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Bradford Era: Monday, October 23, 1944 - Page 1

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   Bradford Era (Newspaper) - October 23, 1944, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                The Weather Sunny and wanner. (Temperatures on Last Page) 1 Oldest Newspaper In the Rica Bradford Oil Field Published Ever? Morning Except Sunday The Newspaper That's Head In the Home VOL. 67 NO. 303. (ESTABLISHED 1877) BRADFORD (FULL ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICES) PRICE FOUR CENTS A mericans British Second Army Opens Surprise Offensive in Hand U. S. Security Group Envoy Must Have Power To Act, Declares FDR Presdent Retires Behind Curtain of Censorship After Tour of New York and Address of Foreign Policy in Which He Asserts U. S. Will Aid Peace; To Talk in Philadelphia New York, Oct. 22.-(AP)-Committed to unprecedented powers for America's spokesman on a world peace council, President Roosevelt doffed his campaign gear today and retired once more behind a curtain of censorship which conceals his wartime movements. Speaks Again Friday lie curtain, will be pulled aside ggun next Friday night, however, to his fourth big political speech 4 tte fourth term drive in Philadelphia's Shibe park. The Chief Ex-KWive W be "on the record" much of fee time from then until fiction Day. Be has a speaking date in Bos-tan, probably Nov. 4, and Chicago ib& Cleveland have been mentioned is likely spots for more oratorical efforts to sway votes. Furthermore, tte fecial train which brought Mr. Brandt to New York for a rourai [ of political activities yesterday had i wrty rigged out press car. Reputes figured it wasn't fixed up jfet for trips to New York, Phila-tfpbb and Boston, W Ibr a major pronouncement on Jorip affairs, delivered here last a*** fte Waldorf Astoria hotel, tte ChW' Executive selected as a � - J** m lam a dinner of the Foreign Mcy Association; Two thousand Pfims, stacked up in balconies and 97 Are Dead, 107 Missing in Cleveland Fire Canadian Units Take Bresk ens 172 Injured Treated; Fires Still Burn Over 50-Block Area as Result of Gas Blasts AIR VIEW OF LEYTE-first major Invasion target when the greatest ocean-going invasion armada opened its reinvasion of the Philippines, the huge landing forces quickly seized control of strategic leyte Island, in the central Philippines. Here is a II. S. Navy aerial photo of a section of Leyte where thousands of the American invasion army took over. (International Soundphoto) In Pincer Move British Within 4 Miles Of 6S-Hertogenboscl Southwestern Holland; Patton Cains 2 Miles (By the Associated Press) British Second army troops mounted a surprise offensive and plunged to within four miles of 'S-Hertogenbosch, German stronghold in southwestern Holland, yesterday while Canadian forces seized Breskens in the Schelde estuary and Esschen in a high-powered push north of Antwerp. Patton's Army Strikes In Prance, Lt. Gen. George S. Patton's Third army struck against flood-hampered German defenses east of Nancy and advanced two Red Cross Sends Penicillin for Use Of Yank Prisoners Washington, Oct 22.-(JF>-The American Red Cross sent 5,000 tubes of pencillin by air express to the International Red Cross at Geneva to be used for American prisoners of war held by Germany, it was announced today. 1,100 Heavy Bombers Hit Reich Factories 1 Lose Lives Cleveland,   Oct.  22 -{JPh~Weary searchers probed charred ruins of a\ 50-block east side area today for, bodies of the dead, while living refugees liruoged slowly back: to what was left of homes shattered by thunderous blasts and raging flames of . _   , . .._ ,        , a liquid fuel gas storage plant ex- ttfctng into foyers, vigorously ap- plosl0IL ptojed the4 President's stand on    CasuaIties Irom ^ disaster, which !L2Lf^^fT*^    P stT* at the East Ohio Gas com-i^r^ftT**     � I*"? Plant at mid-afternoon Frf- missing. t.       ...      - - , .  _ ,   Many of those listed by a Missing S^fj^ff ^ y **T>T Bureau at county morgue, � top we peace by force, if neces- In Erie Fire 1 The Council of the United Na-T te," lie said, "must have the �rj. x z x It is clear that, if the wild tip&ization is to have any nitty at all, our representative nut be endowed in advance by the peojfe themselves, by constitutional aeos through their representatives in Oocgtess, with authority to act." Mr. Boosewlt took a soaking, 50, nfltt of it, on a four-hour drive1 *hfc& paxaded him in a rain-swept   w8 dominated by the heavy hand rt tw.i_i.i__       . J however, may be found among the .unidentified dead. Coroner S. R. Gerber, directing the search at the scene of Cleveland's worst catastrophe and one of the nation's major disasters, said "It may be days" before the rubble gives up all its dead. Seven victims remained in critical condition in hospitals, and 165 others were being treated for less serious injuries. Two dozen small fires still flared and died away intermittently 48 hours after the first of a series of blasts, which set a holocaust raging. Muffled explosions continued to reverberate from pools of gas trapped In underground mains. County engineering crews manned bulldozers to raze gaunt, fire-blackened walls of gutted buildings, and to pull down naked chimneys. Nearly 10,000 persons who resided on the fringe of the flame-ravaged neighborhood, worked their way fearfully back to homes damaged by concussion. Fifth Victim Shore Cottage Not Expected to Live The Road to Berlin (By the Associated Press) 1. Western front: 301 miles (from *&M-&y&...&�1$�*r 2. Russia**: (frwn W? 3. Italian (from south R. W. Manning I_J)ead at 85 The Red Cross, manning refugee �tolattonismShould Republicans I centers' Usted 680 men women and control of Congress Nov. 7 he cnUdren wno nave no nomes to SM"*"J '  '      which to return. Inside the half-mile square section which felt the greatest havoc, *r   isolationists ^ -inveterate^ So Secret C*"^ t w struck ^^^ductof taqti criticism of c try to^ aUairs. He savd.V* secret, unconstitutional taoafc in that field. stf �= tSAjassertionsJoreign Sfit-ar, perhaps I *w BWtotion's attitude tflW"   ^at �E5, Mr. Roosevelt prorrusea v "lis G�man (Continued on Page Three) Lardner Killed, Russell Hill Hurt In Aachen Area Erie, Pa., Oct. 22-(jP)-Three wo-men and a man were burned to death today whe'n explosions followed by fire destroyed the six-room frame cottage of James Cole, six! miles from here on the shore of Lake Erie. The victims were: Mrs. Mary Cole, 40, wife of the owner of the cottage. Patricia Bierck, 18, daughter of Mrs. Cole by a former marriage. Clifford Ayers, 38, of Erie, chief accountant for the Perm Brass & Copper company. His' wife, Mrs. Loretta Ayers, also 38. Cole himself was the fifth occupant of the cottage. He is in a serious condtion in Hamot hospital here and attendants said little hope is held for his recovery. Cole is purchasing agent for the Perm Brass & Copper company. The group was weekending at Cole's home, the Ayers helping with the canning of some chickens. Just before they retired last night, Cole filled and lighted three oil stoves. Cole said he was awakened early today by an explosion. He and his wife ran downstairs to find the lower part of the house afire. "We rushed outside to get water," said Cole. "Then my wife remembered the others and ran back in to warn them. She was hardly inside the house when there was a second and louder explosion. I tried to get back in but the door was jammed. I broke the door down and entered. It was too late to do anything." When he re-entered the house, Cole suffered burns about the face and body. He was able to get into his car and drive two miles to the home of a neighbor. Coroner Warren W. Wood was collaborating with State Police in seeking the cause of the fire. He said the blasts might have come from the oil stoves or from gas lines to a well on the Cole property. Paper Drive s Washed Out Plans Made for Extra Heavy Pickup Next Saturday Morning District Governor Of Rotary Here By DON WHITEHEAD With the U. S. First Army Near Aachen, Oct. 19.-(Delayed)-(^P)- David Lardner, correspondent for the New Yorker magazine, was in-- ^man T� , , Jured fatally and Russell Hill, cor- 10 * Slaved �P   m n0t going i "spondent for the New York Herald Be suggested th i Tribune, was injured today when, _ ^ e�n their w ev5ltua.lly feey j their jeep was blown up by road! Dr  for cluD assembly.   Con- A heavy rain and wind storm eliminated the city's second waste paper pickup Saturday as a fleet of trucks and nearly 50 Boy Scouts waited for the rain to stop so that they could gather in thousands of pounds of waste paper put on porches throughout the city and suburban areas. After nearly two hours that they could start out, orders were issued to postpone the collection until next Saturday, Oct .28. Collections could have been made but War Production Board salvage officials said that wet paper is useless. With this knowledge, salvage authorities did not think it advisable to take the chance of spoiling the thousands of pounds of paper that had been saved by Bradford housewives and business firms. "Next Saturday, weather permitting, we'll strive to get it all in," Leo F. Conley, waste paper chairman of the McKean County Salvage Council, said. "If the weather had not been so bad, we would have made the collection but it would have been unfair to those who had saved their paper and to the war effort to even attempt last Saturday's collection. Wet paper is absolutely of no value to the war effort." This Saturday's collection should be one of the largest one-day collections ever recorded in McKean county. With two weeks* waste paper on hand plus the extra week, more than 35 tons of paper should \ be picked up on Saturday, he added. The same collection schedules will be maintained with the Legion 'Smokes' Fund, sponsors of the pickup and to whom proceeds are given for the 'Smokes' fund, maintaining an all day office schedule for information. Any persons whose waste paper is not picked up by 1 o'clock Saturday should call 8201. t Here for 55 Years Served 38 Years As St. Bernard's Sexton 2 of (Accompanying Fighters Missing But All Bombers Return; No Opposition on Trip London, Oct. 22-A fleet of more than 1,100 American heavy bombers, attacking without loss, bombed northern Germany's rich industrial belt from Hamm and Muns-miles. Enemy positions had been1 ter east to Hannover and Bruns-inundated by bursting of a dam j ^ today> Two of the 750 cover. near Dieuze  Thursday by U. S. [ ^ fighter planes m not retunif Work Started On Great Base, Says M'Arthur Japanese Withdrawing Westward After Initial Defeat; Their Supply Problem Said Difficult Roger W. Manning, 85, a resident of this city for 55 years and for. 38 years sexton of St. Bernard's church died Sunday morning at 2 o'clock at the Fairview hospital. Thunderbolts. Germany's eastern front also thundered with activity as the Russians cut the Gumbinnen-Goldap highway in East Prussia, where they had penetrated 21 miles, according to Berlin 'reports. Moscow still was silent on the East Prussian developments as other Red armies reached the Niemen river opposite the rail center of Tilsit. Both Gumbinnen and Goldap were under assault and Russian artillery was blasting Tilsit. The Berlin radio acknowledged a Nazi withdrawal in one sector. Nyiregyhaza Captured and they were believed to have landed in friendly territory. All of the bombing was done by instruments through overcast clouds. No enemy aircraft were encountered and ant 1-aircraft fire was generally moderate. RAF Lancasters escorted by fighU ers madr a hVavy attevfc this?**!**- noon on the German inland port and railway center of Neuss, Just across the Rhine west of Dusseldorf, and 20 miles northwest of Cologne. No planes were lost. The RAF's famed Brazilian Typ-noon squadron, named in honor of Brazil, that had been credited with mortally wounding Nazi Field Mar- Premier-Marshal   Stalin   announced the capture of strategically j        "^"e^" s. . Rommel last important Nyiregyhaza in eastern j July ^ attacked a "heavily defend-In good health until the past few j Hungary by Russians pushing nearer ; ed heacjquarters area" in the Bresk- months, his condition was not considered serious until Just a few days ago. Death was caused by complications. He was born in Roscrea, County Tipperary, Ireland on Dec. 22, 1859, and came to this country with his parents at the age of 12 years. The family settled in Neenah, Wis., where he attended school and later learned the paper making trade at the Kinberly and Clark Paper Mills. He was employed by that firm until he came here 55 years ago to succeed his uncle, another Roger Manning, as sexton of St. Bernard's church and cemetery. He retired in 1930. Since the death of his wife 15 years ago, Mr. Manning has resided with his niece, Mrs. Charles Palmer of 69 Rochester street. Known to his friends as "Rody" he resided for many years on Pearl street. He was a member of St. Bernard's church and the L.C.B.A. Survivors, in addition to his niece, are several other nephews and nieces. He was the last surviving member of a family of two sisters and six brothers. The body was removed to the J. A. Still Funeral Home where funeral services will be held Tuesday morning at 8:15 o'clock. A Requiem MarifWl be said at St. Bernard's chnreh'it'9 o'clock. Burial will be ln: itfff*iiuTj> plot in St. Bernard's cemetery. a junction with other units advancing southward through Czechoslovakia. A Russian communique also announced that the Red army in Finland had reached the Norwegian frontier. Meanwhile, the American, British Germans in the west were backed by 1,100 TJ. S. heavy bombers which ba t ter ed German Indus trial cities including Hamm, Munster, Hannover and Brunswick. Allied Hold Strengthened Canadian capture of Esschen, 16 miles above Antwerp, strengthened dustria} cUles thafc are north and the Allied hold in that area. The two-pronged British drive from near Nijmegen toward 'S-Hertogenbosch combined with the Canadian push to tighten a giant vise on the remaining German positions in lower Holland. A British Royal Navy communique announced new landings on the important island of Lernnos, which guards the entrance to the Dardanelles. In Italy, New Zealand tankmen rumbled seven miles into the Po valley north of Cesena. 