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Blairsville Press Newspaper Archive: January 24, 1869 - Page 1

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   The Blairsville Press (Newspaper) - January 24, 1869, Blairsville, Pennsylvania                        PUBLISHED EVERY FRIDAY, Market Street. INDIANA COUNTY, I'A. IB i-C :MI -A. ItST, XCditor und Ttr AH kindd of Job Work on tho Veriest I'ossiblo Xoliec, m Ihe following rates: _____ 50 and Exoc'rs' Notices, ouch, 2 50 Notices, TriMisiout Advertising, t Jjauh subtcy.uent JTo. .Diisalutiuns and, per square, three Quarter Ooluuiu, ono Half Column, One OoU.i-ii, t per quire, 24 sheets, under i> 4? 44 under 10 tjuiics YOL. II. BLAIllSVILLE, PA., FRIDAY, JANUARY 24, 1868. NO. 4, 50 2 00 20 00 35 00 CO 00 1 75 1 25 (i 44 ovor 10 quires, 1 00 Handbills, J sheet, 30 or 2 00 i sheet, .'.8 under................. i sheet, 30 or 00 whole ahoet, 30 or 0 00 SO of each of tho above, in proportion. __ Cards and paper, >ne t> OU Local por lino, first Sc-'j subsequent, Obituary Notices exceeding ilmea, pet A PAKODY. portal in the full tide of manhood, flushed I with the health and vigor of youth. That j prison was a hell upon earlh, and nothing Once upon a midnight dreary, I wni sitting, kind chivalrous iniquity Rending from a dry, insipid volume of Hellenis- tic lore. While I nodded, viiiong hatching, suddenly there came a scratching, Dreadful, frightful, horrid scratching, scratching at tho nearest door. 'Tis some awful I muttered, scratch- ing at tho nearest door, SOCIETIES. in" their Hall, in "BUirsville, on tho First and Third MONDAY of each month, 7 1--1 o'clock, r. M. By Order of tho W.-. M.'. BLAIRSVILLE LODOJE No. 436, I- O. of O. meets in thoir Hall, every iri- at 7 o'clock. S' p. 8TRATTON, N. G. wildest terrors bourt I entrance at Jonx I. CIUPMAX, No. 12S, I. 0. of (J.T., lilairirille. I'enna.. meets crcry 7 .Vlock P. M. X. M. IJIKKMAN, C. T. CBA'S. W. S. _ "ATROBB MAKBLE WORKS, Co., IV The Miumfaeturcrs and in Foreign and nwatio Murblc, koop constantly on hand ami to ardor Furniture MonumenlH, lomb id Stonos, also Marblo Corner Vostd for j i enUr-cd our phop and andhav Inz experienced w )rkmou, wo feel confi.lunt that fan tho Uslo of nil, nt as low janS1y "TuTiTL B S S T 12 W A R T J WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER oponotl an ontire new stock of C OCK.S, WATcmBS. JKWELUV, SILVKK-PLATfcD WAKE, 40., vbieh will sell at Eastern priced. Repairing done at reasonable and warranted _________ R. J. W. HUOHES, PHACTICAI, PHYSI Surgron, Hlnirsville, Pa. utreot, 3d door bolow liverclt House. practice in Indiana and alJ-ly Will Westmoreland comities. _ ___ HAWKINS, MERCHANT TAILOR opposite Everett Hou.-o. lili.irsvi'.lc, Peniia. Ixalor in Cloths, Ac. Cloth- ing uindo to order in tljo notice snd moat reasonable terms. aplL'-ly H HMEAZ I W. iJlCKiWS 1 RAFF, SliGAK A CO., PllWcK MEK- ehuni-i. BlairsvillJ Pa. Cash purchasers ol Grain, Wool, Pork, Butler, Ac. jnnlS'67-tf________ M. U., PRACTICAL Physician aud y, Pn. Office south-west corner of Main nnd Spring 8 Tho' it may bo something more." Ah distinctly I remember, it was in the bleak December, And tho iiro was barely casting gloomy shadows on tho tloor! How ray nerves were thrilled with terror, awful picture in tho mirror, Cooks could nut dispal this terror, terror caused outside tho door, tho rare and tearful croaturo, which SDIUO men might cull a bore, never hear it more. And the whistling in the key-hole of the wind so strouglv blowing. Thrilled mo, filled me with tuc never full before, So that now to still tho boating of my repeating, 'Tis some horrid thing entreating the nearest door, Sorno dreadful thing outrcating entrance at the ncareit door, Tho' it may he something more. I5v ami by niy soul grew stronger, hesitating then no longer, Picking up my tallow candle, moved I slowly to Uut f.ic fact is I was frightened, and so awful was scratching, And so dreadful w.is tho scratching, scratching at the nearest door, That I shivered when I heard it; here I opened wide the door, Darkness) there and nothing moro. Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing, UoubliHg, thinking thoughts uo mortal ever dared to think before, Cut tho silence was unbroken, and the darkness gavo no token, Vet I wi-uld not, trembling coward, cross tho threshold of tho door. Thero I quivered, and tho silence seemed the (Irjujerv of a horo, Merely this and nothing moro. Then into tho chamber turning, my heart having quit il'3 burning, Soon again 1 heard tho scratching somewhat louder than before. said I, surely that is something iu the ball outside tho dour, 'Tis sumc horrid, frightful creature, in the hull outside the door, Let ino see then what it can be, and this mystery explore, I'.'s tho wind and nothing uioro. Again my heart began to nutter, not a word my lips would utter, I grasped my tallow candle, feeling this was not a bore. Not a thought of staying had I, not an instant stopped or stood I, But with speed of haro or swallow, struck I for my bud-room door, .Scarcely'touched a stair in passing, till I reached my bed-room door, Hopped :u d jumped and nothing more. Then into tho ward-robo peering, underneath my bed-stead fearing Awful demons from tho darkness, might bo crouching on the floi.r, Not a moment longer stood I, till I reached my hod-room door. Then with speed of zig-zag lightning, tightly locked my bed-room door, Only this and nothing more. of a Southern I slave-master could have dovised it. Even .now they who were its inmates execrate and j loathe it. NeTer can they forget its bolts and bars, its meagre faro and its foul at- mosphere, and never will their tongues fail to shriek in rongoanoe against tho men who consigned them to its gloo.ny cells. It is a debt we owe to the dead. Their memory is in the keeping of us who survived it. It is our sacred duty to see that justice does not fail them. "TUB ISIIEBITANCK OF THE UTINU." Would the nation ask us who lived through this captivity to ho merciful to these traitors, when the blood that runa through our veins courses with a slow and languid pace, thickened and tainted hy the corrup- tion their cruelly infused through its chan- nels Could it ask us to be charitable to these men when tho flesh that is left upon out bones is rolling away, polluted as it is wiih scurvy and inflicted with disease in- grafted in our systems by the foul food they gave us? Could it ask us to bo lenient to these men who invented those torments which expolled memory and all.Ihe treasured thoughts of bard years of study, and made our minds a barren waste Can wo forget our comrades whose reason lied before the altacks of these hall-devised tortures? Can we be unmindful of the spirit voices of our starved brothers, who are ever whispering in our ears the terrible narrative of their wrongs, aud whose thin and ghastly forma like grim, gaunt spectres are ever stalking before our eyoj to remind us that justice is not yet done. (TO UK CONTINUED.) Eow the Eomans Lived. If Mijthing more were wanted to give us an idea, of Roman magnificence, we would turn our eyes from public monuments, de- moralizing games and grand processions; we would forget tho statutes in brass and marble, which outnumbered theliving inhab- itants, so numerous that one hundred thous- and have been recovered and still embellish Italy, aud would descend into tho lower sphere of material those things which attest luxury and ornaments, dresses, sumptuous living and rich lurniture. Tbe art of using metals and cutting precious stores surpassed anything known al the pres- ent day. In the decoration of houses, iu so- cial entertainments, in cookery, the Romans were remarkable. The signet rings cameos, bracelets, bronzes, chains, vases, couches, banqueting tables, lamps, chariots, Twenty Months in ftcbel Prisons. A. .WILSON N 0 H B I ATTORNEY AT LAW, 2-il South Third Street, Philadelphia, Will attend to collections and logal bniiuMi In bo of Philadelphia. B OOK BINDING The undersigned has opened a book bindery la the saddler shop of Ocorge StadlmilltT, eorn.r North Clvmer and Strcuts, He U prepared to do all work iu Any worklcfl PnK.nnt.fSco, BUv.riYilla, will be promptly attended to. Y TIT o w A n D SUBTLE v informs the ot ninitnTillo nnd rl that he hai conxtn-'lv on a largo well stuck of the bent J5 E if S u MEDICINES. CHEMICALS, Stuffs, Perfumery, And Toilet Articles; Oils, "TUB LIUKY.' On tho night of the 18th of July, 1863 one hundred and eighty officers, captured at Gettysburg, entered the Libby prison. Of these, one half were to sleep beneath the Southern sod.while twenty long months filled their measure before the rest wore released. The