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   Bradford Era (Newspaper) - August 8, 1944, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                UK- (ESTABLISHED 1877) Oldest Newspaper la the Rich Bradford Oil Field Published Every Morning Except Sunday The Newspaper That's Read In the Home BRADFORD, PA., TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 8, 1944. (FULL ASSOCIATED FOUR CENTS of spital M Cases in City; titulion Set If me Strikes y^'s Building Will Be Converted Into tjon Unit Fully Equipped to Administer to Methods of Treatment If Necessary tismA intended to provide the best possible keni any polio cases are reported in Bradford yv area, officials of the Bradford hospital bounced that "full resources" of that mstitu \t town behind the. movement to adequately bj infantile paralysis cases which may develon i or immediate vicinity. * & superintendent of ,fctod, "It is often & attending physician diagnose of this �e aid of the hos-,7. Also, the latest sasnt are difficult : tie average home, atfcre, has provided idsns to take .pal fluid for labor-DKied cases. These r3 be carried out ? any of the patients for Transfer i�s reveals that a b, ften the hospital nnsf er those patients Skiren's department secical and surgical hospital and to use =n's building as an idiord hospital has on to admit corneals, the officials are voluntarily the doors of this sincere effort to immunity  health German Troops PuU Out of South France (Catted Ryan, as president Health, announced of the polio situations taken in $ would be held at ; members of the ; society and interne mayor's cham-2 today at 5 p. m. cases of infantile siiord, said Mayor &ve it sensible to 2taa in view of the * oisease in other roops Move Son for * Assault --VBattle-hard-^ men moved into �;   the next great ^ vater barrier, faring their path Ned Gothic Line, r^nny troops and ^th Army, many ot the bloody ^Volturno, Sangro vailed only for if *a *� pockets of completion by Nations for the v^Qsnaans, grimly t f Uce of Allied r that *ere left ailes east of 12 miles Handful of Gestapo Agents and Police Left to Cover French, Spanish Frontier Rain, Spain, Aug. 7. -German forces � In southwestern Prance, whose communications are seriously menaced by the American drive eastward Into France, began a full-scale evacuation last night, it was learned here today, leaving only a handful of Gestapo agents and gendarmes to cover the French-Spanish frontier. Regular army forces moved out of the region south of Bayonne over a week ago, leaving SS units behind. The SS forces in turn began leaving last night, reports said, and today only French custom guards and two or three German gendarmes were on duty at the international bridge across the Bidassoa river here. As the Germans moved north from Hendaye, Biarritz, Bayonne and Bordeaux, French Maquis several hundred strong in a daring raid struck railroad communications on the outskirts of Bayonne, dynamiting a bridge north of the city last night, thus cutting a direct line from Bordeaux. German police forces at the Hendaye bridge maintained the evacuation of the troops was a "purely temporary withdrawal" due to the re-alignment of the border region forces. Frenchmen living on the Spanish side of the frontier, however, are convinced the Nazi high command is abandoning Southwestern France. IK-  ^-UPj-On-^s&Tas reported h^^Z to 50 the sate June 1. 7 W&o sufferers g�ftafe the city local hospitals Biddle Assures Dies PAC Probe Is Being Made Washington, Aug. 7. -(^-Attorney General Francis Biddle assured Rep. Dies (D-Tex) today that the Justice Department Is investigating activities of the CIO Political Action Committee but not, he said, alleged violations of the Hatch act by government employes. Cases involving the. Hatch act restricting political activity of federal employes, Biddle said, axe handled by the government agencies hiring them. _ Dies, chairman of the House committee investigating un-American activities, had called on Biddle to take immediate steps to "comet what the Texan called political abuses practiced by the PAC. � also urged the attorney general to ascertain If government officials who he said had been active in PAC work, had violated the Hatch act. Two Army Fliers Die in Plane Crash Rome. s;yJ*^1 P)- Russian troops, attacking a bitterly-resisting foe beyond the Vistual River in Southern Poland, yesterday smashed to within 25 miles of the German stronghold of Kielce, while other Soviet forces in the Carpathian mountains reconquered the last of 2,000 Galicia noil wells which had been feeding the Nazi war ma- j chine. Two orders of the day announced the fall of the oil center of Boryslaw in the Carpathians and the seizure of Sambor, a communications hub whose capture gave the Russians firm grips on five routes leading into nearby Czechoslovakia. Simultaneously, three other powerful Soviet armies far to the north began a great pincers movement on German East Prussia along a 200-mile front, which was being savagely defended by reinforced German troops. Marshal Ivan S. Konev's First Ukraine Army captured 60 localities yesterday in expanding its bridgehead west of the Vistula. The Russians now have seized 650 square miles on the west bank of the Vistula in a drive which has* rolled northwest to within 37 miles of Krakow, last big German bastion before Silesia. In the north, Gen. Ivan C. Bag-ramian's First Baltic Army struck out suddenly yesterday in a twin drive toward Tilsit and Memel, key East Prussian cities. In Eastern Latvia and Southern Estonia two other Russian