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Bradford Era Newspaper Archive: May 4, 1931 - Page 1

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Location: Bradford, Pennsylvania

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   Bradford Era (Newspaper) - May 4, 1931, Bradford, Pennsylvania                                J     4    - IIUNTCEO KEY PAID .mow orw MM flafly fMibUcfttiw tat largest ol any newspaper veblisbed is McSeaa ftuty THE ONLY PAPER IN M'KEAN COUNTY RECEIVING T. 3 DNEIVALED NEWS SERVICE OP THE ASSOCIATED Fiil.'SS TWELVE PAGES |g 54 NO. 1CL    (ESTABLISHED 1S77) BRADFORD, PA, MONDAY MORNING, MAY 4, 1931. PRICE TWO CENTS. GERM A N BOAT IS OFF AGAIN ll street urns death Pneumonia Victii Mm for Balama fwtagt** Aerial Expl ALL IS WELL esses tion So Expected at e Time Flies Midnight Las Palmas t �rllkD Last Friday, i i <yTfce Associated press) *'Sb Se 1 Oro,  Spanish Northwest ltty3-On another lap of its -projected ffilht to South America, the flying boat DO-X took off inter here at 4 a. m. (EST) ' Bolama. on the west coast H^af Portagese Africa, a distance of 950 huge craft, which flew here las Palmas, Canary Islands, last was reported to haw passed Blanco four hours later.' 6:30 a. m. (EST) the'plane ra-that it was about 115 miles of Rio De Oro and that the ; was progressing without inci-At the speed it was then rnaWnc, hip would not reach it* destJaW until sometime alter midnight ^oOannnnication Impossible May 3- (iff)-A radio mes-received here late tonight from fmbnas Canary Islands, said that titer communication was pos-,wttb the DO-X, giant airliner �n its way to Bolama, West he dispatch said the shiD Financier,   Philanthropist Dies of Pneumonia Saturday Night FUNERALlsTUESDAY Services Will Be at Tuxedo Park, N.Y. Estate-Special Train Will Leave Jersey City Tuesday Morning Bearing All Who Will At-tend Services. Tean M. Dubois (above), explore* and son of Or. Eugene Dubois, noted Dutch scientist, will start on an aerial expedition to explore some 50,000 square miles in Dutch Guiana in search of animal and geological specimens. . Much of the trek will be through the jungle. i- i. V- ^ * believed to he somewhere Senegal, en route JRP starts OH Pstfd Over San Lab toy 3 (JP)-A report receiv tonight said the airship DO-3 over San Luis, Senegal, oi liSar to Bolama, West Africa. Thi distance from San Luis t -Several farm \w9mk^fRLf: scattered sections were destroyed tonight as brisk winds fanned brush and n Cass and Itasca ooun-Jfarthera Minnesota. reported burning near Lake; in a sparsely settled of Brainerd and north Rapids and Deer river.- A -summer cottages were in the fire near Alexander Seiji Yoshiwara Will Cover 6J48 Miles; His God Is San Francisco \ ALONE; HAS^NO RADIO (By the Associated Press) Tokyo,  May   4.   (Monday) -Selj i Yoshiwara, 27-year-old Japanese flier, took off at 10:10 aJn. today (8:10 pjn. Sunday EST) on the first-Jeg-of a "*^2*8 mtle flight to San Fraaciao* via the Aleutian islands and British Columbia. Alone and without radio, the "Lindbergh of Japan" as he is often called, started his open seaplane on a good-will trip to America carrying to President Hoover a message from the Japanese magazine king, Seiji ! Noma, principal backer of the flight. To Go by Was; Alaska He hoped to complete the first stage of the journey to Numasaki, 368 miles north of Tokyo, before nightfall. The next jump would take him 297 miles further north to the extreme tip of Hokkaido island. Then his itinerary calls for flights over the Kurile islands to Peropavlovsk, Siberia, over the Bering sea to the Aleutians and after several stops, to Seward, Alaska. From there he would fly southward to Seattle, then to San Francisco. He would then go to Washington. The flier speaks English poorly but is better versed in German. He expressed confidence of completing the flight without mishap despite the gales which swirl from the arctic circle and the fog which.during May obscures the Aleutian islands more than a quarter of the time. Undeterred by Obstacles Even the prediction of Thomas Ash, jr., who is planning a non-stop flight to America about May 30, that "it will be almost a miracle if Yoshiwara succeeds" has not deterred him. Yoshiwara, who has been a licensed (By the Associated Press) New York. May 3.-The stillness of death intensified the customary Sabbath quiet of the financial district while a bereaved family prepared to bury George Fisher Baker, colossus of finance arid gentle-spirited philanthropist, whose 91-year career was ended by pneumonia last night. * It was Sunday, but resting in their homes, those who dwell in the high places of business and finance felt no unrest. George Baker had builded strong and well and the uncertainty and flurry that attended the passing of a great leader in days gone by was absent-a triumph of -organization. Many W01 tarry On Many men will step into the places George Baker has vacated and carry on the affairs that he attended to long 'past the three-score and ten years alloted to most men. At the Madison avenue mansion where the financier slept his long sleep, Frank Risavy, his secretary, announced the funeral arrangements decided upon at a family conference. The funeral will be held Tuesday at the Tuxedo 'Park, N. Y., estate. A special train will leave the Erie Railroad terminal in Jersey City at 10:30 ajn. Tuesday bearing all those who will attend the services CIPH HOUSE TO TAKE FINAL A CTION TONIGHT UP SUN N AY BALL PTI N Movement Will Appeal to Youth of U. S. Support 18th Amendment Pennsylvania State Briefs Associated Press) act is slate \ Philadelphia-Seventy men dis-i Detroit, dies of heart attack while missed from staff of James M. undergoing operation for restoration Hazlett, recorder of deeds, who says | of his sight. I OBJECTIVES! he has nothlns tov them to <*  3    GEORGE F._ I Colossus of finance sleeps peacefully away in New York mansion at the age of 91. t rescue flier Capt Albin Ahrenberg Is Well on Way in Search for Lost Englishman ICE FORMS ON WINGS Many Messages Received Interment will be in the family vault at Kensico cemetery. Hie secretary ' said many messages of condolence had been received, but they would -not be made, public. ^ - The thought must have come "to many today as they mused upoiuthe life and deeds of George Baker-that the six words he uttered in his'only public address might well serve as his epitaph and ebnediction. They were: "Thank you and God bless you." For his benefactions totalled in millions   more . than   the  average philanthropically inclined man feels he is entitled to bestow in dollars. One Aged Sentinel Left His death leaves only one aged sentinel on the'outposts of that last frontier that witnessed the hearing of a civilization of steel upon the foundation of a hardy pioneering nation. That is John D. Rockefeller, sr. The others-J. Pierpont Morgan, the elder, James J. Hill, Henry C. Frick, Andrew Carnegie, Thomas F. Ryan'and' others-have passed on. "While primary interested in finance, George Baker did much to make it possible to lay the bands of steel on which the tide of empire moved west-"ward while in the comparatively congested east his financial acumen conquered anew. (By The Associated Press) Reykjavik, Iceland. May 3-Capt. Albin Ahrenberg, Swedish flier who will search for Augustine Courfcauld, British scientist missing on Greenland's ice cap arrived in Angrnagsalik, Greenland, late today, after a flight over the Strait of Denmark from Reykjavik. The aviator had intended to continue the flight immediately in search 1 cf the .missing Engh^hinan, but he r*as prevented from doing, so -b^ for? mation of ice on the wings of his plane. This compelled him to land rt Angmassalik. Arrives In Five Hours Ahrenberg made the ��flight from the Iceland capital to Greenland in five hours. During the trip he passed over the Danish cruiser Hvidbjorn, which lies near the Greenland ice barrier. The Icelandic patrol boat Odlnn, which went to aid in the search for Court-auld also is in the Strait of Denmark on its way back here to repair its damaged airplane. Balked by Elements The Swedish flier tried to reach Greenland yesterday, but was forced to return here because of unfavorable flying conditions and the need of readjusting his motor. Two dog teams, driven by friends of the missing scientist, also, have gone to his rescue, but no word has been received from them. r 4 **th has been reported due to A settler named  Balm, Saturday in his home in county, was believed to victim of over-exertion in flames. ABANDONS   _____ Turkey, May 3.       Capt. Stack, who left Lympne, ipril 29 in an attempt to . tound-txip flight to Australia *Sdt:to 21 days, abandoned the bert today when his takeoff by battery trouble. % ME WHY ~% Tpu spoke of wage JiSi IS how a sm*U addi- 55*7 t*Py expenditure ' on Tr Part wnwiii ~ -4- a. _ (Continued on Page Twelve) TWO WOMEN AND BABE ARE KILLED WHEN HIT BY CAR -Westfield, N. Y., May 3. (fl*f-Mrs. Floyd Thomas, 42, Mrs. Alice Dins-bier, 26, and her one-year-old son were killed Saturday- night when struck by an automobile, which police said was operated by James S. Stone, Cleveland Heights, Cleveland, Ohio. Deputy Coroner William Crandall announced that charges of second degree murder had been placed against Stone who was released on $5,000 bail pending grand jury hearing. The two women and the infant f had left the Dinsbier home and were walking toward a trolley car stop when the automobile allegedly driven by Stone, in trying to pass another car, skidded and plunged into the j trio. After an inquest, Coroner Crandall announced that Stone had been driving "negligently and at reckless speed." SUIT FOR $37,500 COMMISSION FILED Pittsburgh, May 3. (/P>-Suit for $37,500, claimed as commission for the sale of Greensburg theatre properties, was filed against Michael Manos in common pleas court here Saturday by C. C. Hamilton and company, Pittsburgh real estate brokers. The plaintiffs asserted they were commissioned by Manos to find purchasers for properties of Manos Enterprises, Inc., including the Manos and Strand theatre and a leasehold on the Grand theatre building. Warner Brothers Theatres, Inc., purchased the holdings, it was alleged. asxunit i earner* But, do r i r?1 lying influence as the salaried and wealthy classes? ^age earners have m a much greater buy-mg influence. How is that? Most of the products that are made and sold are bought by em0ftJ*- W.eU over 50 to* fte buying of Amer-products is done by the that come out of n*v �" uth end of the county, said, cie^7 to b3ock been at home on the night the worn- t he" was seized on "the grounds of the'   The Senate, which has an was killed. j Idaho Country club after two autos Damaging Testimony 14 Sheriff Young said an investigation started the first of the year when hs resumed office, had revealed witnesses who declared they saw Peter leave the Utah hotel here with Mrs. Moormeister early on the evening of her slaying and enter her automobile. The couple also was. noticed in the car with another man during the evening and still later in the vicinity of the spot where the mangled body was found, the officer related. The identification of Peter as an occupant of the Moormeister motor car near the death scene that brought the investigation to a climax, officers said. George Edmunds, a mechanic, told the sheriff he recognized Peter as the driver of the car. test vote for many years on Blue had trailed him there. j IT modmcaton, was regarded a* -They wound gauze bandages 3lli?fd� on tW? legislationEven around my head so I couldn't see,"j'f tDe bm succeeds in both Houses, I judge I was driven 1511^Jffas-5!nfr^y c?n^ded th.a> Gov" he said. ernor Pinchot probably would eser-cfcre his power of veto. Five ether major problems are to*- [ I HOME Warren, May 3. (IP)-The body of T. W. Ostins, found Saturday night near the headquarters of Six Mile Run, in Mead township, was sent to his home at New Kensington. Ostins suffered heart attack as he was about to start the day fishing in the stream, authorities said. He was not found until 12 hours later by his companions, B. K. Burkett, Pittsburgh, and L. R. V/alters, Tiona. PUNXSUTAWNEY MAN DIES IN AUTO CRASH NEAR MT. JEWETT Thomas H. Shaughnessy, aged 42, of Punxsutawney. was killed, and Floyd Molander, 38, Mt. Jewett, sustained a fracture of his right arm and lacerations when the car in which they were riding crashed into a culvert abuttment near Mt. Jewett, on the Hazelhurst road at 4:30 Sunday morning. Mr. Shaughnessy was instantly killed. Mr. Molander, driver of the car, Is in the Bsadford hospital. Mr. Shaughnessy has been employed temporarily at Mt. Jewett. He was a barber. He is survived by three brothers, William, of Warren, James and Arthur, of Bradford; three sisters, Mrs. J&mes Row bottom, of New Castle, Mrs. George Mahoney. of Roseviile, California, and Mary Shaughnessy of Cleveland. The body was brought to the Still mortuary, here, and prepared for burial. Funeral arrangements are not completed. Will Probe Deaths of Three Believed Psittacosis Victims \ or 20 miles before we stopped." Kidnapers Friday night, he said, they called,!   we ctner major problen his wife and "told her that unless! sJare *^ CSI?ter of, ^ !e^Iatlve she furnished the money she would durin* These issues never see me in the same form as! congressional reapportionment, she last saw me" ' elec"0n        reform, coal and iron It finally was'agreed the wife was ] PJ^e the fair rate board bills and to go to a friend's home in Chicago! �� setting ?f the date for adjourn-the next day and wait for a caU. ment s�e dle � *Je Legislature. -When she finally got together the    . . f TnP Me?*m% Ca?e� $150,000 she agreed with them on a!   * Tmfietu^ 5 Uie congres- password by which she would tocw s" S^Tf JT^n ^ she was giving the money to the fenator John J McClure. Dela- right persons. ^ � C^LT has *een ca�ed "She and Jimmy Blouin, my part-! f?r 7:S^ P- m- tomorrow to consider ner, followed instructions and drove [ �e proposed amendments to" up and down a country road/* he ^e Mc�lur* MIL It is expected thit said, "finally she was signalled to | 311 �8*eemeiit ^ r*ached on the stop. She handed over the money.   I measure at that time and that when Never Saw Them Before. "The men came back and tcld : the ___________ ...______ it will be reported for final passage. Tomorrow afternoon at 4 o'clock the Pittsburgh, May 3 (^-Health officers announced plans tonight for immediate investigation of the deaths of three persons a^d the illness of five others, all apparently afflicted with psittacosis or "parrot fever.** The dead were Mrs. Anna Lindner Weigand, her father, Joseph J.        auQ A , Lindner, 61, and Mrs. Ella May Weiss, | MejroSe p3rfc Mrs, Weig'and and her father died' Thursday. They were stricken while attending a friend who became ill shortly after a pet parrot sickened and died. Mrs. Weiss died April 16, shortly after she and her husband had returned from Europe, bringing eight parrots with them. The husband likewise became ill but recovered. Others stricken were relatives and friends of Mrs. Weigand and her father. me not *> do anythin* for Uve j =^ code out of ccm- (Continued on Page Twelve) GIRL KILLED BY 'TIPSY' OWN Find Fourth Woman Murder i _ f in San Diego in Brief Time San Diego, Cat, May 4. (JPh-Another woman murder-the fourth here in recent weeks-was uncovered today when the body of Miss Hazel Bradshaw, 19-year-old telephone operator, was found in an old Indian village in Balboa, park. Police said that the girl, whose body was stabbed Jn & dozen places, apparently had been dead about 8 hours. Her wrist watch had stopped at 9:43 o'clock. Authorities said they believed she was attacked before she was killed. Following upon the strangling February 10 of Virginia Brooks, a schoolgirl, the uaclottied body ol 16- year-old Louise Teuber was found suspended by the neck from a tree near Black mountain just two weeks ago, and the next Thursday the body of Mrs. Dolly Bibbens  was found strangled in her home. None of the killings has been solved. . The Indian village in which the body of the latest victim was found is five miles from the business district. The body lay close under the abode wall which surraunds the village. Five feet away was a large pool of blood, indicating, police say, that she