living have a rich legacy in the memory of the dead; in the recollection of (heir valor, their pntriolism and their heroic suf- fering. Death has consecrated and en- shrined them in the hearis of the people, these sons of the nation, who for her life gave up their own, wear a crown of martyrdom low, in being so crueliy robbed of existence, hey liava become purified, adorned, per- ected. The Libby, how shockingly familliar that Varnishes, CARBON OIL, LAMPS AND SHADES. a large iwsorUnoMt (it Religious, ScientiiFc, Miscella- neous S S 31 8 8 Xionrrr, and 3 0 M Si 1 Photograph Albums, Memo Uiarict, Unokn, Ai'Oouut 1'urjK.s Fifty varieties of llitiliai, aqd llyinu PRICES REASONABLE. carufiiljy comr-u united. and Curios of Reboot llvoli-, at WWi'salu Jan. 3, word it> to tho whole country associations are connected what dreadful with it; bow many tears, have been shed for thoso incar- cerated within its sombre walls j how many have besieged Heaven for the release of a son, a brother, a lover or a father. What n record of infamy and barbarity, has been written in that one word against the people of tho South. Years, centuries of pennance and-contrition would not wipo out a stain so deep and damning as that imprin- ted on this people by the one word, Libby. It js synonym of all that is horrible, tho type of all that is inhuman and cruel. It was the vile receptacle, the place of torture of ihe emccra of the Union aimy, the rack on which they were stretched and tho screws of hunger and cold tightened and tightened until ihe chords of life snapped assunder. It was the ordeal, the furnace in which men's loyally wus tested as of old in the Inquisi- tion they proved men's religion. With each brick that deprivation that cntera here leaves hope was scratched by some prisoner over one of the doorways. Alas 1 how many in their deaths fulfilled that prophecy who crossed over that colored glasa, gildings, mirrors, uiatresses. cosmetics, perfumes, hair dyes, silk robes, potteries, all attest great elegance and beauty. The tables of thtiga root and Deliau bronze were as expensive as tbe sideboards of Span- ish walnut, so much admired iu the'great Exhibition at London. .Wood and ivory were carved as exquisitely as in Japan and China. Mirrors were made of polished sil- ver. Glass-cutters could imitate the colors of previous stones so well that the Portland vase, from the tomb of Alexander Severus. was long co'.midered as a genuine sardonix brass could be hardened so as to out stone. Tbe palace of Nero glitlered wiih gold and jewels. Perfumes and flowers were show- ered from ivory ceilings. Tho balls of Fleli- ognbulua were hung with cloth and gold, en- riched with jawels, His beds were silver and his tables of gold. Tiberius gave a million of sesterces for a picture of his A banquet dish of Daescillus weighed five hundred pounds silver. The cups of Drus- c.us weroof gold. Tunica were embroidered wiih ihe figures of various animals. San- dals were garnished wiih precious Paulina wore jewtU, when she paid visits, valued at Drinking cups were en- graved with scenes' from the poets. Libra- ries were adorned with busts and presses of rare wood. Some were inlaid with tortoise shell, and covered will) gorgeous purple. The Roman grandeei; rode in golden chariots, balhed in marble baths, d ivied from golden plate, drank from crystal cups, slept on beds of down, rsolined on luxurious couches, wore embroidered robes, and were adorned with precious stones. They ran- sacked the earth and the seas for rare dishes for their banquets, and ornamented their houses wiih carpets from Babylon, onyx jSlew York Merchant Princes The New York Commercial Advertiser of Friday says In the citj tax assessment liit for 1867 appears the names of about 000 properly owners, all tax-payers. The total tax levy for the year is 98, or an increase of 10 over the levy of 1866. At (J7, the per cent, on the which is the current rate of tax, the entire properly value of tho city would be about according to compu- sation but it is in fact, one-third more than this, or nearly the fact being that property in this city is assessed at one- third below its full valuation. Among the most opulent tax-payers are Wm. B. Astor, whose aggregate tax, exclusive of the na- tional tax, is his tax on 000 personal propeil.y is John J. Astor, Jr., ia