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Bradford Era Newspaper Archive: December 20, 1941 - Page 1

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   Bradford Era (Newspaper) - December 20, 1941, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                * for Today 7500 ABC Net Paid jjgft fallowed by mow gyiju snd colder SO. 48. OMest Newspaper In the Sic* Bradford Oil field Associated Press Service (ESTABLISHED 1877) BRADFORD. PA. SATURDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 16 PAGES PRICE THREE CENTS ongkong Area Still Holds Out Defense Offensive Along Finnish Front Producers Head of Bank to Arc Chosen m TAKES POST 1L Brooder was elec-iprifent of the Produ- gok and*Trust com-jncceeding the late G.ftml, at an election held yesterday aft- lythe board of direc- infer has been executive and treasurer, officers chosen yesterday � Kwer, chairman of the I t Johnson, treasurer; X'ttAinsoa, assistant treas-ilBaell Case, was named a Hid the unexpired term tie Xr. Paul until the Janu- jritno of chairman of the, ftfttted in the adminis-r-ihe.bank but the poet filled before.  Mr. stwly elected treasurer, office of secretary, Reds Throw Many Troops In Wartime Tragedy Into Attack Germany Withdraws Three-Fifths of Men Originally in Area MOSCOW ROUT GAINS JOHN J. BROODER ILS. Transfers 10,000Workers FD Makes Room for h Defense Employees in Washington (By the Associated Press) Washington, Dec. 19 VP) -;Presi-^ ,    ,   rdent Roosevelt today ordered 10,000; and Lake Onega. �rt�fiy held. Hc       government workers.* move �ut of'   - iBt-twsiw mitoU^ de. ie^r^ employees. (By the Associated Press) London, Saturday, Dec. 20 The Russians have opened j a major offensive along the ! entire Finnish front, taking ! advantage of weakened opposition caused by the German army's withdrawal of three-fifths of the troops it originally deployed there, British reports said today. "Dense waves" of Russian cavalry and ski troops were reported thrown into the assault with the support of guns and tanks especially designed lor rigorous warfare on this frozen front, Finnish lines Buckle A Stockholm dispatch to the News-Chronicle said Finnish lines buckling under the Impact of the; initial thrusts had been withdrawn to the north bank of the Svir River at some points between Lake Ladoga Congress Sets Draft + Wake Forces Repulse Two | Ages From 2 More Attacks to 44 Defending Forces in Complete Control of Manila Situation PROMOTE M9ARTHUR Roosevelt Gets Bill Requiring Registration of All Men from 18 to 64, Inclusive; Army of 4,000,000 Possible Under New Legislation Troops Fight Without Any Hope of Help Officials Refuse to Co Mill (By the Associated Press) Washington, Dec. 19 (By the Associated Press) Washington, Dec. 19-Congress cleared the way today for a 4,000,000-man army by approving and sending to President Roosevelt legislation requiring the registration of all men from 18 to 64 years old, inclusive, and making i STORIES those from 20 to 44, inclusive, subject to military service. Officials at Selective Service head- ent on Report Japs Holding Island CONFUSING r t .        , .   ,     ., _, .quarters said the registration prob- W a k e Island s indomitable j aDly would not      before -several weeks." Although the new draft bill makes possible an army of at least 4,000,000, there is no way of telling i whether that many men will ever -1 In -addition' to "The President's order was made also will continue as it ^ h iclude F. -Grow vice president; t^gg trust officer, and Other dispatches said the Germans left th^ Bnn: ill-prepared meet the slashing Red army offensive and that the Nazis remaining there "are feeling the anger which 'Smith, who said those to move will j has reinforced Finnish contempt as be* drawn from the approximately j the Finns realize to what extent the 11,000 employee PRIVATE TIITTLE Private Eugene Tuttle, 19, above, waa held by the sheriff of Los Angeles, Cat., county on suspicion of murder following the shooting of Mrs. Adele Brandel, 52, when her husband, Dr. Harry Brandel, misconstruing Tattle's purpose, failed to stop his car when Tattle ordered them to halt. Military authorities had surrendered Tut-* Ue < the sheriff? office. Tuttle admitted firing the shot. Employees End Japanese onslaughts. This good news, with word of an intensified enemy air attack upon] little garrison of United States Marines still clung tenaciously to their