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Bedford Gazette Newspaper Archive: August 25, 1899 - Page 1

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Publication: Bedford Gazette

Location: Bedford, Pennsylvania

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   Bedford Gazette (Newspaper) - August 25, 1899, Bedford, Pennsylvania                               TIE GAZETTE la seven BED them all. If It isn't In The Gazette It didn't happen. VOL. 95- FRIDAY, AUGUST 25, 1899. ESTABLISHED IN 1805. Those Who Have Been Called From Time to Eternity. MANY HOMES DESOLATED J. ROM McCoy. Mm. 3. S Buiuuir J, Nicholas S KuuuglMoBeph T. George I. Mowry Pawi Away. James Ross McCoy was fatally injur- ed by the cars at Pitisburg on Thurs- day of last week while acting as brake- man on the Pittsburg and Lake Erie railroad. He was taken to the West Penn hospital and his wounds attended to, but medical skill was unavailing and he died nine hours after the acci- dent happened. The remains were brought to Bedford and interred in the cemetery at this place Sunday after- noon. The funeral services, conducted by Rev. I. W. Hendricks, pastor of the Reformed church, were held at the home of decedent. Ross McCoy was a son of O. G. and Levanda McCoy and was born November 20, 1S7S, at Cen- treville. In the fall of 1831 his parents came to Bedford. Here Mr. McCoy at- tended the public schools. Some years ago the family moved to Cumberland and later, in 1895, to Elkins, W. Va., where decedent worked for some time in the freight office of the West A'ir- ginia Central Railroad company. On May 6, 1893, he joined Company I, First West Virginia infantry volunteers, and was honorably discharged February 4, Is99, at Columbus, Ga. While in camp at Kaoxville, Tenn., he was ill two months with typhoid fever. After his regiment was mustered out Mr. McCoy was in the employ of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad company for eight weeks. He was making his first "run" on the Pittsburg and Lake Erie when he met his death. He is survived by his father and mother and a brother. Dr. Walter McCoy, resident physician of the city hospital, Newark, N. J Ross McCoy was a dutiful, devoted son, a patriotic citizen and a loyal friend .Mrs. J. S Bussard. Mrs. J. S. Bussard died at her home on Pitt street Tuesday night. De- cedent was born November 15, 1S32 and was the daughter of Jesse and Rebecca Mellon, being one of ten children, all of whom are dead except Mrs. Johanna Brown, of Sedalia, Mo., who is critically ill. She was married twice, her first husband being Chris- tian Gross, of Bedford, who died on May 4, 1SS5; on the 17th of February. 1897, she was, united in matrimony to J. S. Bussard, who survives her. Mrs Bussard had seven children by her first husband, three of whom are living, namely, John II. Gross, of Allegheny, Mrs. John 1! Stewart, of Bedford, and Mrs. Charles Wolford, of Cumberland The funeral services were held at the house on Thursday afternoon at 3 o'clock and were conducted by Rev. E M. Stevens, ptstor of the Methodist A FATAL FLASH, Miss Maggie L Yont Killed By Light- ning RAJSSBUP.G, August electric storm passed over this section of the county yesterday afternoon about 2 o'clock. But little rain fell. The sun was shining in most parts of the valley, but the lightning was terrific. It struck the house of William H. James, three miles north of this place, and killed Miss Maggie L. Tout, who was working for Mrs. James. The 'wuse and outbuildings were hurne and many ol their contents of the meat, everything in the callar and on the attic and most of what was on the second floor. Miss Yont was at the east side of the house, under a wire clothes line, wash- ing a churn. One end of the clothes line was fastened to a pear tree. It appears that the lightning struck the house somewhere about the east gable; it also at the same time struck the pear tree. The stroke shattered the tree and sped along the wire to a post, which it splintered. Miss Yont was killed instantly. There were no marks on her bDdy, but her hair on one side of her head and eyebrow were sing- ed. Mr. James and John Perdew were in the yard. The latter was near Miss Yont. His team was at the gate and one of the horses was felled to the ground by the stroke. By reason of the excitement eEiused by the death of Miss Yont the fire which the lightning had started in the house was not discovered until the two sons of Mr. James, who were plowing in a field some distance away, noticed the smoke. They probably p'owed a round and a half after they heard the report whicl followed the flash before they saw the smoke. Mrs. Josiah Ott and her sons kindly opened their doors and ma.de room in their house and at their table for Mr. James and his family. The body of Vliss Yont was taken to the residence of Grant Diehl, from which it was re- moved to the home of her parents, Mr and Mrs. Jacob Yont, of Bedford town- ship. The funeral services were held on Wednesday morning at ten o'clock in the Pleasant Hill Reformed church, of which decedent was a member. Owing to the absence of the pastor, Rev. I. W. Heudrieks, pastor of the Reformed church of Bedford, officiated. .Miss Yont is survived by her father and mother and one sister, Miss Annie Yont. Decedent was nearly nineteen years old. She was an excellent yming woman and her many friends sincerely regret her untimely death. Mr. James' property was insured for S300. The loss is about IN THE JUST Sights Seen In the Beautiful Little FACTORY WILL BE STARTED, church, assisted by Rev. C C. Adams, of the Presbyterian church. Mrs. Bussard was a member of the Methodist church since childhood The body was laid to rest in the Bed- ford cemetery. Among those from a distance who attended the funeral were Jlr. and Mrs. Charles Wolford, of Cumberland, Mrs Waldo C. Wonders, of Scalp Level, and John H. Gross, of Allegheny. Nicholas S KuHsell. Nicholas Stephen Russell died sud- denly in Bedford township at the home of George Yont, where he had been living, on Sunday morning. The cause of death was heart disease. Decedent was a son of Mr. and Mrs. John Russell and was born at Claysburg seventy-six years ago. He came to Bedford county in 1832. In 1346 he was unKd in mar- riage to Miss Sarah Claar, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Claar, of Bedford township. To this union two