credited-with a tax of 50, on personal property; and Wil- liam Astor pays on personal prop erty. Mr. A. T. Stewart is taxed upwards of of this sum nearly one quarter is derived from his persona! property of Corneliotis Vanderbilt pays on personal property, and besides his other real estate tax, pays about tax on his Harlem Railroad extensive city do- main. Pelor Goelot, at Broadway nnd Nine leenth street, is assessed on and pays an equal amount on- property in trust; Ro'bert Gnelet on Jonathan Thome on Christian G. Gunther on Alexander Stewart the sugar refiner, on and Eohert L. btewart on Slurgh on a like amount Robert Hoe on Bnd his relative, Peter S., on the Apple- ton's pay on D. Appleton on of it; the Harper fr-nily on 0-0, of which is possessed by James hi. Harper, by Fletcher Harper, Sr., nnd by Jno. Harper Paron Stevens, ihe hotel-keeper, is taxed on The Population of London. In London the houses number moro than and the streets, if placed in a line, would extend from Liverpool to New York, and are lighted at night by gas lamps, consuming every twenty-four hours about cubic feet of gae. Of the water supply gallons are used per day. The traveling public sustains cabs and omnibuses, besides all the other sons of vehicles which human need can require or human wit invent. Its hun- gry population devour in the course of every year quarters of wheat, bullocks, sheep, calves, 000 pigs, head of game, 000 salmon and innumerable fish of other sorts, and consume gallons ol .beer, gallons of spirits, and pipes of wine. As a consequence, doctors find employment. London, linally, supports 852 churches, which are presided over by 930 divines of greater or less note. It is also computed that ihe average exten- ,ion of London is at the rate of two miles ol finished buildings per day. The need of th> rapid construction can be estimated when it in known that the railroad improvements pro- jected, and now being constructed, will, dur- ing the present yeftri necessitate the removal dwelling houses. A majority ol. iheso are inhabited by the industrial classes. Curipjjs (Wfilifications for Office. A Mr. Brui.er, who U a candidate for the office of Clerk, in Clarke county, Ky., pub- lishe.s the following of his qualifi- cations-. u What little money and properly I had I gave it nil ta the Confederate cauae, and if I had ten times more.I would have given itjcbeerfully. At the commence- roent of the rebellion my sympathies were for the South; in 1861 I joiued the rebel home guard company tlat was raised at Winchester. I opened my storeroom at Winchester as a depot for tbe reception of clothing and othor articles for the rebel pris- ouers that were captured at Fort Donelaon and other places. I also wrote to the editor of the Clarke county Democrat, who was a prisoner at the time at Camp Morton, to know it he and his fellow soldiers of C'arke county wanted anything. He wrote me word that they wanted a suit of clothes. I immediately dispatched a box containing a suit for Hanson. Childs, Watts, Webster and Parris, out of my own goods. For this I was arrested and made to take the oath by payiug for it. And for which, after I was captured in OhiofI was put inclose confine- ment and chained for two months waiting to be tried by a court martini. A few words to the Confederate soldier: For tbe cause that you espoused I was wounded at the battle ol 'Greasy Creek, and for which I am a cripple for lile. No one knows my suffering. I I laid nine days and nights without sleeping one moment, expecting to loose my foot by amputation. In six weeks I mounted my horae and made the raid through Indiana and Ohio, riding sideways and packing my cru'ches to be with my company. I was captured and put into the Ohio Penitentiary, was slmved, and sufferredevery mortification that Yankee tyranny could think of." How to Promote Peace in a Family. 1. Remember that our will is likely to be crossed every day, so prepare for it. 2. Everybody in the house has an evil na- ture as well as ourselves, and therefore, we ought not to expect too much. 3. To learn the different temper and dis- position of each individual. 4. To look at each member of the family as one for whom we should have a care. 5. When any good happens to any one, lo rejoice at it. 6. When inclined to give an angry an- swer, to "overcome evil with 7. If from sickness, pain, or ii.lirmity we feel irratable, to keep a strict watch over ourselves. _ 8. To observe when others are Buffering, and drop a word of kindness and. sympathy suited to them. 9. To watch the little opportunities ol Miscellaneous Items. A carefully prepared the losses in the United States, during the past year, arming from fires, shows a sum total which is really enormous. It amounts to 000. Tho month i" which the losses o currcd was February, which was the least October, During the past twelve jears we have lost Truly, our richea lake to themselves wings. THK workmen, nearly one thousand, em- ployed in the railroad at Scriuitoii, Pa., were notified that a reduction of ten per cent, in their wages would be made on ihe 1st inst. The shops have recently been working on eight hour lime. The tors of tli 3 Dixon Iron Works at the sumo place, which employs about seven hundred men, gave a similar notice to their employ- ees, and will also reduce the number of workmen by discharging many of the men. The Lacknwanun Iron Company, at Scrantou, recently discharged a number of men. So far as eclipses are concerned, the peo- ple in the United States needn't trouble themselves this year about telescopes or smoked glass. There will be two eclipses of the sun in !868. On Februaiy 22.1. at 9 o'clock 29 minutes in the morning. InvisU ble in the United Stnies, visible in South America, tho Atlantic ocean and Africa. The second is a total eclipie of the sun on August 18th, at 15 o'clock 15 minutes in the morning, nut lo be seen anywhere in thcso parts. TUB rufian Martin, who shot Judge Btia- teed, belongs to a family of murderers, dif- eroiil members of which, under ihe old rulo of the chivalry, havo distinguished ihem- selves at various times by the ease and in- difference with which they could take human life. One of the females of th'e tribe, after one of ths street tragedies which ended ia the death of a man by the hand of a Martin, Innocently observed, Now I hope the peo- ple will learn to let the Martins RKV. EF.WARD BVRXIIAM, of Newburyport, supposed lo have lost, his life by the Angolii disaster, is alive. thinks he was saved by a direct interposition of Providence. He intended to lake the fatal train, but a premo- nitior, of coming disaster if he remained over at Cleveland sent him forward on an curlier train. THE free library of Boston contains 000 volumes, largely of a solid and instruct- ive character. The managers report that there has been a steady decline .in the de- mand lor theological, metaphysical and ethi- cal work, from eleven to four per cent, of the entire reading, at that institution. UxnRit the head of "u scathing a Louisville paper publishes an appeal from the Grand Jury in that city, addressed to the Legislature of Kentucky. In this document we find an appalling revelation of the iniqui- ties of Louisville. Open vice and debauch- ery are the rules young girls are inveiglad nnd lost; lotteries, gambling liquor nhopn, ond worse places are licensed gatnbs l.ng is an open trvde; murder, arson nnd robbery are of daily occurrence the apoth- ecaries sell rum lo minors: the city rullians carry concealed short, there is no end to the depravity. This indictment U cups, cups from Bythinia, marbles from NU-- midia, from Corrinth, statutes trom in short, was precious or curious in tho most distant countries. The luxuries of the bath almost exceed belief, and on the walls were magnificent frescoes and paintings, exhibiting an inexhaustible productiveness in landscapes and mytholog- ical scenes. A SI.AUGIITEIUXO press s just now engaged in glorifying a new in- vention made for.slaughtering people by the A Hint to Butchers. A correspondent of an English journal describes and recommends a new method ol slaughtering cattle for the market, which is now practiced with success by some English butchers: The obj'ict o( the new practice is to prevent the draining from the vessels of all the juices which constitute the blood, which are entirely lost in the ordinary method. This object is accomplished by the admission of air into the thorax of the mal by means of puncturing between ribs, by which process (he lungs are col- lapsed, and cannot be again inflated. Sim ultaneous with this puncturing, by means of A short, stiff knife, the butcher SOVOM the spinal marrow at the junction of the skull with the fiist joint of the operation producing instantaneous paralysis and al- most immediale death. These operations the sudden stoppage of breathing and the immediate suspenflion of the circulation of the blood, by which all ihe venous or car- borated blood is prevented from entering the lungs, and is drained off from the carcass, while the arterial blood and sanguinon.- lymph are retained." This, it is aaid, rendeis the flesh more succulent and nutritious than when il is completely drained of the fluidH named, as in'the ordinary way. It is asserted that meat so prepared sen sooner and keeps longer, besides being richer in flavor than tha? preparel in the ordinary mode. o------------- LAND OCCDVIBD BY J. Har- ris, ot the American Agriculturist, thus speaks of land lost by fences How much land does an pld fashioned fence occupy? I have always thought it took up a good deal of laud, but never had the curiosity to measure. But Ibis summer we have been building a stone wall along the whole west side of tbe farm, and after il was completed, and the old fence removed, I was surprised at the quantity of land we pleasing, aud lo put litlle annoyances out ol the way. 10. To take a cheerful view of everything of the wcatUer, and encouraging hope. ,.11. Tojipeak kindly to Ihe praise them for little things when you can. 12. In all little pleasures which tr.ay occur, to put yourself last. 13. To try for the soft answer thallurn- elh awav wr.ith." A Plucky Temperance Man. Twenty years ago a young man went to Washington with a petition to Congress from the people of old Massachusetts. While in that city he was invited to dine wiih the cjle.brated John Quincy Adams. Many great people sat at the table. The young man hud been poor, and was then only a mechanic in moderate circumstances. During dinner Mr. Adams said to him. Will you drink a glass of wine wiih me, The young man was a temperance man. Bui the eyei of tiany greater than himtelf were upon him. They were all wine-drink- and it was no small matter to decline inch a request from his venerable host. No wonder the young man was embarrassed, that he blushed "and hesitated. It was a critical moment for him. But he was true He had real manhood, and he stammered: 41 Sir, I never take wine." Nobly said, young man 1 Massachusetts heard lhat answer, and understood it. She saw in Henry Wilson a man who could be trusted, and sho made him one of her sena- lois. To-day, as for several years past, he has been known as Senator Wilson I _ God bless him I May my readers follow his ex- ample, and howeve-r and by whomsoever tempted stick to their principles. Not long a politician entered the pri- vate office of the editor of the tribune, in a great state of indignation at. some article Greely had written. H. G. was sitting at signed by Claudius Duvall, foreman, and all the members of the Grand Jurv. OXE of the coroners in New York held an inquekt on Monduy on tho body of Emma A. who died suddenly in the street on Sunduy. It appears that the deceived is a Sunday school teacher in tho BAtit Street Methodist Church, and went to the dedication of a new chapel in Tenth street, death overtaking her while returning home- The post mortem examin- ation showed that death euaued from apo- plexy of the lungs, superinduced by light la- cing. Miss Tours being ot full habil. and desirous of reducing her figure, had killed herself. A verdict in accordance was ren- dereB. TUB Charleston Mercury says: corres- pondent, writing from Aiken. in this Slate, informs us oieeting is contemplated in the town of Aiken, S. C., to appoint a com- mittee to wait on ihe widow of the late Hon. Preston S. Brooks, formerly member of Con- gress from South Carolina, to obtain fro.n her, if practicable, a celebrated gntta percbn cane, for the purpose of having a golden cap put on it. and of bending the cane as a pres- ent to ilrs. Charlns Sumner, of Massachu- setts, with the following words engraved on ihe head of it: 'Hit him again.'" AMOKO other items of interest in Commis- sioner Wells' report on ihe revenue >'s atablo showing the mpid reduction of the S.tato debts since the war. The reduction in New wholesale. We refer to Roberts' breech load- ing thirty-eight inches long in the barrel, and weighing nine pounds thirteen ounces. It can be easily kept free from rust, and taken apart in four minutes, ami put to- gether in about the same time. On trial it fired ninety-nine balls in about seven min- utes. General Pleasanton fired it fourteen times in one minute, and every ball struck the mark, with a charge of aixly grains of fine rifle powder and six hundred and sev- enty grains of lead, it went through flfieen had gained. The ground, of course, raifthl have been clougTied 'closer to the fence, but taking the case'as it actually wan, the old rail fence, with stones weeds, etc., occupied a strip of land one rod wide. A field, thirty-one rods long and thirty-one rods wide, contains about acres. If sur- rounded by such a fence, it would occupy a litlle over three-quarters of an acre of land. A farm of one hundred nnd sixty acres so enced would have twenty acres of land taken up in this worse than.useless manner. Not only is the use of tbe land lost, but it is, in m Jt Greely his desk scratching away, and though vio- lently accosted, never looked up. The irate politician roared out, Horace Greeley, I charge you with betraying tho best interests of your party. You are a secret foe to Bad icalism. You do us more harm thau jou do good. Confound if yon'd go over to the Democrats, body and soul.it would be the best thing jou could do. You slay with the Republicans, and stab them in the dark. Yon are the worst enemy Radicalism ever had in this country. I once thought you honest, though I knew you to be a fool. Now I'll swear you ate a scoundrel and an idiot." Here he paused again for breath, as he had several times before, expecting II. G. to make sonue defense, or ai least reply to the fero- cious charges. Bnt ho was disappointed. The veteran journalist remained at his desk apparently unconcerned, gtill scribbling at his editorial. The politician attempted to give vent lo another burst of indignation, but he wfts ao mad he couldn't speak, and after a splutter of epithets ho hurried to the 1____ TL _ t Vl <1 (1 11 Tf rtrt It 19 starve to death while the ohap who invents machines to hurry men out of tbo world is a public benefactor, and is rerwarded with stamps. THB friends of tho poet Bryant, will be pleased to learn that his paper, the New York Evening Post, cleared last year. Hampshire amounted to 6.35 per cetit.; in, Pennsylvania in eightsen months, 9.50 per cent.; in New York last yenr, 6 67 per sent.; in Ohio in two yi.-ars, 15 per cent.; in Ver- mont in two year.4, 15.45 percent.; in Illinois in three years, 32 per cent.; in Indiana in three years, 50 per cent.; in New Jersey in two years, 25.34 per cent. THE Cheyennu Trader having asserted lhat Cheyenne, a city of seven thousand in- habitants, was probably lha only city in the world free from rats, the Salt Lake Kcwa re- plies toat Salt Lake City is twice as large as Cheyenne, and twenty times as old, yet thero are no. rats ihere eilher. These are curious facts. Cheyenne, however, has still ihe ad- vantage of Salt Lake, since it is not only tree from rats but also from Mormons, HKSRY J. RAYMOND. Esq., of the New York times, ia a Presbyterian. Mr. Gree- ley, as is well known, is an attendant of Dr. Chapin's church. Mr. Bonner is a Congre- gationa'.Ut, and James Gordon Bennett ft Roman Catholio. William Cullen Bryant and Peter Coopur are Unitarians, the latter being a member of Dr. Bellow's Church of the Holy Zebra. VKUY sad accounts are receiver] of the famine in Finland. The peasants in that country are reduced to such extremities that they think themselves happy if they can pro- cur'j loaves com posad, in equal portions, of sawdust, moss nnd a coarse rye flour. Many have obtained permission from the Govern- door. The philosopher then lifted his head for the first lime, and called put in his high, shrill vsice, Don't go off in that way, my friend. Come back and relieve your mind P THE Allegheny Valley Railroad was form- ally opened, week, from Pittsburg lo Venaugo Oily. The excursion train, the first over the rand, consisted of twenty pas o-eut to TWBSTY-VIVH millions of dollars pay for the soldiers' monuments will not now in contemplation :md being built in the United States, Is all the solicitude1 of the Democracy, on the subject of reconstruction, cannot be concealed that their only anxiety is lhat traitors will bn punidlti-d too severely.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication