Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Bradford Era Newspaper Archive: April 27, 1944 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Bradford Era

Location: Bradford, Pennsylvania

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Bradford Era (Newspaper) - April 27, 1944, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                Independent Petroleum Association Opens 3-Day Meeting Here The Weather Bain Today, Clearing Tomorrow Morning; Continued Cool (Temperatures on Last Page) Em Oldest Newspaper in the Rioh Bradford Oil Field Published Every Morning Except Sunday The Newspaper That's Bead In the Home 67. NO. 151. (ESTABLISHED 1877) BRADFORD, PA., THURSDAY MORNING, APRIL 27, 1944. (FULL ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICES) PRICE FOUR CENTS i^anks S^ize Two of Hollandia's Airdromes Editorial {s to Directors of the IPAA Bradford residents awoke this morning to find the city j been "invaded." With this discovery came the realiza-t that "intiltration" by the strangers has been going several days. jr the first time in its history, the Independent jeum Association of America is holding a meeting st of the Mississippi river, and Bradford as the heart of ^Pennsylvania crude oil field has the honor tjo be host jits directors and those of the National Stripper Well sociation. Citizens of the city are wholeheartedly turning over {{acuities of their clubs, hotels and homes to the visitors i three days of sessions opening at The Emery this Bradford is honored to play host to the IPAA and its ^jand trusts that each shall feel the warmth of wel-| affiffld neighborliness which is characteristic of our city. ]J is further honored by the visit of Gov. Edward n, who will address the association at the noonday _�>n today. \ Gentlemen, the keys to the "High Grade Oil Metropolis le World" are yours. It is earnestly desired that you i every minute of your work-and play-here. It also _!hope of your hosts, that your meetings will be fruitful i filled with down-to-earth facts which will enable you I solve some of the many problems confronting your lustry. We repeat, "We are glad to welcome you to Bradford." Will Address Sessions of IPAA Here Essen Raided As Air War Goes Into 13th Day RAF Attack Follows American Daylight Blow at Brunswick; No U. S. Bombers Lost J. D. SANDEFER, JR. Pres. Stripper Well Ass'n. GOV. EDWARD B. MARTIN Of Pennsylvania RALPH T. ZOOK, President of IPAA 344 Opens 3-Day Otw 200 Members Expected to Register Jl Headquarters at Emery; Gov. Martin 1$Address Luncheon Meeting at Noon IIndependent oil men from all sections of the United Ste gathered here this morning for the opening of the toe-day session of the directors of the Independent Association of America. Also in meeting today toe National Stripper Well Association. Re filtration �t Emery For those who arrived early a field tour was arranged for 9 a. m., to visit pumping powers, drilling rigs and pressure plants. General secondary recovery field practice will I   *    1 11   1*   * ^ explained. lySlCal McdlCinC     Registration is scheduled at con-' vention headquarters in The Emery ich Donates 100,000 for Medicine 'York, Apr. 26. (3V-Bernard fSnneh gave $1,100,000 today to I the oldest branch of the wis, physical  medicine, & started among cave men with ! on of hands." Jltaneously the Baruch com-�� physical medicine, headed ' B�y Lyman Wilbur of Stan-recommended a "*We, scientific boost of this Particularly   for   returning  committee defined physical | 1 �tuse of light, heat, water, ^Ktricity, massagj. manipu-oerclse, spas, climatology *ology, the latter specializ-�iatbs, sprays, and the like. _t1* convinced, Baruch said, {'letarning men and women 'toe armed services will need "totages of physical medicine, 'feel this program will help ged soldiers to normal II �nd mental condition. My *i�been heightened by my something for the 700,-soldlers - men and try month. I want to do now, before I get RAYMOND B. MOLEY, Editor of Newsweek RUSSELL B. BROWN, General Counsel, JPAA at 10 a. m. More than '200 members of the IPAA are expected to register before the day is out. Governor Edward Martin will address the noonday luncheon meeting which is sponsored by the National Stripper Well association. His talk will follow that of P. D. Sandler, president of the association. Mayor to Welcome Visitors N. W. Shiarella, Owensburg, Ky., will preside. Invocation will be by the Rev. Dr. P. Dean Miller, pastor of the First Presbyterian church. Mayor Hugh J. Ryan will welcome the visitors to this city In their first session east of the Mississippi river. Parker L. Melvin, representative of the State of Pennsylvania on the Interstate Oil Compact Commission, will introduce Governor Martin. Another field tour under the leadership of David Scott, jr., and Oscar (Continued on Page Two) ericansNot in Combat p^jacisco, Apr. 26.-The ""mm will not use any 1 Japanese-Americans in _ as combat soldiers Japanese imperial army **lWsible enemy retaliation iierable confusion and J hazards of enemy infil-Army notified the war r*Withority today. V* Harrison A. Gerhardt, Is"! corps executive to the l^wtary of war, in a stately from Washington to the *B*  said "the use of ncans in specific units ? Opon any discrimination Many Danes Held As Unrest Spreads U. S. Takes Control of Ward Plant With Help of Troops Action Taken After Company Official Rebuffs Previous Efforts to Enforce Presidential Order; Crowd Looks on Chicago, Apr. 26.-(AP)-The government, with the aid of a detachment of troops, took possession tonight of the Chicago units of Montgomery Ward and Company after Sewell Avery, chief executive officer of the huge merchandising firm, had rebuffed previous efforts to enforce a presidential order for seizure of the facilities. -1 Holds Out Seven Hours ~ _ . I   Wayne C. Taylor, undersecretary Senate Board Votes Renewal Of Lend-Lease Butter Ration Value Slashed To 12 Points Stockholm, Apr. 26. (ff)-Hundreds of Danes have been arrested in Copenhagen and German armored cars are patrolling the capital's streets amid sporadic bursts of gunfire, Danish underground sources reported tonight from that German-occupied and newly-isolated country. These reports, impossible to check for accuracy, said widespread sabotage against the Germans was In progress despite Nazi threats of summary executions. Telegraph and postal communications between Denmark and Sweden remained broken for the second day. Boy Drowns in Creek Altoona, Pa., Apr. 25. (JPi-Gerald William Gonsman, jr., 7, son of Mr. and Mrs. Gerald W. Gonsman, was drowned yesterday when he fell Into rain-swollen Poplar Bun creek at nearby Newry, Deputy Coroner Edgar G. Walls said. Washington, Apr. 26. UP) - The Senate Foreign Relations committee voted unanimously today to extend the $22,500,000,000. lend-lease program another year, after a 60-minute session in which it was described as a vital factor in pre-invasion strategy. Asserting he will seek to call up the House-approved lend-lease extension bill in the Senate next week, Chairman Connally (D-Tex) said the committee "accepted the program as an "established war policy." Leo T. Crowley, foreign economic administrator, testified at the closed hearing that lend-lease and reverse lend-lease "have played vital roles" in the recent air offensives over Europe which are "wearing down the power of the Nazi air force to fight back when the great land offensives begin." The House passed the bill, extending lend-lease a year from June 30 and allowing a three-year period for the liquidation of its affairs, 334 to 21 only last Wednesday. Lindbergh Arrives In Hawaii on Mission Honolulu, Apr. 26.-(�>)-Charles A. Lindbergh has arrived in Hawaii as a civilian technical representative for an aircraft manufacturer, it was disclosed today. Lindbergh is on a mission to obtain information cjn the performance of aircraft in'the Pacific war theater. of commerce who was designated as the agent to assume control of the properties here, announced that Avery had left the premises after being assured that business would go on as usual. Avery capitulated after holding out for almost seven hours against a directive from President Roose velt authorizing the Commerce department to seize the Chicago mail order plant and other buildings on grounds that the management had refused to comply with White House instructions to extend an expired contract with a CIO union. The dramatic controversy, in progress since noon, reached a climax shortly before seven p. m.. when 32 military policemen equipped with weapons arrived at the firm's head' quarters in three trucks. There were some boos and some cheers from a crowd of 1,500 employes and others assembled in the street. Business Not Interrupted Lieutenant Ludwig Pinchure and three soldiers went to Avery's office while the other troopers were deployed .outside the structure. Taylor told reporters that the lieutenant informed Avery the place was in possession of the United States government. Avery, he added, (Continued on Page Two) Not Enough Voters To Organize Board Tionesta, Pa., Apr. 26. (IP)-Forest county election officials kept wondering and wondering why the returns failed to come in from the 14th and final district-tiny Guiton-ville in Green township. Today election Commissioner F. W. McClelland went to get the ballot boxes. He discovered there hadn't been enough voters to organize an election .board. Points for Beef Cuts Up Slightly for May; Lamb, Mutton Lower Washington, Apr. 26% (/P)-Butter will be reduced to 12 red points a pound effective Sunday, through June 3, Price Administer Chester Bowles announced tonight. Butter has been 16 points since October. The same order cut the ration price of margarine from 6 to 2 red points, also effective Sunday. Point value for farm or country butter will be reduced to 8 points per pound and processed butter from 6 points to 4. Shortening, lard, salad and cooking oils continue point free in May. Points for choice cuts of beef go up slightly next month, but lamb and mutton points will be reduced 50 per cent to permit quicker distribution of shipments of light weight lambs because of drought conditions. Veal points remain the same and pork about the same as for April. Lowering the point value for butter is possible because of seasonally increased production which is at the best level since last September, Bowles said. "A month ago, the War Food Administration allocated 151,000,000 pounds of butter to use for distribution to civilians in April or 13,-000,000 pounds more than we got in April last year," he continued. "Through the current month, sales appear to have been running below production. About 145,000,000 pounds of butter have been allocated for civilian use in May as compared with 135,- London, Thursday, Apr. 27 -(AP)-Heavy bombers of the RAF carried the Allied air offensive against German Europe into its thirteenth consecutive day today, striking with massive force by moonlight at the German armaments city of Essen and elsewhere in a methodical follow-up to a 1,000-plane American daylight raid on Brunswick and other targets. Great Force Out The Americans lost not a single bomber, but six fighters failed to return from the widespread and diversified daylight operations. Details of the RAF night attack were not available, but It was stated rithoritatively that the big bombers were out "in great strength." Essen, a frequent target, last was subjected to a heavy raid by more than 750 RAF four-engined bombers on March 26, and was hit by Mosquito bombers April 8. It hg� been called the Pittsburgh of Germany. Many Other Places Hit The major American daylight raid did not encounter any fighter opposition. Between 250 and 500 Fortresses and Liberators made the 900-mile roundtrip to Brunswick, dumping 1,500 tons- of bombs. A communique said the escort of from 500 to 750 Mustangs, Lightnings and Thunderbolts made no contact with German interceptors. Other targets hammered at Hitler's European fortress at many points. A supper-time fleet of light bombers plastered military objectives in northern France and Belgium imder Thunderbolt and Spitfire escort. Ninth air force medium Marauders, A-20 Hayoc light-bombers, and Thunderbolt fighter-bombers hit rail centers at Louvain and Saint Ghislain while Bostons and Mitchells concentrated on Saint Ghislain. Another stab at coastal defenses was carried out before dark by Mosquitos and fighter-bombers. Aussies Capture Japanese Supply Base of Madan Nazi Raider Hits English Shelter London, Thursday, Apr. 27 (tP) -A direct hit on a shelter in a south coast town during a German air raid early today caused iany casualties. The raid was brief, and the all-clear sounded. - London without any Incidents being reported. There was another uneventful alarm at dusk last night. (Continued on Page Seventeen) British Carrier Planes Attack German Convoy London, Thursday, Apr. 27.-yP)- British carrier-bome aircraft attacked a German convoy Wednesday off Bodo, northern Norway, and damaged four ships and an escort vessel, the admiralty said today. Allies Improve Their Positions Around Beachhead Nutcracker Drive of American Forces Closing in on Largest of Airfields on Dutch New Guinea; Enemy Resistance Folds Up in Aitape Sector to the East By LEONARD MILLIMAN Associated Press War Editor American infantrymen captured two Japanese airdromes on Dutch New Guinea, within bombing range of the Philippines, Gen. Douglas MacArthur announced today, while 500 miles to the southeast Australians swept into the town of Madang. Fourth Day of Invasion The Sentani (Tami) and Cyclops airdromes in the Hollandia area of northern New Guinea were seized by United States forces on the fourth day of their invasion. Their nutcracker drive was closing in on the Hollandia airdrome, the third and largest in the sector. The two columns, whiah hit the beach 34 miles apart, were nearing a Juncture in a battlg,; against mud and hills where the'Japanese strangely were absent. Enemy resistance folded up in the Aitape sector; 150 miles to the east, where the captured Tadji airdrome is being used by Allied bombers and I fighters. Onlv'lJ&hort skirmisft Receded their bccupatii/li of Aitape village. - Japs Flee Before Allies At Madang, too, the enemy fled before the advancing Allied forces. The Australians found quantities of abandoned supplies and ammunition when they occupied the once-strong fortress at the end of � six-month march over mountains and jungle trails from the eastern tip of New Guinea. Madang, on Astrolabe bay, has an airfield but the Nipponese have shown so little resistance in recent weeks it may not be of much use to the Allies. Strongest air resistance yet in the renewed New Guinea fighting was an attack by 12 torpedo planes on a U. S. destroyer at Hollandia. Mac-Arthur said they did no damage. Twenty-three Japanese planes were wiped out in a raid on Kamirl airfield, 400 miles northwest of Hollandia. American bombers returned to the attack along the northern invasion Five Moire Axis Vessels Sunk Off Sevastopol Large-Scale Offensive On Romanian Front Reported by Germans Allied Headquarters, Naples, Apr. 26. (��)-Allied troops have broken the lull on the Anzio bridgehead, improved their positions and taken prisoners in several limited attacks launched after a combined artillery and propaganda barrage, Allied headquarters announced today. The Allies lashed out to strengthen their lines as American fliers reported heavy movements of enemy motor transport on the highways near Rome and as official reports told of enemy replacements from the Russian front reaching the beachhead front. Common Pleas Court Jurors Award Damages in Three Cases Smethport, Apr. 26-(Special)-The jury hearing evidence in cases in the Court of Common Pleas of McKean county here since Monday, April today returned three verdicts. 