children were born Levi and Peter. The for- mer died in 1849. The latter lives in East St. Clair township. The deceased is also survived by a brother, William, of Ohio, and a sister, Mrs. Mary Price, of Bedford township. Mrs. Russell answered the final summons on June 16, 1397. Mr. Enssell was a farmer and followed that occupation many years. The funeral services were held in Messiah Lutheran church near Bel- den on Monday afternoon. The pas- tor, Rev. E. E. Parson, officiated. De- cedent was a member of the Lutheran chuich since 1855. He was a kind neighbor and good citizen. Joseph T. Joseph T. Batzell, master mechanic of the blast furnaces of the Lorain Steel company at Lorain, 0., died in that town on Sunday. Decedent was born in Bedford county about thirty- eight years ago. His parents are dead. He was a brother of Ella and Henry Batzell, of Conemaugh Irvin, of Tatesville; Sadie, of Yellow Creek, Sue, of Everett, and Annie, of Cambria county. Mr. Batzell formerly lived in Johnstown, and while residing there he was united in marriage to Miss An- nie Lee, of Altoona, who died a short time after the wedding. The de- ceased was a member of Cambria Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons; Con- emaugh Lodge of Odd Fellows, and of the Junior Order United American Me- chanics. He was also a member of a Lodge of Pythians in Altoona. The remains were brought to Altoona and interred there. George I. Mowry. George I. Mowry, of Altoona, died on Monday evening. Decedent was a na- tive of Bedford county. He was aged fifty-five years and eight months. For the past fifteen years he resided at Millville, where he was employed as a blacksmith in the rolling mill of the Altoonu Iron company. Mr. Mowry is survived by his wife and nine children. Uedfonl industrial Company to Begin Ac- tive Operations In September. Our readers will be pleased to learn that the industrial enterprise, to which extended reference was recently made in our columns, is about to become a reality. II. D. Tate, Esq., informs us that the preliminary arrangements have been concluded, and early in September we may expect "to see the wheels go round" and to hear "the busy hum of industry." A pleasant and convenient location for the factory has been secured bv utilizing the commodious assembly room over the Dunkle laundry, from which, also, heating and power facili- ties will be furnished. No more desir- able location could have been selected. We congratulate the factory people upon their choice of a home and Mr. Dunkle upon his securing them as ten- ants. It is the expectation and desire of the Bedford Industrial company, the name under which the enterprise will be conducted, to employ at least thir- ty operators at the beginning, and gradually increase the number to fifty or more within the coming six months The labor to be performed is said to be the most desirable and pleasant of any in which female operators can en- gage, and the wages capable of being earned are correspondingly large. We are glad to know that our people will now enjoy a fair opportunity for em- ployment at congenial work and fair compensation for services rendered We take pleasure in calling especial attention to tne advertisement of the company printed in the fiist column of our fourth page, and advise our read- ers, who may desire permanent em- ployment, to give prompt attention to it and make early application. Town of Jolo, LETTER FROM DR.MADARA Bought for From Twenty-Five to Fifty Relieve the Spanish Rniuy Season. Maj. Robert C. McNamara has kind- ly permitted us to publish the follow- ing interesting letter which he recent- ly received from his friend, Dr. J. W. Madara, formerly of Bloomfield town- ship: JOLO, Joio ISLAND, June FKIEND out your geogra- phy and turn to the Philippine islands (about ia number, of all shapes and sizes) and after glancing at Luzon, of which the famous Manila is the capital, glide your finger south till you strike Borneo. What American boy that ever attended a circus has not heard the enthusiastic side-show man, DQ a box, with a lot of one dollar bills in his hand, tell all about the. "Won- derful wild man right from Borneo that can be seen just inside, for the small sum of only ten cents, and you will have plenty of time before the performance in the big show begins, Just north of Borneo are several dots on the map, if it is an up-to-date one, and one of these dots in archipelago, among the South the Sea Argument Court. Argument court convened on Satur- day, August 19, at 2 p. m. All the judges were present. Estate of Joseph Z. Replogle, de- ceased, petition of Emma A. Replogle, guardian of the minor children of said decedent, additional bond as guardian for filed and approved. In re-rule for the appointment of a sequestrator in No. term. IS'.i'J, M. T. Nigle vs Mrs. W. S. Eich- elberger, writ of sequestration allow- ed, and G. W. Richey, Esq appointed sequestrator. Bond in S400, to be ap- proved by the clerk, and writ of execu- tion stayed. In re-place of holding elections in Lincoln township, petition filed and continued until September term of court. Bond of A. B. Dennison, tax collec tor of Napier township, filed and ap- proved. Bond of James M. Harbaugh, tax collector of West St. Clair township, filed and approved. Court adjourned until Monday, Sep- tember 4, at 1.30 p. m. Iteeds Recently Recorded. John M. ?Leed to Edward Grace, 2 acres in Liberty township; considera- tion Albert Weyant to Lucinda Weyant, 2 tracts in Kimmell township; consid- eration Franklin H. Penner to Christian Penner, 30 acres in Bedford township; consideration S10. islands, of the far-away East Indiest 30 miles long and 10 miles wide (at the broadest place) is Jolo island (pro- nounced "Holo" and meaning "Sulu'') ind in a notch in the northwestern side of this island is in many respects, the most unique and beautiful little town in the there is not another like it on the face of this big it is the town of Jolo, or as -the boys have very appro- priately named it. And here I am, and might as well be in the moon, so far as any communication with the outside world is concerned. Tue town is squaie, covers about ten acres, has a wall uround it, is sur- rounded on three sides by the sea and is as level as a mill pond. The town is thing is old in this coun- try but well laid out with wide, straight .streets; a row of tropical trees on each side, fourbeauti- lul little parks, or pleasu re gardens, full of fine, fragrant flowers, gravel walks and inviting benches. The houses aie all two stories high, after the Spanish pattern, with plenty Of verandas for ease and pleasure. The -streets are of sand and gravel and as clean as a well kept door-yard, since there is not a pony, dog, cow or pig iu the towu and all the inhabit- ants go barefooted except our "boys blue." There is not a wagon or vehicle of any kind, either in the town or on the island, except one lone bi- cycle, which set all the people crazy when they first saw it, and a wagon would be a luxury outside the town, since 1 am informed there is not a road on the island The people in the town are all or and all merchants, who have their stores on the first floor and live on the second. The town has about 800 in- habitants and there is not a woman in it, except the wives of and they are Moro women, whom they bought from the natives on the island at from S25 to 850 the amount in our coin. As women they do not count at all, as the keep them penned upstairs in the the time in "true Chinese fashion." Now if you can imagine the finest looking little town in the world, with 800 "Cheenos" (men, women and chil- dren) and 700 American soldiers in it and "not a woman in you have the situation. A fair amount of grub (such as it is) but no fire wood and veiy few stores and more rum of all kinds than yon can "shake a stick at.'> All the merchandise comes from Singa- pore and as that and this are both free ports every thing is quite cheap in price, and yet all the bright, new gold (and this is the kind "Sam'' pays us) in the world would not buy love or we Think of us sweltering here in the tropics, the land of earthquakes, cy- clones and typhoons, with the mercury trying to climb out of the top of the tube night and day among a lot of peo- ple who do not know what ice is. I am attached to the 23d Infantry and we all came down from Manila on the 20th of last month to take posses- sion of this place and relieve the G9th Spanish regiment, who were glad to get away. We came doxvn from Ma- nila (500 miles north) on a big Spanish vessel and had a fine time drinking Spanish wine at every meal and look- ing at the beautiful islands, etc, but never knew where we were going till we landed. Nor did the Spaniards know we were coming. But we bad a jolly time together and "painted the town red" till the liOth flays after we the same ship Many of them had been here five years and you can know about how glad they were to get away. So here we that is all we know about worse still, all baggage was left behind at Manila We have the town Inside the wall and the sultan and his 100 or more wives and his soldiers, armed Remington rifles, spears and knives a mile long, liave all the island We only have two battalions of the 2a-d (we number 755 men) and are obliged to keep the town and wall posted with sentinels all the time and may have a fight at any moment, as shot down all around us. Bob, I have had all the war I want and have seen murdering enough to last me a life- time. Write me. Good bye J. W. MABA.BA. P. wrote last night till! heard the sentinel call out "Twelve o'clock, and all is and then turned in, as I was pretty well jaded yesterday with the work and heat. My health is Erst class and has been ever since I have been in the service and I weigh more now than I ever did, and am still not a "fat by any means. Our rainy season is on now and it rains from one to three times every day and then the sun comes out and we have "another beautiful rainbow." Our sunsets are the finest I have ever seen, and we have 'em every evening. The famous sunsets on the Mediterranean and Red seas are not in it with ours, and the sky turns more colors than you ever saw on canvas It is a grand sight It is said that there is plenty of wild game on the island, such as deer, wild hogs, etc but as we do not get outside the wall it does us no good. We have plenty of fine fishing, however, and all kinds of crabs. The water is perfectly clear and we can see thousands of fish of all kinds at any time we desire. Fruit is also very bananas, cocoanuts, etc., etc. Like most towns in this latitude, we have plenty of crows that act as general scav- engers and the island is full of mon- keys. They are quite smart and cun- ning, but great little scamps to steal. If you have not seen or read it get "Yesterday in the Philippines" and yoii will get a fair idea of this country. When at Singapore, 1 visited of Johore, and his ha- rem of 120 wives and will tell you all about it, if I ever see you again. Give my regards to Judge Longenecker, Alex. King, etc., and let me hear from you. Kindly yours, MADAKA. Nitigdra Falls September 7 and 21 and October 5 and 10 are the dates of the remaining Pennsylvania railroad popular ten-day excursions to Niagara Falls from Phil- adelphia. Baltimore and Washington and intermediate points. Excursion tickets, good for return passage on any regular tram, exclusive of limited ex- press trains within ten days, will be sold at S10 from Philadelphia, Balti- more, Washington and all points on the Delawaie division; Sjll.25 from At- lantic City, GO from Lancaster; S3.50 from Altoo aa and Harrisburg; SB 00 from Sunbu'-y and Wilkes-Barre; ?5 75 from Williamsport; and at proportion- ate rates from other points. A stop- over will be allowed at Buffalo, Ro- ches and Watltins with- in the limit returning. A special tram of Pullman parlor cars and day coaches will be run with each excursion. AD extra charge will be made for parlor car seats. An experienced tourist agent and chaperon will accompany each excursion. Tickets for a side trip to the Thousand Islands (Alexan- dria Bay) will be sold from Rochester in connection with excursions of Sep- tember 7 and 21, good to return to Ro- chester or to Canandaigua, via. Syra- cuse, within five days, at rate of Tickets for a side trip to Toronto will be sold at Niagara Falls for SI on Sep- tember 23, In connection with excur- sion of September 7 tickets will be sold to Toronto and return at reduced rates, account Toronto fair. For pamphlets giving full information and hotels, and for time of connecting trains, apply to nearest ticket agent, or address George W. Boyd, assistant general passenger agent, Broad Street station, Philadelphia. Running