armies were herding these German troops westward toward Riga. The daily bulletin said the railway and highway between Madona and Gulbene, 80 miles east of Riga, had been cut in this steady advance. � Presidential Citation Awarded Sgt. F. Wagner, Killed April 4, 1943 4 � ^ -1 � Mrs. Catherine Wagner of West Washington street recently received a Presidential Citation in memory of her son, Staff Sgt. Francis L. Wagner, who was killed in action on April 4, 1943, in the North Africa theater. The citation, signed by President Roosevelt, reads as follows: In Grateful Memory of Staff Sergeant Francis L. Wagner, A. S. No. 33223049 who died in the service of his country in the North African area, April 4, 1943. He stands in the unbrokc-n line of patriots who have dared to die that freedom might live, and grow,, and increase its blessings. Freedom lives, and through it, he lives-in a way that humbles the undertakings of most men. 65-Foot Water Well Gushes Oil at Rate Of Barrel an Hour, Butler, Pa., Aug. 7 CffJ^-A.'W-foot well which Cooney Ball of nearby Greece City hoped would produce water and instead produced oil early last week, today * began gushing the black gold at the rate of a barrel an hour. With oil selling at $3.40 a barrel, Ball's "water well" promised to bring in approximately $80 daily. Oilmen, mystified by the flow which comes from none of the familiar sands, attributed it to a "water push." Col. McNair, Son Of Late General, Killed in Guam Truck Strikers Cause Tieup Washington, Aug. 7. -(&)- The death in Guam of Col. Douglas McNair, 37, only son of the late Lt Gen. Lesley J. McNair was announced today by the War Department. The circumstances of his death were not reported in the news message which the War Department received from his commander, Maj. Gen. A. D. Bruce, commander of the 77th division now in action on Guam. General McNair, the colonel's father, former commander of the Army ground forces, was killed by a prematurely-released bomb of art American plane while he was observing a front-line action near St. Lo in Normandy on July 25. Surviving young McNair are his widow, Mrs. Freda McNair, and their infant daughter, Bonny Clare, of Santa Barbara, Calif., and his mother, who lives in Washington, D. C. News Guild Members Asked to Support FDR Milwaukee, Aug. 7.-(vP)-Members of the American Newspaper Guild were called upon today to work actively for a fourth term for President Roosevelt and to support candidates endorsed by the Political Action Committee of the CIO in the primaries, but delegates to the guild's 11th annual convention awaited a report of a poll among the membership before acting on the suggestions. � - GOP Plans to Unfold Strategy Election Day h- Indianapolis, Aug. 7.--(#)-Republican National Chairman Herbert Brownell, Jr., said at a press conference today that full details of the 1944 G.O.P. campaign would not be unfolded until three months from today-when polls open for voting -and meantime the party's strategy would be "to keep the opposition guessing." Three-State Strike In Midwest: Central-Pennsylvania Hit (By the Associated Press) With Philadelphia's transportation system restored to normal yesterday (Monday,) the transport labor spotlight shifted to the Midwest, where a three-state strike of over-the-road AFL truck drivers spread to ' Des Moines and six other Iowa cities. The new disputes brought to almost 5,000 the number of drivers and helpers not working in St. Paul Minneapolis, Omaha, Kansas City and Iowa. A Montreal, Que., tramways walkout and 20 continuing strikes throughout the nation kept an additional 15,500 workers from their jobs. Over-the-road movement of vital war material was crippled badly in Central Pennsylvania by a walkout of hundreds of truck drivers. The War Labor Board at Washington ordered the strike "terminated immediately." Lancaster Draft boards cancelled occupational deferments of strikers in a "work or fight" ultimatum. The dispute was between trucking operators and the Brotherhood of Teamsters, Chauffeurs, Warehousemen and Helpers (AFL) over a new contract to replace one which expired April 19. The return of 6,000 Philadelphia Transit Workers coincided with weekend settlements by 7,000 employes ot five General Motors Corporation plants at Detroit and 1,400 glass workers of the Ottawa, 111., plant of the Libbey-Owens-Ford company. Disputes involving 1,200 persons at the St. Louis Car company and the same number at the Chicago Screw company remained unsettled. Another 1,200 employes remained away from their jobs at the Carbondale, HI., ordnance plant, and an additional 1,100 at the Marion, Ind., Anconda company. Sixteen other work stoppages involved 7.000 additional persons. You Meet Someone From Brooklyn Almost Any Place-Here's Proof -    Vannes, France, Aug. 7-{JFh-Every place you go you meet someone from Brooklyn. Two ancient trucks wheezed into the town square jammed with French resistance forces, guns sticking out in all directions. In the center of all this bristling might were four frightened Nazi prisoners. One of them, trembling in every bone, spotted the Americans.   