scarred and battered atoll tonight!be called to the colors. Secretary after beating Off two more!oi War Stimson has said increases , I in the Army would be ordered "in the light of the strategic situation as it develops." Both houses agreed speedily on| compromise amendments to the Selective Service act which War department officials said would make a total of 2515,000 men available in the next few months, in addition to the 1,800,000 now in uniform. This included, experts said, 915,000 men from 21 through 35 already registered and listed as immediately available in Class 1-A. They estima- *wly-elected assist- |puMic ^ Director Harold D of 12 Federal agen- i German, high command has been | using them as a puppet power." Others May Be Moved Finnish official reports tonight I Bafton. - assistant trust:;   ^ employees ^ be moved to St. j confirmed the- continuation of Rus- Louis, New York, Chicago, Philadel- ] sian attacks on the Svir River front phia and Pittsburgh- 'between Lake Ladoga and Lake Are listed 3he Producers Bank ly include.Dr. <*lit ith said "further studies are j Onega, as well as on the East Karel- 8,000 Plane Factory Workers Protest to Cut in Wage Plan ^ (By the Associated Press) Paterson, N. J., Dec. 19 (Jpj-A j work stoppage of 8,000 employes in Wfi*�jb~ �    t u       ! being made to determine what other; i�n front* T^e attacks, described j flVft Wright" Aeronautical Corpora-' *w?V�^'��?^^;lemPIoyees can 1)6 moved out of;as weak, were declared to have beeni Uon   tonte protesting management �.Xash,M. F. Shay and; Washington.  This is just the first;repulsed. , 1 batch." Jnilirho died November 21, j   ^ new and the ap- weteted president of ^ 1 proximate number of workers em- Hit the Wright Aeronautical Employes Association, Inc., an independent union, said night shift workers re- *tt founded, total re- New York-Patent office, 1,400. ,   Chicago -Fish and Wildlife ser-t ta the 15 vice, 375; National Park service, 175; .^Histence has grown tojoffice cf -Indian Affairs. 300; Rail-^w,i noteworthy achieve-^leflecte credit upon the ��bb (fficers and directors Soldiers Wilt Get Best Yule Dinner Nasi Division Wiped Out Moscow, Saturday, Dec. 20 {P)- . Tnist company I ployed bv        of the agencies at- Red armies pursuing retreating Ger- |� WHal directors' meeting; fect?d foii^; j mans through the snows of the Mos- 'fataaitatipn was founded in j  Philadelphia - Alien registration,! cow front have wiped out Adolf Hit- M-m had been head of j certification and research divisions j ler's 134th division to the last �anj nrftHllpHim af ^ nf lOi&Xhi, death. ! oI t^e j^^on and Naturaliza- j and in 10 days of fighting preceding j T�* Union Takes Steps Showers said notices of decreases in the company's "efficiency bonus" payments were posted at 4 p. m., and the work stoppage began as night shift employes reported for work at Plant one in Paterson and Plant four in nearby East Paterson. The stoppage spread later to two other Paterson plants and one In Fair Lawn, he said. Work was resumed, Showers reported, after the union posted notices asking employes to continue production and adding: "Your officers have taken, and are taking, all necessary steps to remedy this unfair situation/- the Philippines-its results still unannounced - summarized the day's operations in American-held territory, as revealed in the communiques of the Army and Navy. Command Situation it was supplemented, however, by an announcement in Manila, that defending forces were in complete command of the situation there, except for three small areas on which the Japs established landing parties very early in the war. So far as is known, however, they have been beaten back in every attempt to ex-J tend, their positions. Thus, it seemed evident to a capi-jtal busy with the legislative and administrative business of running a war, that American forces were doing every bit and more than could be expected of them. with one eye on the military situation, Washington, simultaneously watched Congress ratify a compromise agreement on the question of draft ages. All men between 20 and 44, inclusive, are to be liable for military service. All between 18 and 64, inclusive, must register. Mae Arthur Gets New Rank During the day, President Roosevelt nominated Lieut. Gen. Douglas MacArthur,   commandant  of   the ted the new bill would provide an additional 600,000 Class 1-A registrants from among 20 years old; 400,000 in the ages from 36 through! 44, and 300,000 who have reached the age of 21 since the last registration was held. By compromising on a minimum age of 20 for active service Congress cut off an additional supply of 600,000 potential soldiers. But with 100,000 youths turning 20 every month, congressional leaders said there was | every reason to believe that the Army would get all of the men it could equip and train as fast as it could handle then Under recently-approved legislation \ (By the Associated Press) London, Dec. 19 -A last stand garrison of British, Canadian and native troops was believed to be fighting on at separate strong: points on Hongkong Island tonight against an overpowering force of Japanese invaders. There had been no word from the defenders of the century-old crown colony since early morning, and officials refused to confirm; or deny Japanese reports that it was substantially in Japanese han^s. the Navy could obtain up to 50,000 (Continued on Page IS-Column 2) FD Fails to Get -1 1    - No-Strike Plan cuts in a wage-incentive plan, was called off tonight two hours after it started. William H. Showers, presVdent of |Army's Far Eastern forces,.to the fte bank opened, Mr.|tion sen^et 95o; Bureau of Old Age � fll *lecte? treasurer and; and Survivors Insurance of the So- j (Continued on Page IS-Column 3) flat position until yester-; clal gecurit board, 1,750, and Securi-~�tm elected president.; ties and-Exchange commission, 1,400. I�t antral years he also j office Space Arranged ynjeutfre vice president. I Pittsburgh-Wage and Hour di-tter came to Bradford j ^ion and part of the Solicitor's "JK^tere he had been as- office 0* Labor department, 550. rf~   _ wlth turkey and every-ploees*  Compensation  commission, mng frQm SQUp to nuts-^ m store * i for soldiers who must  remain  at Ration Units Smith said office space was being j ^ ^      and     te over ^ hoU. j arranged to these cities and the gov-1 .     . eminent would pay all transportation, ^ Quartermasters Corps esti.! * statement from the company's costs of the employes, their personal j mate(J         ^ anny chefg ^; world s. largest makers of airplane and household effects and also give j ^ abou(. m gnd a haJf t6mga   ttu^BonaJPflnrs capital city of Victoria was occupied byxthe invaders, the defeno>ri withdrawing to Victoria Staff  ^ that the fights Ing on Hongkong Island still 'overshadows ;that In other sectors." Ttaa former broadcast was German; the latter Japanese. The garrison fought without hopa of reinforcement or retreat. Its force had been split and dispersed in several areas to cover separate landings of Japanese assault troops, and the battle, apparently, was going on over a considerable terrain. j. . 1 No Chance for Heip "Heavy fighting is going on and the position is serious/' one British announcement said. Later, a spokesman added: "There isn't a chance for rein- cementi and it thus appeared that !*>rcement of Hongkong, at least for i a long time. The garrison has orders der the circumstances-had been far! to.,ho'd � at 8n ff?  4ed Pennsylvania mine per man-for the service's 12,i mess halls and cafeterias through- .   ,   . _ __i out the nation. And the whole meal arrangements to help these people (      es . and buy or rent living quarters in the, ^ diet , ^^J^^L,   � CQirf   �mJ   Here's the menu, which the corps "The action� Smith said,   was, ^ ^ t  substitutions and changes to meet individual tastes and local marketing conditions: Celery and Olives ^ Fruit Cup Tomato Soup Roast Turkey with Sage Dressing Gravy       Cranberry Sauce i Dec. 19 (P) - Local oards will be estah-, . A,n7,,-,n �i J^lvania immediately,! (Continued on Page IB-Column  ) ** Office of Emergency! "   9 grsr^ ra.! Gas Takes 3 Lives to be announced by Janitor, His Wife, Boarder Victims Bridgeport, N. J., Dec. 19 {IP)-Gas Oil Industry Called on to Hike Output 1,000,000 Barrels Daily Thompson Urges Price Boost to Stimulate Drilling; Vast Storage Program Is Advocated Oklahoma City, Dec. 19 (JPh-The nation's giant petroleum industry the conference all day that the union and management officials had not found a workable solution for handling future union shop demands. He told reporters at the conclusion of the conference* that Woman Attempts To Regain Child Ex'-Husband Charge With Seizing Girl Cleveland, Dec. 19 VP)-Mrs. Mor- rr- ,      _w Wo, +hT�*c i Jyn L- Brown of Clean, N. Y., testl- Tnen, they began new thrusts .      . .   .    - f ied  today  her  former husband rugged with mountains further inland.   They apparently were try- against strong and apparently unyielding British opposition as the probable preliminaries to an effort to take the town of Ipoh, the Malay- seized their seven-year old daugh-i ter here last Friday while Mrs. Brown was in Olean  to  remarry. Mrs. Brown is suing the ex-husband. the union shop difficulty had not "�^ carter, wWch kuUidetoe j ^ ^ Cleveland sales-k*o� y*~~A* \ main railway running down to Sing-}      J ' -^.^ apore and is flanked by mountains, j m*n�    regain the child, Santo. Strong Dutch action against Jap- , Mrs Brown said her newjiusband _ is a  five-figure   vice-president of ^Jl^oa plans for a,      ___    -  e Shooting Squash and Buttered Peas Lettuce with Russian Dressing Hot Rolls and Butter     Mince Pie Coffee and Ice Cream Assorted Fruits, Nuts, Mints, and leap ahead of 5,000,000 barrels daily Hard Candy as the war effort expanded. After the meal, there's to be "an j Latest figures of the U. S. Bureau informal entertainment session that of Mines set daily average produc- f Continued on Page 10-Column 3) Sugar Bill Passes . Benefit Payments to Show Big Increase the Daystrom corporation, Olean manufacturers of tubular furniture, and is willing to support her daughter as well as his own two children, whose mother died 3H years ago. Mrs. Brown received custody of Sandra when she and Roach were divorced last October. She left the child with a nurse here while she went to Olean, and Roach   then ! will be spontaneous and carefree, with army  songs  and Christmas carols. Corry Man Is Killed the shoot-teski, 28, found un-* scalp wound on Wattsburg, 14 miles ^ He was brought to ft1* Bowman said neighbors told him Mrs. -Watkins had been housekeeper for Schloarr before her marriage to Watkins two years ago and the two men had not been on friendly terms. today six hours after his automobile skidded, crashed into a stump and overturned near Beaverdam. Death was caused by a crushed chest, punctured lung > and ; fractured shoulder. tion for the week ended December 13 at 4,110,000 barrels. But demand through 1943, 19441 and 1945 will greatly exceed the 5,-000,000 barrel figure, Thompson said, and the answer he gave was new j fields and rigid conservation, with waste held to a minimum. To stimulate drilling, the Texan! proposed an increase in the crude] price, advocating a gradual rise to $1.60 a barrel, which "would in fact only bring oil up to parity with other basic commodities." tion's net supply of crude oil in storage as "dangerously low1* and said there was only enough above ground for 50 days at the outbreak of war in the Pacific. He advocated storing 60,000,000 barrels of of gasoline in underground concrete bomb proof pits at strategic points ! over the country as a war reserve. Navy Requisitions Goods T i Materials Held for Foreign Countries Taken Over Washington, Dec. 19 (JP)-Con- took the child without authority, gress passed today and sent to the, she testified. White House a sugar  control bill \   Judge Samuel H. Silbert continued whose sponsors estimated it would: the case pending an inquiry by increase benefit payments to pro- 1 probation officers. Washington, Dec. 19- (JP) -OPM announced today that the and 50,000,000 barrels |navy department had requisitioned more than $1,000,000 worth of criti- ducers by $10,000,000. The bill would extend quota and processing tax provisions of the The', 1937 sugar act for three years to December 31, 1944.   Basic benefit payments would be increased  one-third-from 60 to 80 cents a hun-! dred weight-and extended to Vir- cal scarce materials being held in warehouses and railroad terminals; gin Island producers.  In addition Hitler, Thompson said, went to! f0r shipment to foreign countries.   (the measure embodies child labor 4 SHOPPING DAYS to Christmas war with a year's supply of oil on band and Japan had one to two years' stocks stored. Compacting states are Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, New Mexico, New York, Owners of the materials, chiefly regulations hitherto   contained in firms in Holland, Switzerland and Sweden which had placed their orders before the outbreak of war will be paid under regulations established separate legislation. Senator O'Mahoney 
                            

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