Current Events. OTSAM AND JETSAM Pound Foatlng In the Political Sea-Con- Kressmau Thropp'g Welcome To Coo- vert Reynolds. American Pomological Society. The twenty-sixtn. biennial session of this grand old society will be held at Horticultural Hall, Philadelphia, Sep- tember 7-8, This society, which is the only existing national organiza- tion of amateur horticulturistsin Amer- ica, has miintained an unbroken ex- istence since 1843. Sessions will be held in the morning, afternoon and evening of each day. A varied and in- teresting programme has been prepar- ed, in which leading specialists in eco- nomic entomology and plant patholo- gy, as well as in fruit culture, will par- ticipate, while some of the foremost orchardists of the country will discuss important practical topics. As the meeting occurs during the Grand Army encampment, the reduced rates of fare made by the railroads for that occasion can be utilized. Inquire of your local railroad agent for particulars. Fruit- growers of Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Maryland should make the most of the opportu- nity and attend this meeting. The biennial membership fee in the society is of which entitles the member to all the privileges of mem- bership, including reduced rates al hotels and the volume of proceedings of the Philadelphia meeting. All fruit-growers are cordially invited to be presentand join this famous society. Exhibits of promising new seedling fruits or of choice old varieties that are little known are solicited for exhibi- tion in competition for the Wilder medals, which are awarded to exhibits of special excellence at these meetings. No entrance fee is charged on exhibits. Thursday, September 7, is the last day to be assessed for this fall's elec- tion. If Joseph B. were what he ought to be the panegyric of "Hayseed" would never have been printed. See that you are assessed and that your neighbors are assessed on or be- fore Sep tember 7, to be ready to vote at the next election. Who would ever have thought of B Thropp for congress from this district if it had not been for his reputed millions? The questions with the Republican party ia this county are no longer of principle, but how can the party be used to best serve Thropp? Just at the time when there was a fair prospect of a decrease in the pen- sion appropriations along came a war vt ith now the war in the Phil- ippines, which is adding every day to the pension list. If the revenue from the untaxed mill- ions of the Thropps was turned into our county treasury for a few years our people would have soma eompan- sation for turning the office of congress- man over to Philadelphia. We should send teachers to Manila, and not soldiers, says Mr. Bryan. The MeKiuley administration responds to this sentiment by calling for ten more regiments of vc iunteers. The day of reckoning is, however, not far ofr. Dr. being a resident of the same city Boss Thropp honors with his presence and taxes, knows how badly his chief needed a coat of he applied the calso- rnine with a zeal worthy a better cause Germany owes it to the wor d to speak out and tell the name of the real offender in the Dreyfus scandal, and it is believed that she will not permit Dreylus to be sent back to Devil's Island without revealing the whole truth. The'administration will not admit it, but nevertheless the fact remains, that instead of making progress in its Bght against the insurgents, the insur- rection is gaining strength. The re- cent uprisings in unexpected quarters in Negi'os, Sulu and other outlying islands of the Philippines is clear evi- dence of this fact. Young Republicans, have you been branded like Texas steers? Do you wear under your garments the initials T." which translated means Thropp supporters? If you do not there is no place for you in the Repub- lican party of Bedford county. No offices, no recognition. The last Re- publican county convention tells this story. "The accession of Ex-Secretary Key- iiolds to the Republican ranks in Bed- ford county will be heralded with great satisfaction if it proves to have been inspired by principle and not by office.'' So says wlr. "Hayseed" in tlie Mountain .Echo last week. Thus does Mr. Thropp welcome the new convert to the Republican party through his Philadelphia "Hayseed" friend. The return of President Schurman, of the Philippine Amer- ica has been followed by some very frank comments on his part concern- ing our policy ia the Philippines, and his reported indorsement of the insur- gents as being "the equal of any other civilized people of the world" is ac- cepted by all impartial observers as "Mr. Thropp is a man who is receiv- ed everywhere in Washington with marked respect and attention by the president and the members of the cab- inet." So says Mr. Thropp of Mr. Thropp over the signature of his Phil- adelphia friend. But won't this be news to the people of Philadelphia? There must have been some bunco game worked on the president and cab- inet. HELP FOR THE STRICKEN. An Appeal for Contributions ID Aid of the Viotinu of the Terrible Hurricane. A stirring appeal has been made to the people at large by the secretary of war ior and gen- erous, in aid of the thousands of suffer- ers left homeless and in starvation by the recent disastrous hurricane which s wept over Porto Rico. Accu rate reports state that several thousand human lives were lost, hundreds of thousands of once happy homes were destroyed, crops were everywhere utterly ruined and many thousands of human beings are literally starving for want of food. Hungry, houseless, with scarcely any clothing left to cover their nakedness, the unfortunate survivors learn by telegraphic advices, threatened with the additional horrors of a plague. Crowds of women, old men and helpless little ones are encounter- ed on every hand piteously begging for food and shelter. Over ninety per cent, of the houses have been demolished and in many places the furious of the sea has swept away almost every veslige of the flourishing little towns and vil- lages. At Adjuntas, Guayaroas, Zabu- eoa, Mayaguez, Maunabo, Arroyo and other localities the loss of life has been appalling and the cries for help are pitiful and heart-rending-. In one district alone, Utuado, over two thous- and persons perished, and, as in other soathern towns, those who have escap- ed with their lives