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Bradford Era Newspaper Archive: December 24, 1941 - Page 1

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Publication: Bradford Era

Location: Bradford, Pennsylvania

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   Bradford Era (Newspaper) - December 24, 1941, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                feather for Today Colder trf R�wrt on Lost Paw NO. Si. (ESTABLISHED 1�77) BRADFORD, PA. WEDNESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 24, 1941. 7500 ABC Net Paid Oldeat Newspaper In the Sic* Bradford OD Field Associated Preat Serriee Telephone 3m 14 PAGES PRICE THREE CENTS \ let ones V ^orld Land Heavy Force Near Atimonan Enemy Force 1Ki""' I Briton Voices %/ ;T IT   fl   I _M_B_!_._._MPMHHSB|MB __-- itrce Fight British Troops Fight Reds Retake Hongkong Governor timies in J�ps to Standstill     City as Nazis ;ayen iirtiet Filipino Hongkong Defenders Continue Fight With Undiminished Intensity as Nippon Forces Lose Heavily in Fourth Day of Attack fflope Hold Against -Attack (By the Associated Press) London, Dec. 23-Desperate bands of British, Canadian and Indian troops battled the Japanese to a standstill at Mt. Cameron near the center of Hongkong Island and still E IS- DAMAGED j held positions on Victoria Peak to the west, an official Hongkong dispatch said tonight. - Cross River German Units Face Annihilation in Some Points at Front Fighting continues along last; dlers was costing the Japanese heav- \t Associated Press) fa Wednesday, I^ec-;nights line with undiminished in-lily in their fourth full day of fight-KW Japanese landing j tensity/' the communique said.      ! ing. PANIC IS REPORTED i T * *u last-diteh stand of the Imperial sol- (Continued on Page 3 continues in tn*: 1 ___________ _ t force near Antimo- J Situation Unchanged ihe east coast ofj h? **n \u*ht fT* .   _    t penetration in the central sector in fftS announced today      direction of Mount Cameron, but !S. Army headquarters. \ this penetration has been contained soft is in Tayabas province j by our troops since early this morn-fl* mrrow land arm which J tog. ftemain portion of Luzon1 "Briefly the situation is substanu-feiMdSiera bulge. .   ;�Uy unchanged." p^t^M.t Costinaei '   otiier dispatches said the t'ald Die communique from Oglas MacArthur ,'ICfSllBg jma* r&xe? Japanese -for tiro days have been eri-kt major push on the asainet American and Fil-up, alio were declared to -� than firmly. j is exerting great presto tany spokesman said of Wm tattle. amy is particularly active it tuny points throughoutj Mfec Damaged a* But the hopelessly outnumbered defenders also were losing heavily, and their situation was acknowledged to be critical. Canadian Commander Killed An Ottawa announcement said the Canadian commander, Brig. J. K. Lawson, was believed to have been killed, as was his senior staff officer. Column 6) acArthur's head-i T _D* to the     Japanese r ire he~�anane*e for ia^f^v!u.     "     * On U. S. Sailors Sub an Crew Misses Men Taking to Lifeboats San Francisco, Dec Oil Industry Agrees to Limit (By the Associated Press) Moscow, Wednesday, Dec. 24-Red army troops, swiftly reestablishing direct com-i munications with the Donets basin and Leningrad in their big winter offensive, today announced the recapture of Gorbachevs 150 miles south of here, and the withdrawal of the Nazis across the Volkhov River in the northwest. A Soviet communique told of the retaking of Gorbachevo, an import-i ant railway junction midway be-! tween Tula and Orel on the Moscow-iKharkov railway. Other nearbyj points including Odoev, farther to Invades U. S. Wake Island Fate of Courageous Marines Remains Unknown OPTIMISM STATED _.     *- ** ��___�! (By the Associated Press) Washington, Dec. 23-An unadorned Navy report-"An enemy force effected a landing on Wake the morning of the 23rd"-put a great question mark tonight over a tiny sand-speck in the Pacific. On the face of it, that line in the Navy's 16th communique of a 16-day old war. seemed to bode ill for \ a handful of United States Marines! i whose defense of Wake Island has contributed to World War n one of its brightest hero stories. Does Not Concede Loss was the reason for pessl-L Feelings to Reporters Resolute Manner of Both Nations Is Key to Situatio NEWSMEN CHEER 4 1 SIR MARK YOUNG Sir Mark Young, above, was governor of the British crown colony of Hongkong before and during the Japanese "siege of that island. 