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Bradford Era: Thursday, July 18, 1935 - Page 1

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   Bradford Era (Newspaper) - July 18, 1935, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                tftfOBire OLDEST AND f*g�� NEWSPAPER v***^-��rs� D. NET PAID /^BCTES DAILY OVER Andtt Bureau of Circulations NO. 223. (ESTA�L1SHEJ5~1877J THE ONLY PAPER IN M'K"F am COUNTY RECEIVING  THE UNRIVALED NEWS SERVICE OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS THE WEATHER Western Pennsylvania: Fair and continued warm Thursday and Friday, except probably local thunderstorms and slightly tier in extreme north portioi BRADFORD, PA., THURSDAY MORNING. JULY IS iaa j^ttee Chairman Says b htended to Replace NRA j^TESlfCENSING ptite Would Form Corn-to License Indus- tries Sending Goods Into istate Commerc New Bonus March Fizzles Almost Before Fair Start Washington, July 17.  ort, the rules committee larfor/years held  up  30-hour tf'Tfltiwiw fevdnm Appears Unlikely ffifo house members' anxious for s^br adjournment after disposal imjpr WIb desired by the presi-etoces for a floor show-eathe measure   appeared urging action on of But before Fish would telf them their meeting had been ruled against, he insisted that Kennety Romney, House sergeant-at-armst come down and read the law prohibiting assemblages at the capitol without a permit from the vice president and the speaker. Romney did so, after telling Fish "you are not going to get me in any trap, for you know the law." Cheer for Fish, Then Trudge Away. Fish told the marchers the law was clearly unconstitutional, but that he wanted them to go peacefully off the grounds. Robertson said they would abide by the law, but served notice they were going to get a legal staff in Washington to "restrain the sergeant-at-arms, vice president or whoever it may be from carrying out this law." At their leader's prompting, they gave a round of cheers for Fish and Representative Fenerty (R-Pa.) following them to participate in the meeting. BELFAST RIOT Power Company Named as Paying Messengers for Signatures P R 0 B E R S~H AMPERED Placid Denials Hinder Com-littee' s Efforts-Testimony Given 87,000 Telegrams Assailing Utility Death Sentence Sent to Capital in One Week __ (By the Associated Press) Washington,  July 17.-The deliberate destruction of records of its anti-utility bill fight was attributed to a power company today by a senate lobby committee witness. Italy Lays Plans Salvatoro SpiUla John Flaherty Dies After Car Hits Auto Convoy; Brother of Local Man OTHER MAN NOT HELD ^ Connery planned j perhaps  Friday, a ing for a rule to i� ft^pfriverBial bill before fiejitt&at should the rules ee fail to approve the re-a move might he made the legislation on the floor requiring signatures * would not apply to newipapers and magazines. Olean, July 17. (Special) - John Flaherty, 50, state boiler inspector here, a brother of Thomas Flaherty of 47 Clark street, Bradford, and a former resident there himself, was almost instantly killed at 8:20 o'clock tonight when his automobile struck a parked motor convoy at the western extremity of this city.   Fred Murphy   of Buffalo, transport driver, was not held by police. Murphy told Officer Stacey Val* entine of the Olean police that he had halted just inside the city to check his load, pursuant to regular orders of his company. He was hauling four new machines eastward. He estimated that a minute and a half after he stopped, the car crashed into the rear end of the convoy. The injured man died of a crushed chest, it was believed, in an ambulance bound- for Higgins Memorial hospital. The car in which he rode to his death was badly wrecked, the motor having been driven back to the dash board. Flaherty, it was said by relatives, had been returning from a business trip.   Dr. William Smith, coroner, investigated and ordered Murphy freed. The victim is survived by his widow and three sons,  Edward, Coupled was testimony that 87,-~ telegrams assailing the bill poured in on Washington in a single week. The record-destruction was attributed to the Associated Gas and Electric   company.   It -also   was named as paying Western Union I?*      R       J_ WUL messenger boys in Warren, Pa., rire DngaueS DUSy Wltn three cents for each signature obtained on telegrams to congressmen assailing President Roosevelt's demanded abolition of utility holding companies. Denials Block Effort Through the testimony ran a string of placid denials blocking the committee's effort to determine who burned a stack of more than 1,000 spurious anti-utility bill tele- AGAINST JENS Push Anti-Semitic Drive in Spite of Warning From Higher-Ups CALM REESTABLISHED Recurrence of Monday Riots Held Unlikely-Steriliza-j tion Plans Pushed Despite Catholic Protests-Press Raps ' Aerial Drive A gainst Ethiopia Babson Says Wagner Act Is No Panacea Although labor leaders feel they have scored a real victory in the passage of the Wagner act, this opinion is open to serious question, according to Roger W. Babson, noted economist. Mr. Babson's articles are a weekly feature of The Era. The release for this week will appear in tomorrow's' issue of this newspaper. General  Mobilization  of Ethiopian Troops Is Expected Today DRILLED UT STREETS Incendiary Blazes; Troops Recalled SNIPERS FIRED UPON (By The Associated Press) Belfast, Northern Ireland, July 18-(Thursday)- Disorders spread grams  in the  Warren" telegraph into widely scattered parts of riot- office� though one statement-linked torn Belfast early today although heavy forces of troops earlier had a   fear   of   imprisonment   for "forgery" to their destruction, before the day closed, Chairman appeared  to  have  the  situation Black  (D-La)  requested Western under control. Union to probihit" the destruction Fire brigade, were kept busy | |^ta�^elegrams aent within the One after another, Warren West- answering alarms   of   incendiary blazes. Shooting broke out again era Union employes asserted their yesterday, bringing back the sol- licence of burning the telegrams. j*    i �      j *     u    *t_   The committee awaited the appear-diers released from duty when the ance of R p Herron. Testimony Orange day trouble seemed ended, said he dictated the messages to No Casualties Reported Jack Fisher, then manager of the Lindbergh Inter mediary Victim Strengthened New York Statute APPEAL T0BE TAKEN (By The Associated Press) New York, July 17-Salvatore Spitale, intermediary in the Lindbergh kidnaping case, was con-. victed of violatng the state's new- ( ly strengthened public enemy law today by a magistrate who served notice on the underworld there would be no "quibbling" over the revised statute. Convicted with Spitale was Salvatore Arcidiaco, with whom he was dining when police arrested them under a law making it illegal for "known criminals" or men of "evil Atrocity" Reports From Abroad (By The Associatde Press) Berlin, July 17-Nazis today continued their anti-Semitic campaign, despite warnings from higher-ups, and pushed their sterilization program, despite Catholic protests, while the controlled press cried out bitterly against "Atrocity" report abroad. Though order had been reestablished along the Kurfurstendamm, Berlin's white way, and recurrence of Monday's anti-Jewish riots I if IMC 11)11? TWA IiAVC seemed unlikely, Julius   Streicher|HUHC  1U1A   1 if V  UAIO and fellow Jew-baiters  had other methods to employ. An article in the "National So- Rock, Burning Coal Block Path of Van Lear, Ky., Rescue Workers (By the Associated Press) - Rock S^^J^^T^*8?"' "S'SiS b^ked the path demand ""^\synd,cate seT�; of rescue workers tonight as hope d�S>If ,^L V", PSL0t waned tor th* lives of nine coal aeatn ir necessary, be forbidden to: 1.   Rent apartments to Aryans. miners, entombed about two miles from the mine entrance by a gas 2. Engagr^7nllom7stic"he1lp; "S?8*??* .     ^       ,_ ,  ,  - --~ 3. Attend Aryans as physicians    The blast cut off tne men* who        *evensh e��rts to get ready -----1 - were taking up railway track in an   " abandoned   section   of the or accept Aryans as clients. Retort Is Emphasized League Council Special Session Called for July 25 to Consider Ways of Averting War-Italian Officials and Press Say League Can Do Nothing (By the Associated Press) Rome, July 17.-Italy poured troops and planes into Africa and Ethiopia drilled her tribal warriors today in preparation for expected hostilities as efforts to avert war-repeatedly called futile here-continue. The League of Nations' announcement that the council would meet in special session about July 25 to consider the Italo-Ethiopian crisis evoked no immediate reaction here, though officials and press alike have said repeatedly the League could do nothing. Dispatches from Addis Ababa reporting increased Ethiopian military preparations followed yesterday's publication of dispatches from Cairo, Egypt, describing in great detail the African empire's assert- i _____ mine A Nazi retort to" the Vatican's Ifrom their on,y way out, the main strong protest against application! ^JT?**' and shut off ventilation. -----w     wa   uivu  Ul     CV11 I      �------ reputation" to consort with one an-    .25or mmistrv� announced: of sterilization to Catholics -new decree-legislation providing heavy* punishments for propagandizers against sterilization - was further emphasized when Dr. Arthur Guett, sterilization expert  of the other The mixture of races causes the swelling of congenitally   unsound Major General E. S. Griwood, the teleK�ph office there, and signed Ulster military commander, charge of the troops.   One of his first orders was to dispatch them names    taken    from    the took directory. Erie Manager Heard Also  summoned  for tomorrow Magistrate Nathan D. Perlman elements  n9 .       . . ^        . ,. was Herron s boss, E. W. O'Brien, in search or a machine gun heard .     � "    . Y* vz ,        j. an �"lcia* of the Associated Gas firing in Donegal street. --- ___ There were no casualties In the' the testimony late in the day, latest disorders,   in   which   the linked with an assertion that he fighting was done with rifles, fists, ordered Herron to destroy his machine guns and stones. The first trouble occurred at a cemetery where one of the six vic- city they would appeal, "to the Supreme I lhrion was tek�,     �^ 'IV----- 'cou* of the United States if neces-1 ^S^lS^t^^^ Obviously Shocked The , court's program relentlessly, despite Catholic opposition stiffened,rby the Pa- , -   oU,   � ,,   ^   findings obviously pal protest Informed circles said and Electric, whose name entered I f"0T": ^ twr� defendants. They the protest, would have little ef- office records of the messages sent McDennott, wno sa|j to Washington. ------..... L. S. Shew, Western Union man- had listened yesterday to a criti-! fect-cism of the new amendment by Assistant District Attorney   John C. _     . _______ * its   "loose |word of the vigorous note fro Disorders Not Denied If they are alive, miners at the scene said, it is a miracle. Their only chance would be to have gained access to the gas masks and oxygen tanks which government regulations require at certain intervals in all mines.; Officials Decline Comment. The explosion occurred this morning in Mine No. 5 of the Consolidation Coal company, one of the largest in the eastern Kentucky field. Officials of the company declined .     -   ------�- to. discuss the disaster, except to Malcolm MacDonaTd, colonial secre* confirm that nine ^ melt were tary, as saying before the House ef 'trapped; and to say that mine Su- Commons' thai: Efotisb military perintendent W. M. Gunning; was *orce& in Kenya, adj&ent to Ethi-a>-�---------- opia and Italian Somaliland, had for war. Offsetting Ethiopia's reported preparations was Italy's announced program of large scale aerial warfare against Emperor Haile Selassie's country. 24 Planes Already Seat Thre hundred planes will aid the tens of.thousands of foot soldiers already designated for East African service, the national aviation service disclosed, with General Giuseppe VaUe, x under-secretary for sir. probably c o rn.ni a n d i n g them. Twenty-four planes and 80 pilots left for East Africa yesterday. Official circles did not comment on  reports  from London:, quoting- ^ recting rescue work. _____ ^Rescue workers were  brought been   "partially   redistributed* is* The German press, printing no I from every other mine in this sec- view of "possible contingencies., est ~~J the j tion. One group came from as far that frontier." r s   of   the   Catholic-Protestant ager    ?rie- Pa- told ^ committee fighting since last Friday was being buried. The two factions ston- ern Union records at Warren be his  presence  and  suggested  too John and Walter Flaherty, all  of or farm products I Olean.  He was a member of  St. Donsumer, without pro- j Marys of the  Angels  church in Olean. y after leaving the farm. GOOD $bii, July 17. (Jry-The burets reported crops in are in good condition Soodi and heavy rains last SAYS STATE SHOULD REFUND $5,500,000 FOR COUNTY ROADS ed each other until a volley from that J?e. mvsteriousIy missing West-troops and soldiers'   guns,   fired ?T,�"ni0,L.r*50!???. at Warren Be over their heads, dispersed then Fired on By Strikers Returning from the funeral, 6, men,  carrying the British Union in replaced with relay copies after an effort to obtain the approval of those whose names had been signed to them. Senator Schwellenbacb,  perslst- Gould, mmasGTox ^Irlsy Tucker PW - Unless President sleji on the two public- =i Black - Reading, July 17. G^-Warren Van Dyke, secretary of highways, told a convention of county commissioners today, that Pennsylvania should refund $5,500,000 to counties for road work as soon as funds come in from the sale of the so-called tax anticipation certificates. Recalling that the counties were deprived of their share of the liquid fuel tax funds, Van Dyke said "there is no question in the minds of any officer of the state administration but that the counties should and must have this money refunded." "When the counties receive their overdue share of the liquid fuels tax, the state highway department can carry out with greater facility its program in the disbursement of federal funds which have been allocated us for highway construction." he continued. Jack, were fired upon by snipers ently questioning, drew from the from the Carrick Hill, Nationalist witness a statement that such a section. At Donegal street, at the course was suggested "so that if other end of Carrick Hill, there anyone came along and investigated was heavier fire. Police knelt in they wouldn't know, the originals the streets and poured fire into had been burned." Shew said West-the snipers' nest. Passengers lay on the floors street cars as police, riding in a small tank, fired a machine gun into the air to disperse gatherings. orders here _,__r. did not deny they had occurred. Screaming headlines reading as William* �^cv�ici, v "unjustified foreign atrocity cam- Charles Kretzler, Ji paign" "malicious   reports"   and John   ^ ~ "exaggerated descriptions" prefaced such editorial comment as: ^It would have been easy for *eign newspapermen to have witnessed how quickly order was restored." Press Cited Examples The Nachtausgabe, turning from in the controlled press against takes . of the men inside the ing   for   granted Britain's meesr ine were given by acquaintances acceptance of an Italian thrust into        - - Ethiopia.   The press pointed tst phraseology" had not permitted the Vatican, neverthless devoted entire as Norton, Va.  The company ap- Observers, however, recalled      Kingsbury,    Washington AMUSEMENT TAX GOES ^XZZfT^ 1rZ INTO EFFECT MONDAY �te1^ ~ ~- /(rw -. . With previous testimony showing Harnsburg, July 17. (JPh-tht de- im telegrams fr0m Warren and partment of revenue warned all 22QQ telegrams from Eri6( Pftf amusement proprietors today that BUck promptIy expressed the Pennsylvania s new amusement tax opinion that the total was too low> will go into effect Monday and and doUDt?d if "as much as one- - pcaue ana oraer may defense to attack said "No German not justly complain of reasonable editor ever would think of publish- regulation of their rights or of ing any of those " foreign  bloody their libery for the purpose   of clashes which occur daily."    It averting an immediate danger" he cited as examniee - MISS GRAIN REAPPOINTED Messrs. the  dou- C^power lobby investi-out to be a dud. the utilities are itch fight for all Their success-of   protestant taught a useful corporations beset by *tlicies.   Prospective and railroad legls-"ographing lists of as to play   the the utilities get vast expenditure bly $2,000,000 - in e" campaign, busi-fonn of dominance 'ttlize that they are *1gh stakes.   That's e* rejoice at   the their enemies. Per- Endicott, N. Y, July 17. (ft-.Miss Margaret L. Crain of East Aurora, "other girl" in the "American tragedy" slaying of Frieda McKechnie at Wilkes-Barre, Pa., for which Robert Lee Edwards was electrocuted last month, today was reappointed supervisor of music in the public schools of this village. as one messages   would Kia*iirt   un�.   Kaoti I originate in these two towns." blanks   have   been I   Mter adjournment for the nignt they must obtain permits from the fortieth of \� state to operate. Application T?*d* ^JSS^^JS^ oh BIack teIkinS with reporters, made district offices ^d �^ the point that Kingsbury's total, tamed from the department of of CQ dM nofc incl�d teie: revenue. Each permit will cost $1.00.        s sent b the Postal TeIe     h Every patron will pay a one- companv - Plump,  blonde  Margaret Waley, who preferred life behind bars to freedom   without   her   kidnaped husband, was sentenced today to rivalries among 20 years' imprisonment for her ^netft them. You part in the George Weyerhaeuser sincerity   of the kidnaping. Federal Judge E. E. Cushman pronounced sentence. He presided at the trial terminated Saturday in her conviction on "Lindbergh law" violation and kidnaping conspiracy charges. -----*t investigators by n-*J*t happens to the pro-jr*Souse and senate sleuths forces and finances. rjft-- House Rules Chair-Senator * *Jthourt he dares t0 *imoSh . susPected of -^tinns *** turn "P has Arthur F. Christenson, Warren office operator, was the witness who indirectly attributed the "forgery" remark to Herron. He also quoted Herron as saying his superiors had directed the destruction of "all records of any messages" sent. Coin cidentally, the house rules committee, also digging into lobbying for and against the utility measure, concluded its inquiry into allegations that the administration used threatening tactics to obtain votes for the holding company "death sentence." In rebuttal, Rep. Brewster (R-Me) backed by his secretaries, insisted said. The magistrate contended that the law places "no great burden on thieves and criminals who consort with each other to explain the purpose of their meeting and association." Taking cognizance of the fact that Arcidiaco, although often arrested, never had been convicted of a crime. Magistrate Perlman said it was "logical to assume that the legislature did not intend to limit the application of the statute to only those persons who have been previousely convicted." DOG SHOW JUDGES Philadelphia, July 17 OP)-Governor and Mrs. Earle will act as judges at the dog show of the Kennel Club of Philadelphia. The two-day show opens in Convention Hall November I. as examples "the lynching of two negroes at Columbus and strikes at Tocoma in which 50 persons, seriously injured, were treated in hospitals. However, the newspaper overlooked the fact that the United j States lynching reports were delivered to the German press by the official agency and were printed in several newspapers July 16. Likewise headlines such as "extortions in Belfast" and "Armored police cars against mob" have made German readers familiar with disorders in Ireland. and Sherley Kufford. Only Ones in Mine. Since the mine had been idle for days, these nine men and three nouncing, through the columns -* others, headed by "fire boss" Stan- the newspaper Osservatore Romano, ley Crane, working some distance that Catholic missionaries, far from Catholic Missionaries Stay. Meanwhile, the Vatican took official cognizance of the crisis by an- away, were the only workers in the evacuating Ethiopia, were remain-mine at the time of the blast. ing at their posts in Addis Ababa Crane,   with   Anse Wilson and and Kaffa province. Only four sis-another man whose name was not ters, who were ill, have returned to �-----� ----- * anaged Italy, the anouncement says. ^---ier Mussolini, who protested learned, were injured but to crawl to safety. The mine is of the type known as to two American interviewers last a "drift" mine, having pasageways night that Italy's East African branching out from the hillside en- course   had   not   been   properly trance like fingers. Van Lear is in Johnson county, understood abroad, conferred with the French and Japanese ambassa- COMMISSIONERS TO CONVENE IN 1936 about five miles from Paintsville, dors yesterday. The later assured and approximately 60 miles south him that Japan, reports to the con-of Ashland. trary notwithstanding, had no in- terest in East Africa and would not intervene. Reports from Paris that British and French diplomats continued conferences in an attempt to avert Mrs. Ida Funk, 63, of 26 Howard war' ^rou8h. *Pj�*>atic negotia- street, a resident oi Bradford for '10n.s have a^eady. bee.f business - and war inevitable-appeared   in   the officially inspired MRS. IDA FUNK, 63 DIES AT HOSPITAL LABORER KILLED young woman stood silently before Judge Cushman. She did not open that Thomas Corcoran, administrator mouth when asked if she had I tion aide, threatened to stop work anything to say. She had said it already. Last Saturday, as the jury de- on the Passamaquaddy dam in his district unless he voted with the administration.     Corcoran     was liberated  her case,  Mrs. Waley equally firm in repeating his de- amazed a jail attendant by exclaiming: "My goodness! I hope they don't acquit me." Throughout tfce trial, she maintained that the fugitive William Dainard-more commonly known by his alias, William Mahan-was nial of such statements. Brewster said he would sacrifice his reputation if necessary, for the "Quoddy" project. TWIN* ARMADILLOS BORN The 39-year-old wife of Harmon the "brains" of the plot. She said M. Waley will serve her time at he planned the kidnaping of the boy, held eight days and released the federal detention farm at Milan,     . Mnnnnft MMart Mich, Waley vowed his wife was June 1 for $200,000 ranso innocent when he pleaded guilty to like charges in the $200,000 ab- John F. Dore, appointed by the __court to defend Mrs. Waley, moved ber for an arrest of judgment and a -........a ,, ,fc JIc- new trial at the arraignment to- Neil island federal prison near day. He was promptly overruled, here. Dore   indicated   an   appeal   was With no show of emotion, the doubtful. I �s starts ! ducti�n of the nine-year old luml lines   xT out a!onS heir- H* is serving 45 �ears at Mc- He wants to----- 00 **ge Four) Philadelphia, July 17 (flV-Twin armadillos were born at the Philadelphia Zoological Gardens today, but a raciMon stole into their cage 1 and killed one before guards could interfere. 