24, A verdict of $1,200 was awarded to Ross V. Stoltz against the Lyons Transportation company and Ben McCreary concerning a trespass action following an automobile accident near Kilbuck, N. Y., on June 22, 1943. The jury also awarded the Miles Bradford company, Inc., of Bradford, a corporation, the sum of $2,500 in similar action of trespass against the Lyons Transportation company and Ben McCreary as the result of the Kilbuck automobile accident. In another trial the jury awarded Alfred Tate the sum of $150 against Russell Sweely and Margaret Sweely of Bradford. The case was an appeal from the December term, 1943. Evidence in the three named cases have been heard since Monday and presented to the jury for consideration this morning. The decisions in each trial were returned after a short deliberation. When court recessed at 5:25 p. m., today all testimony in the trial of Alfred Dieter and Edna Dieter vs. Milton L. Dana and Victorine Dana on assumpsit was in. The case is expected to be given to the jury for deliberation on Thursday morning. The final case listed for action at this term will be the case of Roy H. Grove and Nettie B. Grove of Bradford vs. the (South Perm Oil company and K. L. Willouby, of Bradford, for trespass, London, Apr. 26.-(IP)-Blasting at an Axis fleet presumably attempting to evacuate large numbers of the besieged forces at Sevastopol, the Russians have sunk five German and Romanian transports and damaged two others in the past 24 hours, Moscow announced tonight. The Soviet daily communique reported once again "there were no essential changes at the front" during the day, but official German and Romanian announcements said the Red army had broken the land lull by opening a large-scale offensive yesterday on the Romanian front, scoring local break-throughs which were sealed off. A supplement to the Soviet communique referred to continued activity southeast of Stanislawow in old Poland, where skirmishing has been reported the past few days. It said about a company of. Germans was wiped ouf and some important heights were captured by Russian tank-men. In another sector, unidentified, 800 Germans were reported killed anr 300 wounded and 20 tanks or self-propelled guns smashed in one of the bloodiest small engagements since the Sevastopol lull set in. In addition to the action off Sevastopol, the Russians announced that in the Barents sea in the Arctic, Soviet aircraft encountered "a large group of German transports sailing under convoy of warships, cutters and fighters" and that despite bad visibility the Russian airmen sank four of the transports totalling 20,-000 tons. The Russians did not say which way this convoy was moving. In the two naval-air clashes 2,000 miles apart the Russians reported a total of nine German transports totalling 33,000 tons sunk, with numerous smaller vessels sunk and damaged. (Continued on Page Two) Chinese Advance Toward Tengfeng Chungking, China, Apr. 26.-(/P)- A Chinese communique tonight indicated the Japanese had advanced in the direction of Tengfeng, pivotal point 40 miles southwest of Chengh-sien, in the bitter North Honan province campaign in central China. From Tengfeng the Japanese either could try to outflank Chinese positions on the Lunghai railway, which runs westward, or could guard their own flanks while seeking to eliminate the Chinese-held gap on the Peiping-Hankow railway, which War Department Disowns Remarks Made by Patton Washington, Apr. 26. - The War Department pointedly disowned, today Lt. Gen. George S. Patton's remark that Americans, British ana Russians are destined "to rule thei world." Reacting swiftly to the statement, which caused a fresh flurry of criti cism of the general In Congress, Secretary Stimson issued a memorandum stating: "General Patton was expressing his own personal views. He was not speaking for the War Department." This was in response to the following written query submitted to the Secretary by the Associated Press: "Does the War Department approve General Patton's Anglo-Russian - American 'manifest destiny* team to rule the world?" Patton, already in the bad graces of many Congressmen because of the soldier-slapping incident in which he figured during the conquest of Sicily, made the remark yesterday at the opening of a service club in England and aroused anew the ire of legislators. - r Search for Suspect In Beating of Woman Pittsburgh, Apr., 26. (/P)-Search continued today for a suspect in the beating and shooting of Mrs. Rose Casclotti, 40, last night. Police said Mrs. Casciotti, wha was not seriously wounded although four shots struck her aftgr she had struggled with the man ia a downtown street, gave them the name   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication