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Bedford Gazette Newspaper Archive: September 8, 1899 - Page 1

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   Bedford Gazette (Newspaper) - September 8, 1899, Bedford, Pennsylvania                               is seven THE MM SL them all. DFORD If it isn't in The Gazette It didn't happen. VOL. 95. BEDFORD, PA., FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 1899. ESTABLISHED IN 1805. Business Transacted the First Week of the SEPTEMBER SESSIONS. II. W Lee Appointed Court Crier null A. I. Nycum and Bridge Sentenced. Court convened on Monday, Septem ber 4, at 1 -.30 p. m. Present: HOD. J. H. Longenecker, president judge; Hon. Isaiah Conley and Hon. Eli Eichelber- ger, associate judges. Grand jury called; 23 answered John James was excused as a juror. A. C. "Mullin was appointed foreman of the grand jury. Henry W. Lee was appointed court crier and A. L Nycum tipstaff. The constables were called, sworn, and presented their returns. Estate of Samuel Harvey, appoint- ment of auditor continued. Estate of A. B. Zook, order of sale continued. Petition of Ross Mortiinore, minor child of James Mortiinore and legatee of Emma E. Mowry, for guardian granted and he selected his mother, Mrs. Margaret Mortimore. Bond in SOOO, to be approved by the clerk. Estate of Godfrey Mench, auditor's report filed, exceptions withdrawn. Estate of Samuel of commissioners appointed to appraise real estate confirmed and rule on heirs granted. Estate of N. C. Evans, widow's in- ventory filed and confirmed nisi. Estate of N. C Evans, petition of administrator for an order to sell reil estate to pay debts, to sell at private sale. Sale cinfirmed. The adminis- trator was authorized to sell other properties of the deceased for the pay- ment of debts. Terras cash. Bond in approved. Estate of Daniel Barnett, widow's inventory confirmed nisi. Estate of Jacob Deremer, two ap- praisements of real estate and one of personal confirmed nisi. Estate of Wm. Eckhart, bond of ad- ministrator in filed and approv- ed. Estate of Wm. Eckhart, return of sale filed and confirmed nisi. Estate of Harvey Burket, petition 01 executor for an order to mortgage reil estate granted, not to exceed Estate of Henry Kerr. rule on heirs continued, returnable to next term. Petition of Harry Deremer, over 14 years of age, for a guardian, granted and he selected George Deromer. Bond in S.'iOO. Estate of Jacob Deremer, return to writ of inquisition filed, rule waived, heirs called and properties Nos. 2 and 3 were decreed to John V. Daremer. Petition of Jonas C. Imler, executor of Samuel Dubbs, to have trustee ap- pointed for funds for Dubbs burying ground at Burnt Cabins, Pa., and leave granted to repair graveyard and put up tombstones, Mr. Kelley to ex- pend funds according to will. Bond in 8100. Estate of Daniel Snyder, widow's in- ventory confirmed nisi. Estate of Henry Wigfield, widow's inventory confirmed nisi. Petition of Wilson S. and Jennie S Guyer, minor children of Elizabeth Guyer, for appointment of guardian. John S. Guyer was selected and the court appointed him. Bond in 8200. Petition of Ada P. Weimer for a guardian granted and Bernard Fletcher was appointed. Bond in In No. 450, September term, 1899, Cuppett vs. Cuppett, petition to open judgment, etc., rule at bar returnable at argument court, Attorney Colvin appearing. Estate of Elza McElfish, widow's inventory confirmed nisi. Estate of John Decker, widow's in- ventory confirmed nisi. Estate of Barton Mearkle, return of sale confirmed nisi. Estate of Mary A. Wilson, return of sale confirmed nisi. In re-application of Samuel Werking to have his farm attached to New En- terprise school district, confirmed nisi. Estate of Emanuel Smith, petition for auditor. J. C. Russell, Esq., ap- pointed. Estate of J. W. Mench, widow's in- ventory confirmed nisi. Petition of Fannie Mench for guar- dian granted and Edward Feight ap- pointed. Bond in to be approv- ed by the clerk. Petition of Susan Mench for an order to sell real estate. Bond in Estate of Daniel Holsinger, return of sale confirmed as to parts sold and sale continued as to mansion farm. Estate of John Z. Replogle, return of sale continued until the llth iust, and confirmed nisi; unless exceptions are filed. W. N. Figard and John T. Miller were excused as jurors. Estate of Isaac Ling, order of sale continued. Assigned estate of J. S. Biddle, order of sale continued. Assigned estate of D. L. Price, return of sale confirmed nisi and that dower liens be discharged, etc. Estate of Adam and Elizabeth Shuss, report of auditor confirmed unless ex- ceptions are filed within ten days. Estate of Mary J. Shuck, petition lor a trustee for Laura Wright's share. Jacob Chamberlain appointed trustee. Bond in filed. Estate of Michael Stambaugh, re- turn to writ of partition filed. Heirs called, rule having been waived, calcu- lation filed and approved. Petition of J. B. Stambaagh, joined in by widow, that be fixed on two farms in King township unless he shall take all the real estate, recog nizance to widow and heirs acknowl edged in open court. Estate of Jesse Willis, widow's in- ventory confirmed nisi. Estate of Jesse Willis, petition of ad- ministrator for an order of sale granted Bond in Terms cash. Bond approved. Estate of Philip Cuopet, return of sale confirmed nisi aid exceptions filed. Assigned estate of William Clark, re turn of sale confirmed nisi. Estate of John I. Smith, widow's in ventory approved. Estate of Rebecca Ritchey, return to writ of partition filed and approved. Estate of William Rose, petition for commissioner to appraise real estate. Estate of Euaanuel Swartzwelder, petition for partition awarded. Estate of Emma Jane Holsinger, pe- tition for citatioa, returnable to regu- lar term. Attorney Kerr appears and waives issuing of writ, etc. Estate of John Wolf, petition of ad- ministrator for order to sell real estate granted to William A. Wolf. Bond in Estate of JamesEichelberger, return of sale confirmed and order continued as to parts unsold. Estate of J. A. Eichelberger, return of sale confirmed nisi and continued as to unsold. Bond of 0. S. Ober, tax collector of South Woodbury township, filed and approved. Estate of F. T. Crist, petition of ad- ministrator for order of sale for a por- tion of real estate, tract No 2, for pay- ment of debts. Bond in 5900. Terms cash. Estate of Josiah Tewell, widow's in- ventory confirmed nisi. Same estate, petition of heirs for commissioner to divide and value real estate. Estate of J. R. Brinham, petition for order of sale filed. The bond of John H. Rock, tax col- lector of Schellsbnrg borough, filed and approved. Petition of citizens of Union town- ship for an election house to be erected on S. C. Dibert's land and to change election place, ordered. Petition of citizens of East St. Clair township and Napier township for viewers to view a bridge site over Adams' Run. Bond to be filed. Estate of Christian O'Neal, bond of trustee approved and return of sale confirmed nisi. Estate of Godfrey Mench, exceptions to auditor's report. Estate of Daniel Carberry, petition of administrator for an order of sa'e, order to administrator, usual terms Bond in C. W. Bulger was appointed eon- s table of Woodbury borough. Estate of W. H. Bailey, heirs called and agreement to appear and elect to take. Frank Bailey takes the proper- ty at a formal bid of Petition of Jacob Hoover to be dis- charged as guardian of Maggie Hoover held over. The petition of Gertrude and J F. Livingstone, minor children of Dr. J. K. Livingstone, for the appointment of a and S. B. Stoler was appointed guardian of both of said minors. Bond in S200 Estate of Jason Hanks, petition fur the appointment of an auditor. H D Tate, Esq., appointed. Estate of Jacob Semler, petition for an auditor. E. F. Kerr, Esq., appoint- ed. Estate of Rebecca Barndollar, peti- tion for appointment of an auditor filed. Estate of Peter Deremer, motion for order of sale to be made to Henry and Julia Deremer, at Terms, one- third cash, one-third in one year and one-third in two years. Estate of Mary Wilson, exceptions to return of sale of real estate filed. Estate of William Weimer, widow's inventory filed. A. B. Hoffman was appointed tax collector of Woodbury of II. B. Lee. Estate of Gideon Trout, petition for an order of sale to sell real estate to pay debts granted. Bond in Terms cash. Petition of Jennie and Joseph Crist, minor children of J. T. Crist, to select a guardian was read and tiled and Isaac E. Whysong was selected and ap- pointed guardian. Bond in 5400. In No. 1, February sessions, 1SE19, or- der to view site for county bridge over Scrub Grass creek in Kimmell town- ship, April 17, 1S99, confirmed nisi September 6, 1899, the grand jury con- curs in the report of the viewers. In No. 3, April sessions, 1399, order to view and vacate a road in Mann township, from H. Clingerman's barn, leading from Purcell to Silver Mills, September 4, report of viewers fi'ed and confirmed nisi, and ordered to be opened in width of 33 feet unless ex- ceptions are filed. In No. 1, April sessions, 1S99, order to view a site for a bridge over Shaw- nee Cabin creek in Napier township, September 6, 1S99, read and filed and confirmed nisi. In No. 3, April sessions, 1899, order to view and vacate public road on Dry Ridge, through John P. Lehman's faim to Schellsburg, September report of viewers read and filed and confirmed nisi. Road ordered to be opened to the width of 33 feet. CUIMIXAT' LIST. Commonwealth vs. George Bowles, Benedict Ochis and Elizabeth Oak Charge, aggravated assault and ba.t- ery. Grand jury returns' not a rue bill and the prosecutrix, Ella Smith, to pay the costs. On motion of he district attorney, process awarded or the arrest of prosecutrix. Commonwealth vs. J. P. Chamb3r- ain Charge, aggravated assault aai battery. Grand jury returns not a true bill and the county to pay the costs. Commonwealth vs. Michael Grouse Charge, aggravated assault and bat' ery. Grand jury returns a true bill. Commonwealth vs. John Fluck Charge, aggravated assault and bat tery and surety of the peace Grand jury returns a true bill. Defendant pleads guilty. Commonwealth vs. Peter C. Kline Charge, forgery. Grand jury returns a true bill. D3fendant pleads guilty and sentenced to pay a fine of 81, th costs of prosecution and be imprisonec n the county jail for five months. Commonwealth vs. H. S. Wertz Charge, forgery. Grand jury return: true bill. Defendant pleads nol guilty. Jury called and sworn and re turns that it finds the defendant, H. S Wertz, guilty in manner and form a. he stands indicted. Motion for a nev trial filed. Commonwealth vs. John C. Figard Charge, selling liquor without license Grand jury returns a true bill. Commonwealth vs. Harry Layton am Lnra Layton: Charge, larceny. Th Those Who Have Gone to Their Eternal Home, NECROLOGICAL RECORD, C W, Cleaver, Dr. A M. Green, Aim. Simon Decker hoof, Mrs, W. E. MuCIellancl anil MI-H J. R Stewart Called Home. Charles W. Cleaver was born at New- port March 31, 1SG7, and was the son of Rev. John W. Cleaver, who died in Bedford in 18S4. Decedent was mar- ried to Miss Laura Kean, in Philadel- phia, in 1895. He suffered a sunstroke in Allentown about three weeks ago in which place he was working, anc was confined in the hospital at thai place until the early part of last week. j when he went to Philadelphia. OD ?riday morning he was found deai in his bed at the Harris hotel in that city. An incjuest was held, the jury finding that the cause of death was ccdema of the brain. The jody was brought to Bedford on San- day morning- and interred in the Bed- 'ord cemetery. The funeral services were held at the home of decedent's mother on South Richard street and vere conducted by Rev. E M. Stevens, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church. The pall-bearers were Rush C. zinger, Daniel S. Horn, Esq Joseph F. Biddle, Esq., and D. Cress Reilcy. ie is survived by his mother his wife and the following brothers and sisters: Mrs. W. A. Defibaugh, Miss Annie ileaver, James E. Cleaver, of Bedford, and W.F. Cleaver, of Hyndman. Dr. Andrew Martin Green. The subject of this sketch died at he home of his father, Andrew Green, n Altoona, on Thursday of last week. }r. Green was born in the Mountain City January 13, 1SC3. When a boy .e came to Bedford and lived here for everal years. lie was graduated in entistry and medicine from the Phila- elphia Dental college and the Jeiter- on Medical college. For the past ten ears he practised neither profession, aving been engaged in the real estate nd banking business at Washington, D. C. Three years ago his health egan to fail. In October, 1898, he ought relief at Los Angeles, Cal and ot being benefited, purchased a ranch n Arizona, opening and becoming erintendent of a sanitarium at Fort Huaebuca, Ariz. lie then went to 'ombstone, where his health seemed o improve for a time, but a relapse et in and he returned to Altoona, where e resided until called to his eternal ome. His mother, two wives and our children preceded him to the pirit world. Three brothers, Grant, bief yeoman, on the United States ruiser Prairie, and Sanford, chief en- ineer of the United States ship Fish- awk, and Dr. William A. Green, of Ariz., survive him. He is Iso survived by three sisters. Mrs Simon Deckerhoof. Mrs. Margaret Deckerhoof, wife of apt. Simon Deckerhoof, died at her ome in Boydstown on er 1. She was a daughter of Mr. and Irs. George Stoutnour and was ag'ed evenly years, seven months and iphteen days at the time of her death he funeral services were held at the ome of decedent Sunday afternoon at o'clock and were conducted by Rev. C. of the Presbyterian hurch. Interment was made in the eilford cemetery. Decedent is surviv- d by her husband and the following hildren Charles, of Bedford; Frank ud Harry, of Mrs. John ilchrist, of Marietta, 0. Mrs. Deek- rhoof was a member of the Presby- erian church. She was highly esteem- d by her f rieods and neighbors. Mrs. William E McClelland. Mrs. William E. McClelland died at er home in Altoona on Saturday. )ecedent's maiden name was Lydia Ilizabeth Mummah. She was a daugh- erof Cornelius and Lydia Mummah nd was born atKiddlesburg November A decade ago the family moved o Altoona and here, five years after- ward, the deceased was united in mar- iage to William E. McClelland, who, vith a daughter, Lillian, survives her, Mrs. James B. Stewart. Mrs. James R. Stewart, of Altoona, .ied on Friday, of paralysis. She was daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James jreen and was born in Bedford county une 5, 1329. After their marriage Mr. ,nd Mrs. Stewart moved to Hollidays- iurg and from, years Altoona. Her husband and is children survive her. grand jury returned a true bill; jurj called and returned that it finds th defendants not guilty and that th prosecutor, John S. Morgart, pay one third of the costs and the defendan (CONTINUED oy EOORTH PAGE.) Mack Eicholtz Injured. Mack eleven-year-old son >f George Eicholtz, of Bedford town- ,hip, met with a serious accident last Saturday afternoon, in which he suf- 'ered a wound of the inner portion of lis left thigh very near the femoral artery. This wound has all the ap- pearance of having been caused by a )ullet entering the leg. It is about ivo inches deep. Mack, in company with a number ot other boys, visited the Todd reservoir. One of the boys carried a revolver, which they all claim was not fired at any time. They all say that Mack found a dynamite cartridge at the reservoir, which he placed upon a stone and discharged by throwing another stone upon it, a piece of the cartridge striking him iu the leg. Some of the caps, loaded with nitro-glycerine, which have been put oil in the same way since the ac- cident, show that they are blown into small fragments and would likely pro- duce a lacerated wound, instead of a smooth and round one, such as Mack received. The bullet has not been ex tracted. After penetrating for two inches it turned upward and buries: itself in the deep muscles. The pa tient is able to be about the house. He sulfers no pain or inconvenience as a result of the accident. New Daily Paper for Greensbarg. A despatch from Greensburg to th Pittsburg Post says "This town is to have a new daily paper, Democratic in politics, an? owned and directed by a stock compan. composed of leading Democratic pol: ticians. Among those who are inter ested in the new enterprise are Capt John B. Keenan, John B. Head an others, of this place, and Warren Ba the Johnstown Democrat, and Dr Eggleston, of that place. The doctrin of free silver is to be advocated nnde all conditions." AULD LANG SYNE Recalled Uy Rev. Dr. F. Visit to Bedford. Last week some of our good Bedford people were rejoiced by the reappear- ance in our midst of u former pastor of one of our churches, who spent several days in the renewal of acquaint- ance." Thirty-three years ago Dr. Sample, on considerations of health, severed the very tender tie that bound him to the Bedford Presbyterian congrega- tion, and bidding them a reluctanl farewell, followed the star of empire to the great west. After long years of service in Minneapolis, Mian., he was called to an important church in New York city. Last May, in attendance upon the general assembly, which met in his old Minneapolis church, he was unanimously called to the Moderator's highest honor in t.he gift at the position he will lold un til the next assembly chooses h is successor. His Bedford friends held a very phasant informal reception in the church on Friday evening. All were charmed with the doctor's very force- :ui and pertinent words. He detailed reminiscences of his pastorate here in a most tender and helpful way, filling all hearts with new impulses for the 'uture. He especially emphasized the fact, often lost sight a church's progress depends mutually upon pastor and people. He showed the relation of the people to the church's prosperity by the following points 1st. The ne- cessity of harmony among the peo- ple themselves. There must ba respect 'or each toward each cordial agreement vith each other. 2nd. Cordial support if the pastor and sympathy with his work, thus enabling him to carry it orward more intelligently and efn- iently 3rd. He urged the thought of he people praying for their me of the first conditions of hpiritnal lower and blessing. All regretted that e could not spend a Sabbath with the hurch in whose pastorate he spent ten ery pleasant and profitable years of iis early ministerial life. The visit of uch a man is an inspiration for good o the people who are fortunate enough o have known him. The warmest wishes and heartfelt prayers of the leople of Bedford follow him as he eturns to his home and his work, arid may he be permitted frequently to re- ieat his visit. Ingard-Ly siii ger Nuptials. A pretty home wedding was solcra- .ined at the residence of the bride's Brents, Mr and Mrs. Wilson Lysing- r, East Penn evening t 7 o'clock, when Miss Hattie IS. beeaine the wife of William Ingard, son of Mr. and Mrs. John L. ng-ard, of Itainsburg. The cere- nony was witnessed by a large mim- er of the relatives and friends of the appy couple. The bride wore a beau- iful gown of white mull over white ilk and carried a bouquet of roses. 'he wedding ras played by Miss Minnie Wertz. Rev. Irvin W. Hendricks, pastor of the Reformed church, officiated. The .oiase was tastefully decorated with alms and chrysanthenmms. The bride eceived many handsome presents. Ir. and Mrs Ingard left on the rain for a visit to Pittsburg and Mc- Ceesport. Tlie bride and groom are stimable young people and are very opular. THE GAZETTE hopes their athway through life may be strewn vith robes. Scalped by a Train. The Huntingdon News says ''Levi ;uerry, of Saxton, aged about twenty- years, was found Friday night long the P. R. R. tracks a short ilis- ,auce east of the passenger station in bis place in an unconscious condition, 'ith a horrible laceration of the scalp 'rom the nature of the wound it ooks as if the man had been struck on he head by the journal box of a car in assing, the scalp being torn in the hape of a letter "S" from the left ear cross and down past the right ear to he neck, a distance of some ten nches. The man was also completely in the limbs, and there is a uestion as to his recovery. It took he company's physician, Dr. T3rum- >augh, several hours to pick the cinder ut of his scalp and sew the same into position. He was sent to his home in xton on Saturday afternoon." Recently Becorded. Lydia Lowery to Jonathan L Feicht- ner, lot in Hyndman borough; consid- ;ration William Watson to Mary C. Taylor, ract in Broad Top township; consider- ation SI 00. D. M. Baird to Nancy Carper, 2 acres Q Wocidbury township; consideration >725. Thomas L. Taylor to Rose Ann Shoe, me acre in Broad Top township; con- .ideration S200. John H Little, Jr., to Charles M. lickeard, lot in Broad Top township: conside-ation 6512. Marriage .Licenses. Isaac F. Bsegle, of Snake Spring township, and Ida E. French, of East Providence township. Ira R. Yost, of Morgan county, West Virginia, and Jennie Tittle, of Spring- field, 0. Filmore May audOHe Hixon, of Ev- erett. William C. Ingard, of Rainsburg, and Hattie B. Lysinger, of Bedford. J. Daniel Wolf, of Wolfsburg, and Arnctta V. Nelson, of Cessna. Howard McMahon, of Broad Top township, and Clara Boor, of Hopewel township. Wills Recently Filed. William L. Cash man, late of Bloom field township, bequeaths all of hi esta'e, real and personal, to his sister Annie L. Cashman. D. S, Brumbaugh is appointed executor. Peter Keagy, late of Woodbury town ship, gives to his wife all of his per sonal property. Upon her death o re marriage the estate is to be equall elided among their eight children Testator bequeaths to the Rive Brethren of Woodbury. Mrs. Ma Keagy and Jacob Keagy are named a executors. Lutheran Church Bald Hill, September 10, 10 a. m St. Mark's, Friend's cove, p. m. J, W. LllfGLE, Pastor. Comment On County, State and Na- tional Events. POLITICAL POTPOURRI. Thropp's Untnxed Fred Jf tiDRton and Admiral Dewey Are Oppog- ed to McKinley'B Policy. Careful inquiry at the commission- ers' office fails to show that the Thropp millions are taxed in Bedford county. Are they taxed at the Thropp home in Philadelphia, or are they untaxei 1 t t t The Idaho, Wyoming and North Da- kota regiments have arrived at San Francisco from Manila and their lews coincide with the opinion of all those who are in a position to know, namely, that it will take years to iubjngate or conquer the Filipinos. t t t Fighting Fred Funston's name has >een added to the long list of those who, having spent some time in the 3hilippines, are convinced that the ixpansion policy of Major McKinley is wrong. The opinion of a man like he. commander of the gallant Twen- ieth Kansas is worth something, t t t It is rumored that the Nmmtnln Edto nd Town Talk have been purchased by of Philadelphia, and will e merged into one paper and edited t long range by the "Eube" jonrnal- st, with the aid of a private wire run- ing through Thropp's mansion at 2100 Walnut street. t I- I When Thropp gets bis two county ommissioners elected he will be in a osition to have all his taxes released 'e selected one county commissioner n the southeast side of his furnace nd the other on the northwest side of is furnace, but both in sight of the urnace. He means to own the COTI- issioners' office and manage the taxes E Bedford county to suit himself. i t i- It is said that McKinley's miaion, eneral Otis, is so jealous of the other ficers in the Philippines that when- ver the intrepid Lawton or other able enerals are about to accomplish any- ling1 of importance they are quickly ecalled and assigned to other nd thus the war is lengthened, Otis lould be recalled and Miles, the com- ander of the United States o the front. t t I" How many more sprouting million- .res are looking forward to ttie day hen they will come out from their ,ty home and represent the Bedford istrict in congress? If Thropp can ay his taxes and Hw in Philadelphia nd have a summer house here and eprescnt this dislrictin congress, then young men of this county who aven't millions to back them can for- ver bury their ambitions. t t t The greatest statesmen-this country as ever produced came from the ountry districts, the sons of farmers nd laborers who by their own energy nd ability worked their way to the ighest positions in this government, things are changed now. No ope, no future for young men so long .s the Thropps with their millions can ome out from the cities and select the lief offices for themselves and parcel ut the smaller offices to those who ender them personal service. t t t Attorney-General Griggs has stated lathe will do nothing in the Carter ourt-inartial case until Carter's attor- ey, Wayne MacVeagh, returns from urope. This will be an inducement Mr. MacVeagh to see all the sights efore recrossing the ocean. And in meantime the man who defrauded he government out of will ontinue to wear his shoulder straps nd draw full pay. It is over a year ace Carter was sentenced by a mili- ary codrt to dismissal from the army nd a fine of The presi- ent has refused to make the sentence ffective by giving it his approval. I" t t Admiral Dewey's opinion of the pres- dent's policy in the is fair to assume, will carry more veight with the American people than aat of any other living man, is The Filipinos are capable of governing lemselves; they have all qualifications for t. It is a question time, but the only .vay to settle the insurrection and assure irosperity to the archipelago is to concede elf-govern merit to the inhabitants. That be a solution of many questions and satisfy all, especially tlie Filipinos, believe themselves worthy of it and re so. I have never been in favor of vlo- ence toward the Filipinos. The islands are t this momeat blockaded by a fleet and par reigns in the interior. This abnormal tate of things should cease. I should like o see autonomy first conceded and then nnexation might be talked abont. This is uy opinion I should like to see violence t once put a stop to. According to rny lew, the concession of self-government ughtto be the most just and most logical solution. The Public Schools. The Bedford public schools opened londay for the term of 1899 .and 1900 The throng of boys and girls that g-athered about the gate of the school rard early Monday morning was a very merry one, and if there were any re- rets over vacation's ending, they were not made manifest. The school rooms wakened from their slumbers to echo ;he voices and footsteps of four hun- dred boys and girls. The scene in chapel was very interesting and should lave been witnessed by many parents'. A few were there. Prof. D. C. Stunk- ard greeted the pupils for the sixth time, on the opening of the schools, as principal. E AL. Pennell, Esq., made an interesting speech, full of advice and encouragement. Directors E H. Blackburn, J. S Corle and William Brice were also in attendance. The only new member of the teachers1 corps is Prof. G. S. Miller, who takes the place of Miss Tong. The following is the enrolment by rooms No. 1, No. 3, 45; No. 3, 42; No 4, 35; No. 5, 35 No. li, 53; No. 7, 34; No. 8, 36; No. 9, 23 High School, 03; total, 424. Beware of Swindlers. Our attention has lately been callei._ to a number of cases in which the names of representative men living in this town have .been used by stranger traveling through the county to in duce citizens of the county to sub ,seribe for worthless books and otke things of little or no value. Ever good citizen should help to protect hi less informed neighbor, rather tha] lend or allow the use of his name k help swindle him. THEG.A. R, ENCAMPMENT. Cotnmnnlcatton From a Bedford County Veteran. SALTATION'AHMT BABBACKS, LANCASTER AVE. AsoHOTHSi., PHILADELPHIA, SEPTESfEEH 5. Knowing that some of your patrons in the country districts are anxious to enow something about the G. A. K encampment and the Bedford county boys that are attending, I will try and give you a brief account of what I have seen. The first persons to meet us on Saturday that we knew were L. W. Minnich and Charley Cook, late of iedford. There was no escort to meet us, as no notice was received by the escort committee. So we took tlie itreet car to this place. There are tbout fifty or more from Bedford coun- ty with us and there are some scatter- ed over the city with friends. W. H WhiseljCommander of the Everett Post, s a good hand at the head of fifty old hoys from 52 to 70 years of age. He takes well with the women and chil- dren, Sunday was spent by the boys visit- ug the parks, League Island and ther noted_places. Your correspond- ent spent Sunday forenoon hunting iol. John H. Filler, who was still at Atlantic City. The afternoon was pent at League Island navy yard, making an inspection of the battleship Columbia and the Richmond. We were not allowed to go aboard the Co- umbia but were all through the receiv- ng ship Richmond, where they receive naval recruits and apprentices and here they are taught the science of naval warfare. The young Jackies vho were not on duty were lying round resting. They were very po- ite and gave all the information we and marines asked for. On Monday your correspondent, one a crowd of twelve, visited the Veademy of Fine Arts and the Academy f Historical Science on Broad and Vinth streets, which took time, but hat we saw was really a pleasure, nd I may safely say that any one vis- ing the city will make a mistake if hey do not go to see what is to be een in those buildings. To-day (Tuesday) was the big day. t is estimated that there were between ixty and sixty-five thousand in the arade, and on the sidewalks and treets along the line of parade the rowd was estimated to he a million nd half of people. Three hundred od fifty persons were overcome by the eat.mostly fat women. Some are not ut of danger yet. In our crowd Chris- an Wagner, of Everett, is the only ersou that is sick. I met Col. James Metzger and Gen. H. Y. Arnold yestcr- ay and spent a pleasant hour or two ith them. They are looking well, ut are showing their age like the rest f the old comrades. There are many members of the old 5th regiment in the city, but you might as well try to find a needle in a aystack as to try to find them. The president was a drawing card as showii by ihe joy of the peo- le when he appeared in the parade. The proudest man in the city to-day was Professor Pearson, of Massaehu- spent three months teaching our thousand children to sing on this ccasion. These four thousand chil- ren formed a living design of the let- ers, 6-, A and K, each letter in the eystone design and of the national olors. It was the grandest thing I ver saw. The citizens of the City of Jrotherly Love are certainly a whole ouled, patriotic set of people, as the ity is in our hands and everybody is ociableand kind and not like stran- ers. The weather has been fine for our usiness. A great many will begin to eave for home to-night. I cannot ?.ay et when our party will leave, but not efore Thursday and maybe not until 'riday night, as there is a great deal o be seen yet. HOOKER "UNDER THE CAPITALJTY CHAT Letter From Our Washington Cor- respondent. OHIO POLITICS. The Snmnfton Clique-Gen. Fltzhngh Lee Gives the War Department H LUtleAIore Inf orumtlOD Tuait It Expected. 'ropertles Sold Ky Sheriff Andrew Dodaon. OE Saturday Sheriff Dodson sold the ollowing properties: Two lots in Hyndman borough, the roperty of Jacob K. Ling-enfetter, to ohn W. Madore for Twenty-seven acres of land in Na- ier township, the property of Daniel 3. Home, to Daniel J. Home for House and lot in Broad Top town- hip, the property of John W. French, o Maggie Tenley for Two hundred and thirty acres of and in East Providence township, the property of John J. Whetstone, to E. Kerr, Esq., for 3010. Fifty-five acres of land in West Prov- dence township, the property of Su- an and Abram Bussard, to William I. Steckman for 8515. House and lot in Hopewell borough, he property of John L. Drenning, to M. V. Zeth for Sixty-five acres of land in Southamp- on township, the property of H. C. O'Neal, to Frank Fletcher, for SO. House and lot in Bedford borough, ,he property of R. C. McNamara, Esq :o William L. Fyan for House and lot in South Woodbury township, the property of R. C. Mc- Namara, Esq, to William L. Fyan for 8136. Four acres of timber land in South Woodbury township, the property of R. C. McNamara, Esq., to William L Fyan for 531 Some of the sales advertised were stayed and one or two continued. A Hustler. The Berlin Record- of last week con- tained a cut of the. Mansion House at that place and in an interesting article accompanying the picture uays its owner, A. B. Falknor, a well deserved compliment, among other things, say- ing Mr. Falknor is very much of a hustler in anything he undertakes and has done Ber- lin a service by giving it a hotel moderniz- ed in its fluish, furnishings and convenien- ces. Since coming into possession of the property in June, 1897, Mr. Falknor has spent uot less than in improvements upon the building alone. If you are musically inclined A. B. is ready to second you with an accompaniment on the piano, violin or accordeon. Both Mr. and Mrs. Falknor are gifted with that spirit of obligingness and tact which plays so im- portant a part in the running of a hotel, a fact that in itself largely accounts for the popularity of the Mansion. Mr Salknor formerly lived at Hope well and at one time was a promi nent public school teacher. His Bed- ford county friends will be glad to learn of his success. Special correspondence of TaK GAZETTE. WASHINGTON, September Ee- publican claim of a walk-ever in Ohio this fall haa been a hollow pretense from the first and it has grown hollow- er every day since the Democrats nom- inated Hon. John K. McLean for gov- ernor. It will not be denied that Sir. McKinley knows Ohio politics thor- oughly. It is significant, therefore, that the first thing he did after his return to Washington was to hold a conference with several Ohio Republic- ans and that one of the results of that conference was a cablegram to Boss Hanna, telling him to hurry home from Europe, in order to talte charge of the campaign in his state. Mr. McKinley regards Mr. McLean as a strong and dangerous candidate and be knows that if Ohio goes Democratic this year it will give such a boom to the already rapidly brightening Demo- cratic prospects that the election of a Democratic president will become well- nigh a certainty. He is determined to prevent this if he can possibly do so and in addition to Banna's methods, which will be worked to the limit, the whole power of the administration will be used to help Hanna's ticket. Although Mr. McKinley only re- mained in Washington from Saturday afternoon until yesterday, when he went to Philadelphia ta attend the G. A. E. encampment, where he hopes to mt in some good political licks and in- cidentally to prevent a fight being made upon the present management of the pension bureau by the old sol- diers, he found time to see some of the capitalists who, for purely selfish reas- ons, are trying to get the government tomixitsslf up in the revolution in Sajito Domingo, by declaring a protec- torate over the most turbulent and belligerent inob of "niggers" ever vnown to exist in any portion of the world. With all his anxiety to please Jiese capitalists, it is not believed thit Mr. McKinley will dare to do what -hey wish him to do. He has troubles enough now without hunting for new ones. The Sampson clique in the navy de- partment, which has been able to keep Sampson in command of the North Atlantic squadron when other oiHcers were entitled to that honor, will have liin ordered to shore duty after the Dewey reception in New York and it will also endeavor to prevent the ar- rival of Admiral Howison. who is Sampson's senior officer, in New York, whither he is bound from the South Atlantic on the cruiser Chicago, in ;ime to participate in the Dewey cere- monies. Not satisfied with' having done so much for clique is still working to prevent Sehley from getting an important command, al- though he is clearly entitled to the sea, duty he asked for many months ago. There are three men eligible to succeed Sampson as commander of the North Atlantic Rsmey and if the efforts of the clique are successful, as now stems .ikely, Schley's name may be consider- ed out of it. Gen. Fitzhugh Lee guvi the var de- partment a little more tban it expect- ed when it asked him and other department commanders in Cuba to make reports on the condition of affairs under their jurisdiction, by adding the 'ollowiug recommendations to his re- port "That a census of the island be taken as soon as possible; that the question of suffrage be carefully con- sidered and a decision reached regnlat- .ng the same; that a modern system of jurisprudence be introduced, so that elective officers can be voted for; that a general election be ordered for a president or a chief magistrate, a vice president and a congress or legislature, ;o consist of two branches, and all other officers of a republic, as well as municipal elections; all of which can be determined, regulated and pre- scribed by a convention composed of delegates in proper propor- tion from the different provinces, which shall meet as soon after the cen- sus is taken as possible. In this way the pledged faith of the United States government to Cuba can be kept." Orders were given in the war depart- ment to suppress this some- how it got out. In view of his close personal rela- cions with Mr. McKinley, the state- ment in a report made to the war de- partment by Gen. Leonard Wood, that .he military control of Cuba will have  resent. A careful account will be iept of all moneys received and expend" ed and when the case is closed, if there >e any surplus, it will be divided pro- rata among the contributors, at which dme they will be called together and a full statement of the actions of the committees will be submitted to them. Board of Trade at Mann'g Choice A board of trade was organized at Mann's Choice August 23 for the pur advancing the interests of the n and promoting business enter- prises. There were seventeen citizens enrolled and prospects of more mem- bers in the future. The officers elect- ed were president, vice president, sec- retary, assistant secretary and treas- urer. A committee of three was ap- pointed to write up the town and pre- pare circulars giving the advantages of the town for manufacturing pur- poses. The board will meet at the Metropolitan hotel on Friday evening of each week. TEE GAZETTE congratulates the wide awake citizens of Mann's Choice on their enterprise and wishes them abundant success in their praise worthy efforts to further the interests of their town. To the Farmers of Bedford County. Whenever you find a slick, oily tongued stranger in your community selling, or trying to sell, some nev scheme or device put him down as swindler. The farmers of Bedfon county were swindled out of more than last year for which they wil never get one thousand in value re turned. MENTIONED IN BRIEF, Town Talk and Neighborhood Notes. MANY ITEMS OF INTEREST Gleaned From Folut, Plcktd Dp By porun. William Little is clerking for C D. Erode Co. The Bedford Classical academy will begin its fall term September 20. Work of the pension bureau W. K. jeerone, of Woodbury, reissue, 112. John Strailey died at the almshouae Tuesday. He was fifty old. A long distance telephone was put n the P. E. E. freight station on Tues- ay- Will Bedford have a football club his fall There is good material here or a. team. Divid Kolderbaum exhibited the De aval cream separators at the Hunt- ngdoQ fair last week. It is reported that Prof. B. W. Peck, ormcrly of Bedford, will start a new )aper at McCoouellsburg. Prof. George W. Brindle, of Lemaa' ers, has been elected principal of the Schellsburg public schools. Supervisor Tilmon Burket, of the Bedford division, is aftlicted with a arbuncle on his right hand. On Thursday afternoon of last week Irs. Dr. Henry B. Strock entertained number other friends to a picnic at tie Springs. Letters of administration on the ea- ate of William A. Ressler, late of been granted to Henry Shoemaker. A marriage license was recently ranted Cumberland to David Mil- cr, Jr., of Chapman's Ran, and Ella Bridges, of Bedford. Farmers' institutes will be held at axtoB, January 31 and February 1, 900; at Hyndman, February 2 and 3; t Mann's Choice, February 5. In Cumberland on Monday a street ar struck a horse belonging to J. C. ortx., of Centrcville. The animal't eg was broken and it had to be killed. Miss Nanna Lathrop, of Everett, has een elected one of the vice presidents f the Woman's Missionary Society of he Baptist Association of Central 'ennsylvania. The Gus Sun Rising Minstrel troupe' 'ill open the amusement season in iedford at the opera bouse Wednesday veiling, September 20. This is said 0 be one of the best companies of its ind on the road. Monday evening marked the begin- ing of the Jewish New Year 5660 and he day wa's observed by Jews throogh- ut the world. The holiday ended at unset Tuesday, evening. The thirteenth annual connn- ion of the Pennsylvania State Chria- ian Endeavor Union will be held at Washington, Pa., October 3, 4 and 5. An excellent programme has been pie- ared for the occasion. Train No. 5, due here at p. m., .nd train No. 6, due to leave Bedford .t S p. m., will be withdrawn after laturday, September 9, after which ime train No. 3 will arrive here at 9 i. m., instead of Rev. Irl Hicks, in his forecast for 
                            

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