are in want Mayor Samuel H, Ashbridge and the citizens' permanent relief committee of Philadelphia have organized a citi- zens' Porto Rico relief fund and our readers are asked to "contribute to it and to send their contributions either to Hon. Samuel H. Ashbridge, mayor of Philadelphia, or to Messrs. Drexel Co., treasurers, Porto Rico relief fund, Fifth and Chestnut streets, Philadel- phia. The secretary of war has assigned the United States auxiliary cruiser "Panther" to Philadelphia, from which port she will sail loaded with the food, etc., donated by the big-hearted men, women and children of Pennsylvania, who have never failed to respond, heartily and liberally, to the appeal of the distressed. All contributions of money, however small, will be gladly received and pub- licly acknowledged. CAPITAL jy CHAT, Letter From Our Washington Cor- respondent. THEDEWEYCELEBRATION. It Will Be the Greatest Popular Demon- stration Ever Accorded To An Ameri- can Naval Officer. Public Meeting. The Patrons of Husbandry will hold a meeting iu their hall near Cessna Saturday evening at o'clock. Able speakers from abroad will be present. Everybody is cordially invited to The Elephant Iu The Philadelphia of Wednes- day contained a portrait of one of the circus candidates, Edgar R. the following special from Bedford City politicians have used many devices to catch votes, but Edgar R. Home, the Republican nominee for register and re- corder of Bedford county, recently adopted an exceedingly novel method. Robinson's circus exhibited here a short time ago and m the parade viewed by near- ly ten thousand people from every section of the county was a large elephant covered with a banner bearing: "For Register and Recorder vote for Edgar R. Home." Lutheran Church Service. Friend's Cove, Saturday, August 2C, 2.30 p. preparatory ser- vices; Sabbath, 10 a. m., Holy Com- munion andservieeat7.3Q p. m. "Bald 2.30 p. m. J. W, LINGLE, Pastor, did the Spanish We have no postoffice and catch a tramp trading ship when we can to get our mail off I have men in hospital in bed and had 84 more to line up at sick call this morn- ing, so you see I am quite busy. Diar- rhcoa is the worst disease and venerial diseases, contracted at Manila, rank next. Have not seen a paper since I came here and have no books of any kind. Had a grand trip from New York to Manila on the "Belief" and would like to tell you of Gibraltar, Port said (the wickedest city in. the Colombo and Singapore and also of my four weeks' campaign in the field with Gen- eral Lawton, from Malolos to'San Fer- nando and we saw real war and ate and slept in the trenches and had the brave boys from 1st Nebraska, 20th Kansas, 3nd Oregon and 51st Iowa "Corn Roast." On Tuesday night Hugh Barclay gave a "Corn Roast'' at the quarry on Gravel Hill. The following persons were present: Mrs. Dr. Wuth, of Pittsburg, Miss Mary Barclay, Miss Hettie Barclay, Miss Bessie Metzger, Miss Fyan, Miss Louise Fyan, Miss Kussell, Miss Hughes, Miss Wright, Miss Mann, Miss Stella Mann, Misb Jossie Barclay, Miss Virginia Tate, Miss Middleton and Miss Reynolds, of Bedford, Miss Nellie Spiegelmire, of Braddock; MissCraig.Miss Pearl Craig, of Rioiersburg; Messrs. J. S. Weller, Robert Culler, William LuU, William Jordan, Richard Hall. Joseph Barclay, Paul Reed, Charles Longtnecker, F. W. Jordan, Jr., of Bedford. After enjoy- ing a. delicious feast of roasted corn and sweet potatoes the company was entertained with delightful music ren- dered by Messrs. Reed, Jordan and Culler. For the Almshouse. Postmaster David W. Prosser has kindly permitted a basket to be placed in the postoffice, into which our citi- zens can place newspapers, magazines and books for the use of the inmates. These will be taken to the almshouse two or three times a week. All males more than 22 years of age to be entitled to vote at the next elec- tion must have been assessed at least sixty days before the election and have paid a tax at least thirty days before election. Registration is not enough, but a tax must be assessed and paid. Between the ages of 21 and 22 years assessment and payment of tax is not necessary. The voter can vote at that age without paying tax. Mr. Thropp, of Philadelphia, distils through his Philadelphia friend, "Hay- his notions as to who should seek office in the Republican party in this county. If a Democrat wants to leave his party and go with the Repub- licans for principle and not for office it is all right, but the Philadelphia boss gives notice that none need come over expecting office. For the county offices none but his supporters need apply, as was well demonstrated at the last Republican county convention. For congress, that is pre-empted by himself and to be occupied as long as the barrels from -Walnut street will give the needed influence. A few other offices, such as judge, senator and assemblymen, will b'e passed around to those who serve him faith- fally. Blackburn-Sellers Nuptials. At Altoona Wednesday evening Dr. E. C. Blackburn and Miss Anna E Sel- lers, of Altoona, were united in mar- riage. Dr. Blackburn is a son of Ex- County Commissioner Hiram Black- burn, of Fishertown. The Altoona Times says the doctor is one of the foremost of the younger physicians in that city. National Export Exposition, Philadelphia. The national export exposition, which opens at Philadelphia on September 14 and continues until November 30, will be the most interesting and important event occurring in Philadelphia since the centennial exposition of 1876 ID addition to its valuable commercial ex- hibits it will present many features of popular interest and amusement. The United States Marine band, Sousa's band, the Banda Kossa, Innes' band, Damrosch's orchestra and other cele- brated bands will furnish music alter- nately, and a Midway Plaisanee, equa1 if not superior to the famous world's- fair Midway at Chicago, and compris- ing a Chinese Chinese theatre, acrobats and customs; an Oriental vil- lage, London ghost show, Hagenbeck's wild animal show, Blarney castle and many other unique presentations, will furnish abundant and diversified amusement. Arrangements have also been made for mandolin, guitar and banjo concerts and for a grand chorus from the German singing societies. For this occasion the Pennsylvania Railroad company will sell excursion tickets from all points on its line, to Philadelphia and return, at rate of a fare and a third for the round trip plus price of admission. These tickets will be sold during the continuance of the exposition and will be good for re- turn passage until November 30. Foi specific rates and additional informa- tion apply to nearest ticket agent. Hon. Martin L. Potter. Hon Martin L Potter, of Topeka, Kan., has been for some days visiting here as the guest of Judge Longeneck- er. The two were boyhood friends and army Companions. Since 1805 Mr Potter has resided in the west and for a number of years in the Sun Flower state; this being his first return to his old eastern home since 1867. Several pursuits have engaged his attention, including farming on a large scale in Kansas, and lately he retired from ac- tive business, taking up his residence in the capital city. He also partici- pated somewhat in the politics of hib adopted state, making a creditable rec- ord as a member of its legislature. A bullet scar on the left side of his fore- head is a certificate of the part he took in the battle of Fair Oaks. After experi- encing the hospitality of AndersonvilJe and Florence he was mustered out with his regiment June 25, 1865. He expects to attend the GAR. encamp- ment in Philadelphia before returning to his western home. C.ird Party One of the most pleasing events of the season was a progressive euchre party given by Miss Metzger on Mon- day evening. The prizes were very beautiful. The guests were Mr. and Mrs. Preston Vermilion, 0.; Miss Spiegelmire, of Braddoek; Mr. William Metzger, of Chicago; Mr_, and Mrs. F. A. Melzger, Hon. and Mrs. E. S. Doty, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cessna, Mrs. J M. Reynolds, Miss Culler, Miss Pauline Culler, Miss Enssell, Blanche and Stella Mann, Miss Jessie Listie and Virginia Tate, Miss Cora McGirr, Misses and Louise Fyan, Miss Margaret Reynolds, Miss Lillian Middleton, Miss Hughes, Messrs. Alvin Little, John Weller, Ralph and Charles Longenecker, Robert Culler, William Lutz, William Jordan and Hugh Bar- clay, of Bedford. Special correspondence of THE GAZETTE. August ten sub-committees in charge of the Dewey celebration are completing rapidly the arrangements.marked out. The chair- men of the committees are now in ses- sion in thid city and it is safe to pre- dict that the Dewey celebration will probably be the greatest popular dem- onstration ever accorded to an Ameri- can naval officer. A monster parade, in which all the organized bodies and societies of the District of Columbia, military, civic and fraternal, are to participate, is one of the features. Dewey Night will find the capital in one gigantic ilood of illumination and fireworks. Senators and representatives who have drifted into Washington recently anticipate a lively session of congress. AH the talk of an extra session seems to have died away. The administra- tion hopes to end the war in the Philippines before December 1, but the chances are very much that the war will not be ended by that time and that President McKinley will undoubt- edly have to confront cf ihe gravest nature, even from within his own party. The recent outspoken in- terview of Senator Burrows, who thor- oughly deprecates the war, is but the first of many similar utterances which will be heard upon tlie fioor of con- gress. The return of Mr. Croker, of New York, from England, and his change of front from opposition to Bryan to that of a strong adherent, is a most noteworthy event. When it is consid- ered that Mr. Croker practically con- trols New York state and will control the New York delegation at the next national Democratic convention, his support of Bryan practically makes his nomination certain. Before Croker went to Europe he expressed himself against Bryan's attitude concerning the was an out-and-out expansionist. He returns to this coun- try converted to Bryan's sentiments and is now urging the Democrats of his state to adopt anti-expansion reso- lutions in every state and county con- vention to be held in the future. Mr. Croker has seen the light, and it is for- tunate for the success of the party and for the interests of Mr. Bryan that he has seen it this early in the campaign. According to high Republican au- thority, Alger never was a real candi- date for the senate and his announce- ment to that effect was made after a foil understanding with Mr. MeKiuley, solely for the purpose of preparing a reason for his resignation from the cabinet. This may or may not be true, but the announcement several days ago by Mr. Alger, that he was entirely out of polities, seems to bear out the story. There has been so much Re- publican trickery in Washington that one is never surprised to discover something new in that line. The Hanna-MeKinley crowd seem to prefer doing even the most simple things in a mysterious way. According to the above mentioned Republican authority, "The real truth is, probably, that the change finally in the war department was compelled, not so much by the bitter opposition to General Alger personally as to iie necessity confront- ing the administration of infusing new vigor into the war in the Philip- pines, which was languishing beyond the period set for its successful con- elusion." Secretary Root has had no time to consider any matter of importance since he assumed charge of the war department, except the preparations for moving the army now under orders for the Philippines. His purpose is to have these re-enforcements on the way by September 1 and to keep every transport employed until all of the regiments have been landed. When the work of transportation is com- pleted and the re-enforcements have arrived at Manila there will be ample time, it is said, to give thought to the selection of a commander at the front. Mr. Root has been said to show a preference for General Merritt, should Otis be removed from charge of the field movements. The strongest, advo cate General Otis has is his personal friend, General Corbin, who has great confidence in the present commander of our forces in the Philippines. Though Otis was a creature of Alger, it is alleged the latter would have re- moved him but for the fact that Gen- eral Corbin's influences as more potent at the White House than his and that be disturbed From a state- PERSONAL NOTES. The Dr. EcKeld'a Patients, following persons are here taking the mechanical treatment of Dr. A. Enfield for stomach trouble C. C. Dickens, of Mobile, Ala.; Mrs. Wright, of Baltimore; Mrs. H. F. Fre- voert and Mr. Philips, of New York city; Father Edward, of Pittstrarg; Miss Smith, of Philadelphia; James Nelson, of Salem, H. M. Barnes, of Fort Worth, Tex.; Miss Mortimer, of Brooklyn; Miss Johnson, of Roanoke, Va VV. H. Ash and B. Fador, of Cum- berland, Md.; L. A Conner, of Wash- ington, D. C.; B V.Eisner, of Harris- burg. All these patients report mark- ed improvement. The doctor is a very busy man these, no high officer would unless Corbin approved, ment prepared by Quartermaster-Gen- eral Ludington to Secretary Root, provisions are made for transporting soldiers, including 400 marines, the first transport to sail in a few days and the last by October 22. A second trip of the transports is provided, be- ginning with the sailing cf the Morgan City on November 8 and ending with the Indiana on January 19. Seventeen transports are available with a capac- ity of men. Two trips each would give Otis re-enforcements of men. General Miles favored the dispatch of additional cavalry forces to the Philippines, bringing the total up to but it is said that Secre- tary Boot has at present no intention to act upon the suggestions of General Miles A general circular has just been issued by the war department to all commanding officers with rules to govern the transmission of messages, military and otherwise. The circular makes clear provisions with regard to military censorship. People Who Move Hither and Thither In Tim Susy World. Mr. Amos Claar. editor of the Wind- ber Era, was in Bedford on Monday. On Tuesday Mrs. Emily Jamison went to Loretto to visit her daughter. Notary Public William Garber, of New Buena Vista, was in Bedford on Monday. Mr. William Metzger, of Chicago, is visiting his parents, Capt. and Mrs. S. S. Metzger. Miss Eliza King, of Philadelphia, is visiting at the home of her brother, Alex. King, Esq. Mr. Ralph Smith, of Scottdale, spent the past week with relatives and friends in Bedford. Mr. E. W. Everhart, city editor of the Altoona ZVUnme, is spending his vacation in Bedford. Mr. and Mrs. W. S. Lysinger paid a visit to Mrs. Lysinger's former home at Shade Gap last week. Rev. J. V. Adams, of Pleasant Gap, drove to Bedford on Sunday and is spending his vacation here. Mr. John T. Gephart has returned from Pittsburg, where he has been working on an engineer corps. Misses Margaret and Drucilla Me- Cleery are visiting their brother, Mr. Frank McCleery, of Washington, D. C. On Sunday Cyclist Augustus Bowers started on a visit to Berlin, and other towns in the western part of the state. Associate-Judge Eli Eichelberger, of Saxton, spent a few days this week at Sulphur Springs for the benefit of his health. Miss Florence White and Mr. Will Ramsey, of Pittsburg, are visiting Mr. Ramsey's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jere- miah Ramsey. Miss Nellie II. Bowers and Miss Laura E. Nycum, of Bedford, were among those who attenited camp-meet- ing at Crystal Springs on Sunday. Mrs. J. A. Lohmnn and her two little socs, Frank and Eugene, of Charleroi, are visiting Mrs. Lohman's father, Mr. Michael Ilickcy, of New Baltimore. Miss Margaret Beamer, head sales- lady in the millinery department of Gable Go's store, Altoona.spent Tues- day in Bedford with Miss Edith Oler. Mrs. J. Marbourg Keedy, of Hagers- town, Md., ib visiting her mother, Mrs. Margaret Lynch. Mrs. Keedy will shortly join her husband, who is in San Juan, Porto Rico. Mr. and Mrs. Job May, of McKees- port, are guests of Mr. May's parents, Mr. and Mrs. John May. Mr. May is manager of the Postal Telegraph com- pany's oflice in McKeesport. Mr. G. E. Whitaker, of Huntingdon, a New York and Pittsburg railroad postal in Bedford on Friday. Mr. Whitaker was formerly principal of the Mann's Choice public schools. Mr. F. A. Dye, wife and children and Miss Dye, of Pittsburg, are stopping at the Corle House. Mr Dye is manager and secretary of the Guarantee Loan and Investment Association of Pitts- burg. Miss Edith Oler and Edgar Oler, of Altoona, are visiting their old home here. Miss Oler is saleslady in the millinery department of Gable Co's store. -Mr. Oler is distributing clerk in the mail department of the P. R. R. station. Among those from Bedford who at- tended the Republican state conven- tion at Harrisburg yesterday were Senator J. S. Weller, Register and Re- corder E. R. Home, E. M. Pcnnell, Esq B. F. Madore, Esq ,and Mr. D. C. Reiley. The delegates from Bedford county were Mr. T. C. Sanderson, of Saxton, and Dr. J. G. Hanks, of Ray's Hill ___________________ News Items. The business portion of Victor, Col., was entirely destroyed by fire on Mon- day, the loss being estimated A black bear was shot by Eltner Shock, of Philadelphia, near Altoona oo. Tuesday. The animal weighed 320 pounds. Thomas B. Reed has resigned as con- gressman of the First Maine district. The resignation is to take effect Sep- tember 4. The main tent of John Robinson's circus, while exhibiting at Winchester, Va., the other night was blown down during a storm. About 50 persons were injured. Governor Stone has appointed B. F MacCarthey, of Jefferson county, economic zoologist, to succeed Dr. Fernald, who has resigned to accept a professorship at Amherst college. Frank W. Funk was arrested on Monday. He is wanted in Washing- ton on thirteen charges, among them murder, forgery, bigamy, robbery and desertion from the United States army. Huntingdon was the scene of a prob- able double murder oa Saturday night. Basil Bell, a licensed colored preacher, who has been living with a white woman named Mary Winter for several years, while in a drunken fren- zy, attacked the woman with an ax with which he knocked her down. He then kicked her in a brutal manner. Bell then called on John Rumsport, a neighbor, whom he accused of making love to Miss Winter, and cut him dan- MENTIONED IN BRIEF, Town Talk and Neighborhood Notci. _ MANY ITEMS OF INTEREST Gleaned From V.rlou rolntu Picked Dp By IU- September and oysters "E" marching on. It is expected that the new reservoir will be completed next week. Harvest Home services will be held in the Reformed church Sunday morn- ing. Work of the pension bureau: David Weaverling, of Everett, increase, 817 to S24. H. Bertram Cessna, of Rainsbnrg, is studying law with Attorney Frank E. Colvin. On Tuesday J. H. Jordan, Esq., while getting out of his carriage slipped and sprained his foot. Yesterday afternoon the commission- ers awarded contracts for painting two at Hyndmau to O. S. Gettys, of Hyndman, and one at Hope- well to T. Mervine, of Bedford. We herewith acknowledge the re- ceipt of a complimentary ticket to the ninth annual fair of the Ebensburg Agricultural society, to be held August 39, 30, 31 and September 1 at Ebens- burg. Rev. Calvin P. Wehr.of Friend's Cove, will preach next Sunday, August 27, at the Pleasant Hill church for Rer. S. C. Stover and ifi the evening will preach at the Friend's Cove church at 8 o'clock. The second quarterly conference of the Clearville charge will be held on Friday, September 1, p. m., at Pleasant Union church. Preaching in tho evening at by Presiding Elder J. B Polsgrovc. The Central Baptist association will meet ip the First Baptist church, Al- toons., August 20. This association com- prises the churches in Blair, Bedford, Huntingdon and Milutn counties. On Monday Edward Haase was ar- rested by Constable Earnest for "skip- ping his board Windber, about the 1st of April last. Ue was lodged in jail here and on Wednesday was taken to Windber.- The will of Mrs. Jacob Wentz, late of West St. Clair township, has been filed in the register's office. Testatrix bequeaths her property to her chil- dren, share and share alike. John W. Rouser is appointed executor. On Saturday Daniel Webster, colored, of Cumberland arrested and required to give bail for his appearance at court on the charge of carrying con- cealed weapons and pointing a loaded revolver at Christian Penner. A birthday party was given at the home of George A. Calhoun Wednesday evening in honor of the seventh anni- versa'y of the birth of his daughter, Regina. There were eighteen children and twenty-six adults present. Rev. S. A. Rcpass, D. D., pastor of one of the ten Lutheran churches in Allentown, will preach in the Luther- an church of Bedford Sunday, August 27, at a. m. At p. m. the sermon will be on "Judas Oa Saturday evening John Smith, of near Hewitt, was seriously injured while trying to stop the tly wheel of a saw-mill engine. He %vas hurled to the ground, the muscles of his arms being torn out and the arteries severed. There will not be any service in Trinity Reformed church, Dry Ridge, nor in Grace Reformed church, Mann's Choice, on Sunday. The pastor will be absent from home. Services at Trinity on September 3, at p. m. and at Grace at On Thursday evening of last week George Walter Niblock died at the home of his grandfather, G. H. Dauler, proprietor of the Chalybeate hotel. He was aged nine months. The body was laid to rest on Saturday in the Bedford cemetery. Ex-County Treasurer S. A. Cessna has sold his house and lot in Rains- burg to F. P. Shaffer. Mr. Cessna has been appointed special collector of the Dcering Harvester company, Chicago. He is well equipped to fill the position and will perform his duties intelligent- ly and faithfully. On Monday a demented man was arrested near the iron bridge. He had escaped from the almshouse and was wandering around town at the time of his arrest. He was put in the lock-up. It is said that the lunatic came here from Cumberland, where he is kaown as "the wild man." On Monday Mrs. Laura Evans, who has been working at Rev.Dr. L. M. Col- felt's residence, was arrested on the charge of stealing jewelry, books and other articles. She furnished bail for her appearance at court. Later, Mrs. Evans brought suit against Annie Flinn, a nurse, also employed at the home of Dr. Colfelt. Mrs. Evans ac- cused Miss Flinn of taking some money that belonged to the former. Miss Flinn was discharged because of lack of sufficient evidence. gerously with the ax. Neither of the injured persons is expected to recover. Bell is in jail. Edward Farqnhar Killed. On Wednesday J. W. Lessig received a -telegram stating that his brother- in-law, Edward Farquhar, fell from a car at Vicksburg, Miss., on Monday, and was instantly killed. Mr. Lessig has not yet received the particulars of the accident. Mr. Farquhar was a sou of James B. Farqubar, who lived in Bedford a number of years ago and was treasurer of Bedford county from 1863 to 1805. "All In Not Gold That The report that a syndicate has been formed to mine gold and silver in Bed- ford county seems to be a myth. The Johnstown Democrat says: The forming of a syndicate to mine gold in Bedford county lb claimed to be only a land booming scheme. The alleged mine is located on Tussev mountain, about sir or eight miles above Saxton, and, according to the story of a Saxton man, it has been "salted." All the machinery and every- thing connected with the mine is carefully guarded. The plant is located well up in the wild mountain land, where the timber is valueless, and the section is so stony that it is worthless for farmiug purposes. But there is an immense tract of it, the Saxton man says, and a gold mine would bo an admirable thing for pushing it to prommeuce on the land market. Progresslvw Party. A most enjoyable progressive euchre party was given by Mrs. G. I. Beatty, of the summer residence of Mrs. W. 0. Hickok on last Friday evening. The prizes were numerous and handsome. Those present were Mrs. Dr. Wuth, of Pittsburg; Mrs. Gil- bert Smith, of Baltimore; Dr. Smith, of Philadelphia; Mrs. Warrtn Everbart, of Altoona; Mrs. W. O. Hick- ok and Mr. G. L Beatty, of Harris- burg. Those from Bedford were Mrs. S. S. Metzger, Mrs. J. M. Reynolds, Mrs. S. L. Russell, Mrs. E. F. Kerr, Mrs. Judge Longenecker, Mrs. H. D. Tate, Krs. F. A. Metzger, Mrs. G. M. Anderson, Miss Mary Barclay, Hiss Watson, Miss Marie Watson, Miss Mar- garet O'Neill, Miss Cora McGirr, Mist Jessie Barclay, Mr. G. M. Anderson. Gospel Service. Gospel service at the Chalybeate Spring next Sunday evening at 8 o'clock. All welcome. Special singing. Grove Meeting. There w'll be a grove meeting in R. P. O'Neal'fc grove, Monroe township, 'Sunday, August 27, commencing at 10 a. m, and continuing all day. Cumberland Miss May Brice, of Bedford, the guest of Miss Loretta Shaw, Bed- f o -d street. Miss Mattie L. Stevens and Master Eddie Stevens will leave this after- noon for Bedford, Pa., where they will visit their cousin; Rev. E. M. Stevens, for a few weeks. iWSPAPERI   

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