232   ?as Rations issued; 7,708 Delinquents 2 Slide Down 30-Foot Rubber Hose, Escape Jail (By the Associated Press) American forces steadily gained on all fronts on Leyte Island, in the central Philippines, and work commenced on a "great base for all arms for future operations," a communique from General Douglas MacArthur's headquarters said today. Japs Withdrawing The Japanese apparently are withdrawing westward after their "preliminary defeat," the communique said. Their supply problem already has become difficult and if they are forced into the hills it might become "acute.* Preparations already have begun to groom the captured Tacloban and Dulag airfields for American use, paralleling other work to groom the island as a great base. Simultaneously, MacArthur In a proclamation to the Philippine people said the Americans had come as "liberators for the entire Philippine archipelago. Government Reestablished He said the seat of the islands' government had been reestablished under President Sergio Osmena of the CommonwealtbuSB' landed witdHi' "republic" government are "null and void" in areas "free of enemy occupation and. control.'* While Allied bombers bombed flank Philippine islands and other Southwest Pacific targets, the Japanese attempted "minor and ineffective" air raids on American shipping off Leyte, the communique reported. 3 Freighters Sunk Allied planes sank three small freighters and probably sank four more in strikes at the Visayan islands in the central Philippines. Heavy bombers unloaded 94 tons of bombs on Mindanao, hitting among other targets the key northern communications center of Cagayan, where there was no opposition. Other widespread raids included night reconnaissance attacks on the bomb-hit oil center of Balikpapan, Borneo, where fires were re-started. The American forces were penetrating a vital valley area Sunday toward the roadside town � of San Pablo, seven miles inland from their Dulag beachhead. Advance About 4 Miles In all sectors of the 18 mile front along the east coast of the island facing Leyte gulf the Yanks have advanced to an average depth of four miles. They now hold Tacloban, the provincial capital, its airdrome and the towns and its airfield on the south. Apparently the bewildered Japanese had not recovered from the surprise they got when the American convoy of some 600 ships entered the gulf under heavy naval and air bombardments to land Gen. Douglas MacArthur's army and its great *�������        *   m       .      , .     , weight of supplies and equipment. 5,0000,000 pounds from August to a! _ _ ,  , , * * 1 * orfon^ T        .        .u,f I The general ,in personal command total of -89,236,000 pounds, constitut- � ens pocket, where Canadian troops are driving to clear the Schelde Estuary. Mosquitos swept over Germany and Holland during the night, patrolling roads and railways leading to the battlefront, and crossings be- and Canadian drives against the I tween ^ and Meppel and in the Munster area were bombed and strafed. Weather which had kept Eighth j Air Force Liberators and Fortresses at home for two days was still soupy enough over Europe to delay today's attacks on the four railway and in- east of Cologne. Lend-Lease Food Deliveries Show Slight Decrease Washington, Oct. 22-(JFh-Lend-Lease food deliveries by the United States totaled 451,872,551 pounds during September, slightly under the 558,577,000 pounds shipped in August, the war food administration reported'today. Deliveries of meat products down ed hte biggest item, but dairy and poultry products, second in the list reached 151,050,000 pounds, exceeding the August deliveries by nearly 50,000,000 pounds. Dairy and poultry made up 28 per cent of Septem- 4 Escaped Convicts Are Still at Large Bethlehem, Pa.,   Oct.   22.-(JFh- he decrpprf � 1 they ran lnto a mined area' ^" % aiw?      171 punish- 1   Lardner had joined the First army, with ^ Barnes. Risible fm. +^ennans ',directly; Press corps only a few days ago on m. waay iui ^ T� i Jnlajmed Pour convicts who escaped from the ference and discussion is planned | * orthampton cQunty jail ftt Easton this agony of man- j his first war assignment. Hill is a veteran correspondent or the western desert campaign an? of North Africa. * hS*' N- Y- Oct. 22. A brother, James P. Lardner, was Tlie weekly luncheon will be at 12 o'clock noon today. week fromtonight the local Rotary club will hold a Hallowe'en party and ladies' night. ___ * �* ^tvSy?diCated throu^~ i civil war while fighting for _  tiieil t�    I01 more        30! Loyalists as a volunteer in the In-     , ,,------------ i viczko all of �^inT l3�t ^ ^tional Brigade, members of the today by ^^rfJ0",^C.^ ,**� long lUnea. She was 56. u^^er family said. Moscow with Marshal Stalin.    J w � *. wnose pen and ink: killed in 1938 during the Spanish CHURCHILL IN LONDON Thursday remained at large today while state police scoured the section around Hellertown, near here, after a car believed to have been used by the quartet was found abandoned in that area. The convicts who made their escape are Lawrence "Slim" Kauff- Every application for "A" gasoline rations, 2,292 of them, received by the OPA to date, had been processed last night, it was announced by Gordon Thompson, in charge of issuance. Approximately 7,708 applications remain to be received by the local board.   To insure issuance before Nov. 9, they must be filed with the local board by Wednesday. Those received after that date will follow the   regular   channels and none will be completed until after Nov. 15, it was said. Pittsburgh, Oct. 22.-OP)-Sliding down from the roof on a 30-foot length of rubber hose, two prisoners ; ** ~ escaped from Allegheny county jail j ' .1?mf ; ^ ,t ^ , . , ^ in Pittsburgh's "Golden Triangle"1   �f the        deUvered last minth' _    L   ,,   j    ^    , , WPA said, 68 per cent was for the | today Deputy Warden Grant Pnce,^^ ^dom and other British -  reported^ i possessions:  35 per cent for Russia, The break evidently  naa  oeen remaining seven wr cent planned for Sunday to avoid detec- Greece tion by office workers in Diamond   ... ' _T      , n,ln,j J l Africa,   the   Netherlands,   Poland, street buildings. Yugoslavia and the French commit- The men, still at large tonight, , , .K       , w i �       i.  * t�  i -j   01 �� tee of National Liberation, are Melvm Roberts Loveland, 21,; _ last of the operation, paid high tribute to the tactical skill of his local commanders who, by enveloping and infiltrating strong Japanese defenses held casualties to a minimum. V. S. Tanks in Action On the southern front, where the Japanese offered serious initial resistance with mortal- and artillery fire, the Nipponese made two strong countersmashes led by tanks but were repulsed, and the victorious Yanks pressed along the southwest-West  Africa,  North em flank Qf wWe Leyte d Girl, 17, Ends Life alleged Army deserter who Thursday was given 5 to 10 years on 39 burglary charges; and Nick Derembeis, 32, arrested last August and awaiting trial on a charge of stealing auto tires. California Governor Reacts to Penicillin Sacramento, Calif., Oct. 22.-(/P)- Dr. J. B. Harris said today he believed Gov. Earl Warren, ill in a hospital with influenza and a kid- Boy, 14, Accidentally Killed While Taking Brother's Rifle Apart Easton, Pa., Oct. 22-Melvin C. Renner, 14, of suburban Wilson, I was accidentally killed today when a bullet in a rifle which he was taking apart, discharged, striking him in the head. Chief of Police Lester Young of Wilson, said the youth took a rifle, owned by his brother now in the Clarion, Pa., Oct. 22.-W-Louise j ney infection, was on the road to � Army,  from his home and went Cotherman, 17-year-old high school: recovery. senior,  shot herself  through  the;   Pencillin treatments were ordered heart last night, Deputy Coroner H. ethlehem and Ed- | M. Wellman reported, after attend- | ing a movie with a boy friend. for Warren yesterday and his reaction to them ha# been excellent, Harris said. territory for tank warfare. The Americans apparently were headed for Burauen Town, three miles beyond San Pablo, where the provincial road swings up the valley toward Leyte's north coast. With Tacloban in their hands, the Americans now command a waterway leading to the Samar sea and the Islands of Cebu, Negros, Panay and Palawan, in the very heart of the Philippine archipelago. The occupied  airfields, like  all Japanese dromes, will require much i work before they can be used to full advantage. Planes Support Drive Carrier-based planes continued to support the invasion. They blasted central Philippines points reaching from Samar ^nunediately north of shooting with three other boys. Renner was disassembling the gun after shooting at targets when it |Leyte, to Palawan, on the extreice discharged.   He died a short time j -:-     f � later in Easton hospital. i      (Continv-d on Page Three)' H--   

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