was  stabbed  while  standing,   and staggered several feet before she fell PEACEFUL ENGLISH VILLAGE SHOCKED Manchester, England, May 3. (JPh-The peaceful countryside of East Lancaster was shocked early today by a sharp earth tremor, which was felt over a large area. No casualties were reported but there was some property damage. At Eccles buildings were slightly damaged and a number of chimneys and flower pots were shaken down: A telephone operator at the exchange was hurled from her seat when the building shcok. People ran in alarm from their homes in Salford when the buildings were shaken and chimneys crashed down. The tremor also was felt at Old Trafford and Bolton. The incident was an unpleasant surprise to Lancashiremen who are not used to such manifestations of Mature. Warren, May 3. (JP)- -With a rifle containing one exploded shell nearby, the body of Lewis S. Dinham, 54, was found today in a shed at his ^.ome at Youngsville, near here. Authorities termed the death as suicide. Philadelphia, May 3 (JP)-An automobile whose driver was alleged to have been intoxicated, struck two girls today at Seventh and Lehigh j avenue, killing one and seriously inr * juring the other. Esther Porter, 22, was almost instantly killed. Her companion, Hannah Kreiger also 22, suffered a possible fracture of the skull. Morris Hearty, 33, driver of the car, was held without bail charged with manslaughter and driving while intoxicated. been indefinitely postponed on the election code. May Be Reported. The fair rate board bills, passed last week by the House and now in the hands of the Senate committee on Judiciary general, may be reported for passage in the Senate this week but in the event they have not been reported by Wednesday, the administra- (aApMX aSej uo panuRuoo) Public Assistance Is Asked to Find Missing York Girl DETROIT, FORMERLY OF BRADFORD, DIES T'^ "x^T^      h     � �* New York, May 3. (^P>-After a futile search of nearly two weeks, police and private detectives issued a call for public assistance tonight in their hunt for Doris Dempsey, 15 year old daughter of William W. Dempsey, jr., wealthy York, Pa., lumberman. The girl disappeared from her home in York April 22 after bidding her family goodnight and going to her .room. Later she appeared at the railroad station, bought a ticket for New York, and arrived at Pennsylvania station the next morning. Volice had been notified by officials in York tbat she was on hex wayt but they arrived at the station too late to meet here. They learned, however she had checked her bag, disappeared for. some minutes and then reclaimed it. Railroad employes reported that the girl was accompanied by a woman about 40 years old and that they stepped from the train together. The parents said she had not more than $10 when she left York. The fare to New York is $7.70.     '      < Mr. Dempsey had no foundation for ( the girl's disappearance. He said"she! trolt tordgh was popular at school and apparently contented. Her grandfather left'her considerable property tn her own right Jerome Boyle of Detroit, formerly of this city, died yesterday morning at 1:30 o'clock at his home after a brief Illness of pleural pneumonia. Mr. Boyle was taken ill with pleurisy two weeks ago. Pneumonia developed Tuesday and his condition became critical Thursday. His sisters, Misses Mary and Emma Boyle of High street j and Sister M. Benedlcta of the Villa I Marie college, Erie, were present when 1 he died. Mr. Boyle was born in this city and after attending the local schools, was graduated from Bradford High school. He moved to Detroit a. number of years ago, where he was employed as a machinist in the Ford plant. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus. Surviving are his widow, Mrs. Ruth Boyle, and four children, Clara Anne, Beraice, William, and John; and the three sisters previously mentioned The body will arrive here from r i B. R. and P. railroad. Funeral services will be' held Wednesday morning at 9 '.o'clock from the St, Bernard church. trk- i V   

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