 Miles Under Control "We now control the eastern coastal sector of Leyte from the northern end of San Juanico strait to Dulag, a distance of 40 miles," said MacArthur. Elements of the First Cavalry division, which seized the southern shores of Samar island, across the strait, repulsed   a   small   enemy Undated Naval Boxscore (By the Associated Press) Japanese naval losses in the three sea-air actions in Philippine waters, as compiled from American communiques and a first-hand account of one of the fights, are as follows: Probably Sunk    Sunk  Damaged  Total Carriers ........   2 1 0 3 Battleships .....   2 2 6        10 Cruisers ........   5 0 4 9 Destroyers......   3 0 lx        4 Total   ......12 3        11        26 x-Several destroyers damaged in one of the actions cannot be included in the total since the exact number was not specified in the communique. Complete Total Expected To Exceed Jap Disaster Off Guadalcanal in 1942 Incomplete Returns List 2 Jap Carriers Cruisers British Troops By-Pass Stronghold of Tilburg Threaten to. Encircle City on Left Flank of Blazing 15-Mile Battlefront; Fresh Landings On South Beveland Islands by Canadians L r London, Nov. 26.-(AP)-British troops in a lightning stab through wobbling German defenses by-passed the enemy stronghold of Tilburg in southern Holland today, threatening to encirclt the city on the left flank of a blazing 15-mile battlefront, while the German radio reported landings by Canadian forces on South Beveland tin the Schelde estuary northwest of Antwerp. '$fclng   across   the   Tilburg-'S Hertogenbosch highway and railroad, armored vanguards of Lt. Gen. j Sir Miles C. Dempsey's Second Brit- Destroyers Sunk; Carrier, Two Battleships Probably Sunk; 12 Others Damaged U. S. Pacific Fleet Headquarters, Pearl Harbor, Oct. 26 (AP) sunk Attacks Made In Pacific Area Japs Believed night. His campaign  plans  after that j counterattack at Lapaz. have not been disclosed but he is expected to visit Boston, possibly Cleveland, and is down for an election eve speech   at Poughkeepsle, n. y. As the President made ready for his trip, he was praised in a statement by Secretary of State Hull as a "statesman equipped   by nature (Continued on Page Four) s Bu To Plav M^Koad, Oct. -5 Ssrsess lieredith, Just i-P)-Capt. just placed on an status Mi the war teft, -till plav the io.e tote, "GX Joe." Uae&th eaten " u � private* Army 240,000 Planes, 70,000 Tanks Produced in U.S. Washington, Oct. 26.-(ff)-American factories have turned out 240,-000 airplanes and 70,000 tanks since the beginning of the war production program, WPB Chairman J. A. Krug announced at a news conference today. He said the plane production included 25,000 four-engine bombers. He disclosed that production of the Boeing Superfortress (B-29) still is lagging, but said that recent changes have improved production and that manufacturers now are optimistic of meeting future schedules. Police Chief Warn School Patrol Boy Must Be Obeyed Bradford police have received several complaints this week of motorists disobeying stop orders of the Safety School Patrol lads. The complaints state that the motorists have driven through the flag" lines formed by the patrol boys to allow school children the right of way to cross streets safely. Chief Edward Edmonds stated last night that he has been given several license numbers of motorists who raced through the "flag lines" endangering the lives of not only the patrol boys but also the youngsters crossing the streets. This practice must stop, the police chief stated. Persons listed as violators will be issued summons and brought into police court for a hearing. it 4,000 NURSES NEEDED Washington, Oct. 26 (&) - The Navy reported tonight that 4,000 nurses are needed "urgentl^* by^ June 30, 1945, to keep pace with the still expanding Navy. Platform Appearance By FDR at Clarksburg Charleston, W. Va., Oct. 26-(JPh-President Roosevelt will make a brief platform appearance at Clarksburg shortly after noon Sunday on his way from Chicago to Washington, Democratic National Committeeman Arthur B. Koontz announced tonight In the central section of the battlefront, west of Palo, the 24th division is meeting increasing opposition. Farther south, in the 24th corps area sector, the 96th division xap-tured -Tabontabon. That inland highway junction town is three and a half miles west of the Catmon hills, which were enveloped earlier. Buri Captured After sharp fighting the 7th division captured Buri, on the Burauen-Dagami road. Buri had been bypassed earlier, as the doughboys swept northward from captured Burauen, because of stiff Japanese opposition there. Enemy air activity against Allied shipping in San Pedro bay and the beachhead areas of easternrLeyte again was limited to intermittent harassing raids. These caused light casualties and damage, the communique said. Antiaircraft fire shot down 39 enemy planes, fighter patrols downed 14 more and carrier aircraft from flattops in Leyte gulf got 23. Jap Ships Attacked Remnants of the Japanese naval force defeated in Leyte gulf by Vice Adm. Thomas C. Kinkaid's Seventh fleet were kept under continual attack by Allied aircraft. Thirteen additional communities were freed from the enemy. The northern coast of Leyte was secured by amphibious forces which vaulted around 20 miles of shoreline in a surprise move that virtually blocked the Japanese retreat northward from Tacloban. This operation, reported by MacArthur's Thursday communique, was matched by inland advances in the southern sector, where the capture of Burauen apparently boxed the Japanese in the broad Leyte valley. Kinkaid's Seventh fleet had smashed the first and possibly last major attempt by the Japanese navy to turn the tide of American reconquest. ish army reached the town o* Uden-hout, four miles north of Tilburg, as other British units slashed into the eastern outskirts of the strongly-fortified town. Vught, a mile south of 'S Hertogenbosch, fell at mid-day after a savage fight between British infantry and German parachute troops. Three-fourths of 'S Hertogenbosch was in Allied hands at nightfall of the third day of house-to-house fighting. Field Marshal Walter von Model's army was reported in a critical plight and its attempt to escape northward across the Maas Rhine was gravely jeopardized. The Nazis already had puUed their administrative personnel out of both Tilburg and Breda, 12 miles to the west, and a British staff officer declared that the Tilburg garrison would have to move quickly to avoid entrapment. Breda was the last strongpolnt that might shield a general enemy withdrawal across the Maas and Waal Rhine rivers into central Holland. The German high command. In reporting a new Canadian landing on South Beveland island on the north side of the Schelde estuary, said "counter-measures" were in progress. Thp Germans, fiehtine with the To Ha (Continued on Page Four) $94,698.07 Raised For War Chest; $6,801.93 Needed T. L. McDowell and Hugh A. Grant, chairman and vice chairman of the Community-War Chest campaign, announced last night that an additional $900.60 has been received making the total amount, $94,698.07 with a balance of $6,801.93 still to be raised. The campaign is continuing and all divisions are asked to continue their efforts to complete the cards which they have in their possession, seeing that they are immediately returned to Campaign Headquarters, 150 Main street, as quickly as possible. The campaign is not officially closed and will not be closed until the goal has been reached. vel75 Warships Left Imperial Navy Remains Factor Despite Loss Of 26 Capital Vessels Washington Oct. 26. (fP)-The Japanese Navy certainly is limping after its disastrous defeat in Philippine waters, but it still remains a factor in future operations near Japan. Despite the heavy damage shown in initial reports from the battle, conservative estimates tonight show that probably as many as 175 Japanese warships remain in fighting condition. This is based upon report* that Nipponese naval strength before the Japanese fleet dared to move into the Philippines included some 200 ships of all types exclusive of submarines and a number of merchant vessels converted for use as aircraft carriers. In the mighty battle fought over the Philippines area-from which reports still are fragmentary - at least 26 Japanese ships were put out of action, either sunk or damaged. Subtracting the reported sinkings, or probable sinkings, of four battleships, three aircraft carriers and five cruisers from best available estimates of Japanese strength a week ago, the enemy probably has this fleet left: Battleships-Six to eight. Carriers-Seven to nine. Cruisers-25 to 30. Destroyers and destroyer escorts- 120 to 140. These figures do not include the Japanese submarine fleet which totaled 78 craft at the beginning of the war and undetermined numbers constructed since then which may offset losses totaling 18. doomed to idleness in repair yards in the three fleet battles off the Philippines which saved Gen. Douglas MacArthur's invasion armies. Tonight there was every indication that when the complete total is known it will exceed Nippon's previous greatest naval disaster off Guadalcanal in November, 1942, when 35 ships were sunk or damaged. Minimum at 27 Communiques of MacArthur and! nrr* j 1 A  Adm. Chester W. Nimitz, plus a I VU 1nPfiTtt*P2ln All* field dispatch from Rear Adm. Dan-1 " -IAIv^LH VCtU iUl iel Barbey, placed the minimum enemy losses at 27. These admittedly incomplete returns listed 12 warships sunk (two carriers, two battleships, five cruisers, and three destroyers); three probably sunk (a carrier and two battleships); and 12 damaged (six battleships, five cruisers and one destroyer). But the figure soared beyond 30 on the strength of a generalised recapitulation of result battles near the Leyte Invasloii 'scene-tte third was fought south of Formosa-given war correspondent today by Vice Adm. Thomas C. Kinkaid of the Seventh fleet. Kinkaid's generalization made It impossible, however, to   give   the exact total. 19 in Two Battles For the two battles fought off the Philippines, communiques of Mac-Arthur and Nimitz listed the knockout of 19 enemy warships. Kinkaid at Leyte told Dean Sched-ler, Associated Press war correspondent, that the Japanese sent 14 U. S. Planes in Raids On Kuriles, Mariana; Marshalls and Yap ,7^ � V. 3. Pacific Fleet Headquarters, Pearl Harbor, *Oct. 2ft-OT-American air raids against the Kuriles, to the north of Japan, Yap in, the Western Carolines, Japanese holdings in the northern Marianas and in the bypassed Marshalls were reported today in a communique. Army Air Force Mitchells and Liberators and Navy Liberators and Venturas attacked Paramushiro, Matsuwa, Shumushu and Onnekotan Islands in the Kuriles Monday and Tuesday. A 6,000-ton cargo ship was set afire south of Paramushiro. .    ,_        .. ,     ___c,,.*,Qrtf   Marine Corsairs and Army Libera- to 16 warships   through   Surigao, ^ ^ sfcrafed       gatur- straits into one battle and only six Victory Shortens War Declares Kinkaid Leyte, Philadelphia, Friday, Oct. 27-(JP)-Vice Adm. Thomas C. Kinkaid, whose American Seventh Fleet routed a section of the Japanese Imperial Navy, today termed the action "a complete naval victory of great importance." "It brought us that much closer to the end of the war," he told newsmen. Ickes Invites Proposals From Oil Industry On Anglo, U. S. Pact Washington, Oct. 26-(iP)-Petroleum Administrator Ickes today asked the industry to provide specific suggestions on how the proposed Anglo-American World oil agreement can be improved. Asserting there had been concerted criticisms raised by the industry" of the agreement, which must be ratified by the Senate, Ickes invited the Petroleum Industry War Council to present definite proposals. The council, representing the oil and gasoline companies, works directly with the govqtyiment in meeting wartime petroleum needs. -a cruiser and five destroyers- "were left to flee westward." The admiral said between 25 and 30 enemy vessels were sent down for battle off Samar island and "only 14 of these ships were able to retire." Kinkaid's recapitulation would mean minimum Japanese losses of 19 and maximum losses to 26-with an unspecified number of the fleeing ships damaged and subject to continuing air attacks. All figures were tentativft, not taking into account "several destroyers known to have been sunk but not totalled. Cruiser Damaged MacArthur added the official communique total by reporting today a light cruiser was damaged by fighter-escorted Liberators in the Mindanao sea, the direction which would be taken by the Japanese fleet which had moved to battle through Surigao straits. Both enemy battleships went down off the Philippines. MacArthur reported the sinking of one. John Leonard, Reuters naval correspondent aboard Rear Adm. Barbey's flagship in Leyte gulf reported the other. Nimitz, in a traditional "Well done" message to the fleet, expressed his pride and gratitude for "the courageous and aggressive manner in which they have done their utmost to destroy the enemy in recent fighting in the Pacific." 2 U. S. Carriers Lost Aithoneh the American command- day, Sunday and Monday. A Corsair was lost to intense anti-aircraft fire Monday. Liberators dropped 58 tons of bombs on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands Tuesday. Th^ee enemy fighters intercepted but caused no damage to the raiders. Corsairs destroyed truck and barges in the northern Palau Is-lands. Dauntless dive bombers and Corsair fighters attacked Jaluit in the Marshalls Sunday with 36 tons of explosives. 0PA Volunteer Workers on Gas Rationing Praised The local OPA announced last night that 5,623 applications for "A" gasoline rations had been received and processed during the special filing period which ended Wednesday evening. Applications which are now being filed will not be completed until after November 15. The processing of the applications, completed within the short time, was made possible only by the volunteer services of the following people, the OPA said: Mrs. Courtney McDowell, Mrs. Richard Brown, Miss Joan Wilson, Mrs. Ann Scroxton, Miss Connie Moran, Miss Rose Ann Maitland, Mrs. Helen Thompson, Mrs. Elizabeth Merry, Miss Helen _______-        . Beth Orange, Miss Julia Ann John- carriers and damage   to   several  P)-Federal Judge Nelson McVicar today refused to dismiss a suit filed in behalf of 1,400 shipbuilding employes of the Blaw-Knox Co., seeking an accounting of $80,000 in union dues and assessments allegedly paid to an AFL-Plumbers and Steamfitters union. (Continued on Page Fourteen) ROBERT PATTERSON, 95 Sharon, Pa., Oct. 26.-(ff)-One of Mercer county's oldest residents, Robert Patterson, 95, dieaV yesterday at his home in Fairview townshio. �i * -   

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