He screamed: 'TchFreund! Ich Von Brooklyn r (I'm a friend. I'm from Brooklyn,) Tuesday Nazis Penetrate 3 Miles and Lose 135 Tanks as Push Is Broken; Scope of Attack Limited and Aimed at Splitting 3 Armies Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force, American forces drove to within (AP) 120 miles of Paris yesterday as their comrades far in the counter Norman tank divisions tried to split in half the three Allied Allied Aerial Might Hurled Against Nazis Dawn Until Midnigh Sorties Provide Land Forces Greatest Aid Since May London, Tuesday, Aug. 8 (JF)-Allied ^aerial might was hurle&rat the GerihatiS iii France from (lawn to j midnight yesterday, with warplanes smashing the shaky enemy from the battlelines to his vitaj supply centers far in the rear in possibly the greatest support of ground forces since D-Day. Rocket-raiding RAF Typhoons and Allied fighter-bombers, blasting at Nazi armor that was counterattacking into the heart of the American line across the base of the Brittany Peninsula, alone knocked out 135 German tanks and smashed scores of other enemy vehicles. At 11 p. m., 1,000 RAF Lancasters and Halifaxes roared over the British-Canadian lines south of Caen and dumped many thousands of tons of high explosives on German positions facing the Allied forces. Bridges, Railroads Hit VVhile the fighters and fighter-bombers were raking the frontlines during the day, 1,500 U. S. Flying Fortresses and Liberators hit the enemy rear in an arc running from Amiens, in Northwest France, through the Paris area to Bordeaux on the Bay of Biscay. The big bombers rained explosives on bridges, railroad junctions, fuel tanks and supply depots. Field dispatches last night said the night assault in the Caen sector compared favorably with the blows during the day on the German counterattack south of Mor-tain and aimed at Avranches. The American heavies over France (Continued on Page Three) Postwar Security Talks Delayed Washington, Aug. 7-(ff>-With the explanation that the Soviet government needs "a little more time" to prepare, the United States today delayed for a week The beginning of postwar security talks here with Russia and Britain. This action moves the date from Aug. 14 to 21, and, possibly by $oin-cldence lengthens the pre-conference period in which present negotiations for a solution of Russo-Polish problems may be concluded. Finns Act Slowly In ling Government Stockholm, Aug. 7-(/P}-Finnish political leaders were described today as "making haste slowly" toward formation of a government un-Ier the new president, Marshal Baron Mannerheim, which presumably will be called on to negotiate peace with the Soviet Union. PoUtical maneuvering continued in Helsinki without a sign as to when a list of new Cabinet minis-ters could be expected, said a dispatch to the Stockholm Aftonbladet. armies in France. 135 Nazi Tanks Erased A total of 135 enemy tanks-the greatest enemy loss in a single day since the Allies stormed ashore June 6-were knocked out by Allied planes alone in the futile thrust toward Avranches. Thrusting 15 miles beyond last reported positions across the May-enne river, Lt. Gen. Omar N. Bradley's tanks and doughboys ran into ttie first organized resistance In their dash toward t�e French capital, already being emptied of high Nazi officers. Even this opposition was not in strength, and doughboys, some of whom have advanced 115 miles in a wvk, were already taSfin^ of get-: tiri| leaves in Paris. The: figjifcing was beyond Mayenne and Laval, but specific mileages were not disclosed. Hard Fighting at Brest In the mop-up of the Brittany peninsula, hard fighting was reported at Brest and within two miles of the north coast rw-fc 0f ^* Malj. Fifty miie: ' of St. Malo, z~ American force occupied Guincamp with its network of highways. Late dispatches put an American column within nine miles of the port of Lorient on Brittany's south coast, but with the garrison offering to surrender it was believed possible the city already was reached.. Allied officers, acknowledging' the importance of the German attack on the Normandy-Brittany corridor, emphasized that Avranches never was threatened because the scope of the enemy counterattack was limited. ' Nazi Attack Wilts With Tiger and Panther tanks the Germans drove forward three miles   and   neared Cherence-Le- w Roussel, narrowing the Avranches corridor to little more than 15 miles, but there the attack wilted in the massed fire of big U. S. guns and swarms of warplanes. Then U. S. tanks raced into the battle and the enemy was driven back out of Mortain, 19 miles east of Avranches, which he had carried in the initial rush. Late front dispatches indicated the thrust had been stopped. This attack, coming at a tim� when the enemy's flanks both north and south of the bulge were crumbling, was described as a strong local counterattack and not in the proportions of a counter-offensive. (The Berlin radio, clauriing a six-mile penetration, gave strength to this view, quoting a dispatch from German headquarters to the effect r that the attack was a success in that it had foiled, an American attempt to crush the Vire salient with an outflanking movement to the south. (A CBS broadcast from Normandy said that at least 88 enemy tanks had been knocked out in this sector). Far to' the west American tank froces ran on through -Brittany, where they have captured 13,300 Germans and killed at least 3,400 more, and were fighting in or near-ing all the five great ports, Brest, Lorient, St. Nazaire, St. Malo and Nantes.  Enemy withdrawal from Paris was reported to have begun in the face of the imminent menace-U. S. troops rolling east along a 53-mile front, the British across the Orne river barrier, and the Canadians lashing out east of Caen-the last according .to German accounts. With nearly one-tenth of continental France now in Allied hands, the Americans and British were steadily driving the enemy from his (Continued on Page Three) t I - 4-^ h T � f 7 i h F r   

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