22 HIRED, 13 FIRED Harrisburg, July 17. (TP)-The department of labor and industry hired 22 new employes, dismissed 13. Philadelphia, July 17. {JPh-Tony Lango, 43, a laborer, stood up in a ditch running between the rails of a trolley line, and was killed. He failed to see an approaching trolley. �    ^__   _ Young American Male Is As Sappy as the Female Santa Monica, Calif., July 17.- Every morning some state court declares "so and so tax declared -~~ illegal."   If   this keeps on everybody will get back everything they paid in; in other words the ay the courts re going now, hey may declare his whole de-ression and everything connected with it illegal, and that it all has to be done over again. Say that judge will r06ers sure give European fortune hunters fits; it's generally men that do, it, but this time the past 45 years, died at 2:30 o'clock this morning at Bradford hospital.   She had been admitted Ipress W1171111 A UCDADT1Sundav for an emergency operation tt 1LL1 Alflui UK 1 (and had not properly recovered. Born in   Sweden,   she came to MARGIOTTI ASKS Reading, July 17 Ernest P. Canada when about 15 and later Posey, Berks county commissioner] moved to Bradford. Surviving her was elected president of the Penn- are one son� Cart Johnson; two sylvania county commissioners' as- daughters, Mrs. William Bartoo and CHECK ALLEGED FAKE TELEGRAMS sociation at the closing session of their convention today. rs. Forrest Franks, all of Brad-    Harrisburg, July 17. (&-.Attor-ford,   several   stepsons  and step- nev General Charles J. Margiotti The convention picked Williams- daughters, one of whom is Mrs. 2!�5Cted# SStrxct Attorne? G* port to be the next conTon Howard Buchanan of Custer City; ^L^.^l^0^ lT**? to city.  Other officers elected: First vice president, Mrs. Helen Schuraff, Erie; second vice president, John N. O'Neil, Washington; secretary-treasurer, Raymond W. Sayer, Cumberland. grandchildren,   Arlene and I mvestigate charges that hundreds to Helen Johnson and Betty, Porothy 2f f?ked telegrams were sent daka-* -D�-f��        n,-nfn.n__a u-   J-  -Unscoii,   member  of  the brothers in Sweden. The Koch funeral home will be in charge of the funeral. Says Strawser Admits Tale Blaming Other Man Was Lie and Robert Bartoo, and sisters and national nouse of representatives, w,,flM     Q"""^" urging him to vote against the so called death sentence clause of the utility bill. The clause would eliminate holding companies. Margiotti pointed to a Pennsylvania law which provides $500 fine and a year's imprisonment for sending forged or faked telegrams. Middlebrug, July 17 (JPh-Corporal John P. Herman of the state police said today that Sherman Strawser, condemened slayer, admitted to him that his story blaming another man for the murder of Charles Gable was a lie. Strawser, under sentence to die early next Monday in the electric chair at Rockview penitentary, told his parents Newton Bingaman was the killer of Gable. The elder Strawsers carried the newest version of tfhe crime to Attorney General Charles J. Mar- it was a girl, who led our rich giotti in Harrisburg and he order-young hopeful astray, which proves ed a full investigation, that  the young American   male can be as sappy as the female. Yours, WILL. I talked with Strawser this afternoon and he admitted to me the shoot Gable and that Bingaman was not with him that morning. He said he would like to live." Herman said tears rolled down Strawser's cheeks as he told him he concocted the story. Bingaman, who also is known as Newton Long, was taken before Justice of the Peace H. E. Walter a few minutes after confession and released for lack of evidence. Dr. W. C. Sandy of the Stae Bureau of Mental Health questioned Strawser for two. hours today. He will make a confidential report to Margiotti. After Strawser's latest story exploded. Sheriff Carl Runkle prepared to take his prisoner to Rock- Third of Striking ML Jewett Workers WiU Return Today whole thing was a He.". Herman j view. The trip probably will be said.  "He said Bingaman did not j made Friday. Mt. Jewett, July 17. (Special)- With payment of the Allegheny Glass corporation payroll for June 24-29, 35 employes of the factory Strawser's | here will begin production work tomorrow. repair work on another tank, No. 3, will be undertaken, it was reported. The first tank has not been used for some time. The complete payroll for the week's wages for which approximately 100 workers walked out June 29, was on hand today. Not all of the men, however, reported for their pay.   

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