7 Per Cent Return fro Investments Set by Agreement the west, also were re occupied. Nazis Poshed Back In the northwest, dispatches said,! the German troops who had been1 I trying since October to throttle Leningrad had been pushed back to the Volkhov, and at some points beyond | it, and were facing annihilation. Axis Army May Not Reach Base Imperial    Pressure 23   \T* river * "UtheMt of Leningrad Mounts in Libyan submarine bulk of the nation's petroleum in- f    . ... TtmMMnM . ft(Wl.f      _ v"    _       �        *" ______ j marauding    Japanese   suomanne | um-, u, - - !and th_fc action ^^^^ a Soviet aerial blow of late T* � American tanker off the dustry agreed today to a 7 per cent, j       _f mQre ^ _Q ^ if*-:. - nection with a final judgment clos- already was being repaired, the first Japanese hit on fcinnumerable bridges they a^st to smash in these Is- F .    w     - -iliNwpaUfB Sank interstate commerce and Elkins acts. $500,000,000 Involved The justice department had the heavy damaging of coast  Mfl^ marhine-gunned  its Dtte bridge at ViUasis       sailors as they took to lifeboats tt_T, the longest in * the j811(1 ***** **o\her tanker. is a vital link in the! . All 40 men in the crew of the the liingayen area,   (sunken Union Oil Tanker Monte-_temy spokesman said the j bello reached shore safely.  A few were injured, but none from rifle or machine gun fire. Tanker Reaches Cove , , The Richfield oil tanker Larry j char*ed that returns to oU com-Doheny, evidently fired upon by the Panies  from subsidiary pipe line same marauder, fled to the shelter i companies had run as high as 34 no official report*';of a cove without being damaged.   ! P�* cent* a year* Officials said that >tw> area, where the!   The torpedo which sank the Mon- ;*300.000,000 of  pajTnents over a teted on the southern tebeilo hit the forward hold, only j P-riod of >'ears TO involved in the fJBntoaon but press re-1 compartment not loaded with gaso- 1suit* 9m refugees from other! 1^. The men ftboard her wouldn't! suits were filed last ts as saying seven | have had a chance if any other hold * rear. These have been dropped in-�jRMpBhips were sunk in had been hit. iasmuch as those defendants are �febar and that defense j   The explosion was so terrific it m taking a heavy toll of j awakened residents on shore six . *bo came ashore.    ! miles away, pes report said four 1 Fired From Deck l�bers of a patrol were |   "There was a hell of an explosion," kgaspi sector on the; said Bill Srez of WestvUle, Mass.. The seizure of Gorbachevo like- limit on returns from investments in common carrier pipe lines. The agreement was made in con- I wise ^presented a gain of more Desert Warfare mism: Navy sources have freely admitted in recent days that Wake could not be held against any full J-:- dress naval assault. I _r    1 But there way reason for- 1 _Jlf|ftt* j mism, too. The Navy did not con- j JL-?lM"1 I cede that Wake was lost and her ! defenders beaten - and the Navy j had been quick to acknowledge the probable loss of Guam when that distant possession, almost under the ! guns of Japanese mandated islands, | could not be reached by wireless or [cable. , So the hope remained that the tired, sweat-stained Marines were still fighting on the few hundred acres of brush-clad upland on the! three isles which together make up' CHAPLAIN SCHM1TT Chaplain Aloysins H. Schmitt, above, of the United States navy, was the first chaplain to be killed in action. Chaplain Schmitt, a Roman Catholic priest from Dn-bnque, la., was killed in the Japanese attack on Hawaii. No More Strikes President Accepts Decision Agreed on by Conferees (By the Associated Press) Washington, Dec. 23-Winston Churchill, Prime Minister of Great Britain, seated at the side of President Roosevelt, told American newsmen today that recent events- the German defeat in Russia and America's entry into the war-had produced a turning point in the tide of worldwide conflict. It was impossible to describe his feeling of relief, he slowly said, to find Russia victorious and the United States and Great Britain standing side by side. It was incredible, he added, and anyone who had been through the lonely months ojL 1940 mu^ tl^a^Ood forventtyT   ' *   Reporters: CfieeYC^vdhttl It was such a press conference afl| | could happen only at a%ne of gravis : international crisis, the chiet execu- ) tives of the two great English speak* } ing peoples, side by side, answering* the eager questions of an electrified group of newspapermen, reporters who had lustily cheered the British statesman when he was introduced to them. It was followed by the first of a" series of staff meetings, as President than 50 miles for the Soviets, be- .__. .cause at one time the German arm- ing a civil action m which the gov- ^ h&d       fcrated {ar ^ of ^ ernment alleged violation of the|poirtt m thelr efforts t<) neclrcle ] 300 miles inside Libya, and the odds (By the Associated Press)        , , _ __ _ _     __ Washington, Dec. 23 - President!R��eveltfailed them which.brought ---------.........._------------Dnn,n.,nH\^,^v _ i_w m_r._M i together the commanding officers of W.ta island, and that 11^ forces of the United n i o,       * -, w   v !* chance to drive the in- ^1 ^^^^hT^tfS'and Britain ^ an effOTt w Cairo, Dec 23 (flV-Bntish tanks ;vaders back lnto the sea  ^cepUng the pomte on, deployed tonight along the coastal, Los5 WonId Be Great        ; which the^ ^nferees were in agree-; ^ plain of the blue Gulf of Sirte, on ;   Navv men knew> fwrther, that if; ment> toctading a pledge to refrain, wov.T-or. ,r~t .fe /._.�_. ______ hoM      i from strikes or lockouts for the,*1""**   ,     _      _      - Wake was lost, its capture naa cosuj � News Termed Good the Mikado's Navy more than it was j duratIon- f   rj^g wnoje picture was set against the Axis line of retreat more than Moscow. mounted hourly against the battered _^      _ , ,._.,,     ...   forces of Nazi General Erwin Rom- Pierce fighting rolled all along the j meU eyer m(ailng tanian bases. front, the Soviets said. TTie Red army of the northwest, led by General Kirkill Meretzkov, had raged westward for 50 miles from Tikhvin, its starting place, despite cruel blizzards and temperatures 22 degrees below aero Fahrenheit. (Continued on Page 3 - Column 6) worth in lives, planes and warships.]   As for the controversial closed ft mi^tary situation which found .v. v.   ^ sieePless Marines had fought j shop question, a letter the President, mo_fc Qf the news good news-Axis their Tripoli- joff 13 aeriaI assauUs ta the 16 days ] sent to the conference did not men- fo_ce_ toe|r Russian and jof war; they had brought down anjtion it specifically, but William HJ^ retr?ats and at a standstill The forward imperial unit, which ; unknown number of hostile war- j Davis, moderator of the conference, i oq fch_ approa-nes to Singapore, but have been astride of the coastal j planes, and had sent to the bottom j interpreted the letter as meaning; ^^^g ^ ^g-- of tneir' attacks road at some points along the gulf; two Japanese warships, a destroyer; that a new War Labor board would 1 on fche pnUippines : have jurisdiction over issues involv- j ^ ho^BveTt bad news and the troops now effecting a link; and a light cruiser, across the plain were expected to #*4b of Luzon Island. ! one of the rescued seamen. st Atimonan is the | _qOT they fired on us fro "I the among the 20 major companies, 52 common carriers pipeline companies and 7 other subsidiaries which joined in the judgment.   The agreement provides that: 7 Per Cent. Is Top None of the pipelines may pay, directly or indirectly, to any shipper- *!*ms_ have attempted! decj_; The fellows in the other boats ! owner during any calendar year more wei. subjected to machine gun fire." j than 7 per cent of its share of the 28th Officers Face Transfer from Unit Over Age Officers to Be Promoted spokesman declined to I   But the   marksmanship   of the valuation of the pipe line property be an effective stopper to any Axis (Continued on Page 14 attempt to leave the highway and - try to escape westward by desert trails. Pressure Increases A headquarters communique put it this way: "Throughout yesterday the pressure upon the enemy holdings covering Bengasi was steadily increased by the arrival of reinforcements, jvhile our mobile columns had reach- Column 3) Boy Dies in Blaze Trapped in Goset, Child Perishes j ing the closed shop. | from Wak_ wd thftt a Jap- / Points Outlined ; anese {one had iand[ed there, but Employer representatives in the:no information as to whether ths conference had taken the position gauant Marine' garrison defending that disputes arising from cam- ^ coral pin point had been forced palgns for closed shops should not to surrender. be submitted to the board. j        Churchill, provided with com- The points on which the confer- j jortable working space at the Whito House, had spent the day in a bustle I of activity, which included a confer- *s_i:fri_77~T_ --i   DUL U1C Vi "7^1 -- - r'-----*'.""'....'!   Indiantown Gap, Pa., Dec. 23 (W- |?total force involveatbut | Japanece seemingly was a_s bad as in | as determined  by  the  Interstate ; offlcers o{ ^ 28th Division, like nPttge 14- Column 2) Kes,4Hurt ' most of their other attacks on�Commerce commission i American shipping off the Califor- those in other field forces, are be- (Continued on Page 2 - Column S) (Continued on Page 14-Column 6) Excess earnings by the pipelines I ^ fihifted to other units tf they.re over age for their grade. ence agreed were: The points of -agreement /were: M   /�                  l- There sha11 ^ no strikes 0rence with Lord Halifax, the British Ottawa, Dec. 23. (JP) - Bobby j lock0uts during the war.              I Ambassador here, and diplomatic Fisher couldn't wait for Christmas, j   2. All disputes shall be settled by j _ ed the coastal plain of the gulf of j   He nad caught furtive glimpses; peaceful means. j Continued on Page J - Column 2) Sirte south of Bengasi. of a closet packed with gifts, so;   3. The President shall set up a today he went exploring. ; war Labor board to handle disputes. The closet door swung shut behind j   This formula designed to guaran-; him, but six-year-old Bobby was � tee uninterrupted war-time indus- "It is now reported that along the whole line of the enemy's retreat west of Mekili the countryside Is littered with abandoned material. IffliExplosion.Fresi, German Troops March South Toward Spanish Border it The War Department recently or- [ overtaken by our pursuing dered "over age and grade" officers tro�P8 to be promoted, if there was a va- "During the night of Dec. 21-22, cancy, or moved to another fighting )one mobjlc columns carried prepared for that. He had brought: trial production was submitted to Many Germans and Italians have ! matches. � the conference yesterday by Senator The flare of the first match lit Thomas (D-Utah), associate mod- U. S. Citizen Killed Follows Fire Vder Factory *Dec. 23. Cff)-One i^Jf^ four others [jT?^y when an explo- ^j^J* * fire, blew off * tao-story cement block Hercules Powder was Leo Gross of *AJ*ny painter.   Plant & 8iTUthers 811(3 Gross flying debris as he 2* millright shop r5*^ the fire in the ^housed (?* � the fire was not li^ennined. Soldiers Parade Through Occupied France; Destination of Troopers Is Unknown an acid- Bern, Switzerland, Dec. 22 (A>)- Fresh German troops are moving down through the west of occupied Prance to the Spanish border, competent informants said tonight. The movement, so far not large, is the first in this direction since the fall of France. However, considerable German military equipment has been piling up on the Spanish border for several months. Significantly, the movement southward was noted just after Adolf ��. � whom *ere | ffit^. P^8 ^U \-   ^ blasted building, 5^ 21, of Andover, Dover, detained ^*^1 hospital in "not Eu8en^ Bar-**i and John Churl, �T leased after treat- _T^ _ �*cue squad took HP � nospit*!. of the Nazi land forces, I_ad declared only last Sunday that the German front from Norway to the Spanish border-and beyond to North Africa -must be made secure. ' It was not yet known whether the troops now being sent to the border were intended for service in Spain- perhaps involving an attack on Gibraltar-or for shipment to North Africa* where armies are on the verge of complete defeat. Travelers from Prance have reported a recent influx of German troops into the occupied zone from the east, but most of these appeared to be in the category of soldiers being sent to rest areas. (This is deceptive, however. For months before the assault on the Netherlands in May of 1940, the Dutch were lulled by reports that German troops concentrating on their eastern frontier were merely "resting" after duty in other sectors). Meanwhile there were indications j of a long - retarded rapprochement between Italy and France. A report from Rome said the Italians, like the Germans have done long since, were sending an ambassador to Paris.   (The Italians have shown unit where they can be elevated, it was explained by a spokesman here. Orders are coming through daily to this post shifting veteran officers elsewhere. Captains, majors and even colonels are being moved. The latter include Col. Henry A. Rening-er, adjutant general of the division who recently was awarded the 40-5rear medal for service since 1902, | and Lieut. Col. W. E. Pierce, judge advocate general of the division. Both were transferred to the Third Corps area. The age limit for a second lieutenant is 30; for first lieutenant. 35; for captain. 41; major, 45; general officers, 60. out a daring raid on an advanced enemy landing ground at Agedabia, (Continued on Page 2 - Column 1) up the beautiful tinsel and tissue1 of the Christmas gifts . . . Bobby died in the fire. In an adjoining closet, unseen and undamaged, lay Bobby's own present.)-a hockey stick, toy soldiers, tanks and a truck. (Continued on Page 2 - Column 2) U. S., Canadian War Groups Recommend Removal of Tariff Million Tons Scrap Rubber Available Roosevelt Endorses Policy as Committees Urge Speed of Supplies as Victory Requisite Pilots Die in Plane Crash Cuban Air Corps Chief Killed on Fog-Shrouded Mountain Washington, Dec. 23 (/P)-Removal of all tariff and other barriers which and coordination of the production resources of a large part of the con- .ight impede the flow of war sup- tinent of. Europe.   We must dem- Havana, Cuba, Dec. 23. {PPy-Commander Manuel Perez Alfonzo, chief of the Cuban arrny^ Air Corps, and another army aviator were killed today when their planes crashed into a fog-shrouded mountain-top about half a mile apart. Lieut. Efrain Hernandez, one of Cuba's ablest Kelly Field-trained plies between the United States and Canada and an "all-out war production effort" was recommended today by the joint war production committees of the two countries and endorsed by President Roosevelt. onstrate that integration and coordination of the productive   re- Woman Dies of Shell Splinter Injuries Washington, Dec. 23. (m - The American consul general at Hongkong reported to the state department today that Miss Florence Webb, a United States citizen, was killed there December 14 by shell splinters. State department records show Miss Webb was born in Shanghai June 15, 1908.   Her father, Percy - t Dickinson Webb, was an American Akron, O., Dec. 23. (JP)-Perhaps' citizen born in Orange, N. J. ! a million tons of scrap rubber is    Previously, in a message dated available for emergency use, Harvey; December 19 but received by the S. Firestone declared today. j state department only this morning, This figure is 20 to 25 per cent, j the   consul   general,   Addison   L. above the greatest amount of crude Southard, reported that none of the rubber ever used in the United! members of the staff of the con-States  in a  single year.   With j sulate had been injured. America's crude supply imperiled.' some men in the industry expect civilian consumption to be restricted almost entirely to reclaimed rubber. "War Tires" Made for Gvilian Use II sources of the continent of America : and  already  production  of  "war is possible through Democratic process and free consent. tires." made of scrap, is underway. "There is a vast amount of scrap To  implement  the   committees* j rubber-perhaps 1.000.000 tons aside In a seven-point statement of �statement of policy, the chief execu- little pretense heretofore of wanting- aviators who was flying with his tt� ewmMi-Italian J to make frienda with the French.)   [ chief, was seriously injured. policy made public by the White House, the joint committees first urged speed without regard to cost as a requirement for victory. "Through brute force and enslavement," said the president's accom- tive said he had asked all departments and agencies of the government "to abide by its letter and spirit, so far as lies within their power." He added that a study be made of tariff rSHsion and other panying statement, "Hitler has [legislative measures required to fur-secured a measure of integration) ther the program. from tires suitable for retreading, which can be reclaimed and used to ease the present rubber emergency/' Firestone stated. The president of Firestone Tire and Rubber company, added that his company would produce farm tires, as well as passenger car tires,! from reclaimed rubber. 1 SHOPPING DAY to Christmas Also GIVE Defense Savings BONDS and STAMPS STORES NKS POST OFFICES F h � a ^ i 1 i _h   

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