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   Evening Mirror (Newspaper) - May 11, 1877, Altoona, Pennsylvania                                280. ALTOONA, PA, FRIDAY, MAY 11, 1877. TWO CENTS. DENTISTS. B. MILLER, D. D. S, I33OI Eleventh Avenue, NEXT DOORJTO BECKLEY'S DRUG STORE, (DP STAIRS.) A1.TOONA, PA, J. W. ISENBERG, Surgeon Dentist, Corner Eighth Avenue and Twelfth Street, OFFICE HOURS A. M. to P. M Satur- day's until 7 P. M. Dr. H. B. MILLER, DENTIST, Office: 1410 Eleventh Avenue, (Opposite First Lntheran Church.) PHYSICIANS M. GRAHAM, M. D., Office Hours. 'Till 9 A. M. 3 to 2F. M. 7 to 8% P. M. Except Sunday Evening. HOMOEPATHIST. No. 121412th Street, ALTOONA, PA. TT KOW, M. Physician and Surgeon. on Sereath arcane bet-ween llth attd 13th Sti ATTORNEYS. F. TEERNET, Attorney-at-Law, Io. 1128 Eleventh Avenue 48fPrompt attention given to the tltlms in Blair, Cambria, Huntingdon, Centre counties. -I- D. LEETC Attorney-at-Law. 2TISTICS OP THE PEACE AJTD COLLECTOR, Hollldayiburg, -TAMES F. MTXLMKEN, Attorney-at-Law, U3 Allegheny Street, HolUdaysburg, Pa. Prompt fcUeatlon given to the Collection of Claixni la Blair- Atdford, Cambria, Huntingdon, and HOTELS. JK. MAITLAXD, PROPRIETOR of the MAITLAND HOTEL, Tenth Avenue. Second Hotel West of K. R. Depot, Altooun, Pa. has been refitted and newly fur- nished. Sample rooms on first floor. HARRIS, PROPRIETOR Of the ST. CHARLES HOTEL, Cor. Tenth Ave. and Thirteenth Street. B.iardias by the month, week or day. Single also furnished. Open all hours of the day and night. Bar provided with the best li'l'iors and cigars.________________ MISCELLANEOUS. HALL GKOCEKY, Sixteenth St., Near Eleventh Ave. A large ftock of family groceries, as well as r.v.iTjtrv produce, canned fruits, etc. Prices to suit the times. J YOUNG BKO., Cor. 8th Ave. and 17tli St., Dealers in CHOICE BEEF, MUTTON, LAMB, VEAL. PORK, H AltS, CORNED BEEF, TONGUES, ETC. MOLLOY, J2 Practical Plumber, STEAM and GAS FITTER, 1120 Eleventh Avenue, Altoona, Pa. work warranted to give satisfaction. S. EAI5Y SON, Manufacturers of and dealers in Stoves, Tin Sheet Iron Ware. Cor. of Stli Avenue and 12th Street, ALTOOXA, PA. "Roofing and epoir.iag' a specialty.liBJL G 15. DONAHAY, Boot and Shoemaker, Eleventh Avenue, Kext door to Gnn store. F'cft Boots and Shoes made to order and -war- rtiitsd to fit. Repairing oea .ly and promptly done H. I5AIX, Wholesale ;md Retail Dealer in the Finest Brands of Segars and Tobaccos, Pipes, etc., in profusion. No. Eleventh Avenue. Trjl" IS. TIPTON, UNDERTAKER, No. 1017 Eleventh avenue, between Tenth and Eleventh staeet. Residence, corner Chestnut ave- uue and Eijjhth street. Every article pertaining to the Undertaking busi- ness promptly furnished. The only party author- ised to use the Bellford Griffith's corpse pre- server. HURD, Dealer in STATIONERY PERIODICALS. 3So. 1O19 Twelfth St. Pianos, etc., of trie hast makes, such as the celebrated Bradtenry Pisao and the Smith (American) Organ. Tne sale of wail paper one of the specialties of MUCH BRACKEN, llth Aveand llth St., (opp. P. R. Freifcbt Wholesale and retail Dealer in Com, Sliorts, Bran, Meal, Hay, UtriW anxi food for live HARRY SLEP, Proprietor. Corner Eleventh Avenue and Twelfth Street, ALTOONA, BLAIR CO., PA. STATE NEWS. pays its city officers and it is proposed to reduce the amount large number of engines and boilers for use in the oil regions are being built by the Pittsburgh Locomotive Works. three hundred men are thrown out of employment by the suspension of the Freedom, Beaver county, boat yards. Kyler, of Huntingdon county, has been arrested on a charge of infanticide. The dead child was found on a farm. business men of South Bethlehem, Northampton county, have presented James Griffin with a revolver, for killing a burglar recently. DeB. Keim will perform the du- ties of the president of the Reading railroad company during the absence of Mr. Growen. is a juror serving at present in the Allegheny county court of common pleas who has acted in that capacity an- nually aince 1SG9. Bowman, a well-to-do farmer, of Cumberland county, committed suicide on Saturday by hanging himself. Mr. Bowman was sixty-six years old. suit involving about which t Peysert, late postmaster at Bethle- hem, instituted against the Oovernment some years ago, has terminated in the low- er tribunal in favor of Mr. Peysert. The Government has carried up the case. miller iu Lebanon county says he cannot get enough wheat to keep his mill running. He reports that this is owing to the farmers keeping their wheat with the expectation of getting higher prices in view of the dwmand created by war in Europe. are said to be many distressing cases of small pox in Allegheny City. A family consisting of a father, mother and three children, all of whom have the dis- ease, is attended by a nurse who is paid by the neighbors, who also provide the family with food. Supreme riourt reversed on Mon- day last the sentence of death pronounced against Blasius Pistorious, a Catholic priest. Mr. Stephen S. Reinak, of counsel for plain- tiff in error, as attorney of the Imperial German Government, was present when the opinion was delivered. Supreme Court, in session at Har- decided the cases of a number of Mollie Maguires, sentenced to be hanged for murder. In the cases of James Carroll, James Boyle, Hugh McGehan and James Riarty, of Schuylkill county, the judg- ments were affirmed. The cases of Alexan- der Campbell, of Carbon county, and Thomas Curley, of Montgomery county were al'o affirmed. A. P. Wilson, a Lutheran min- ister, serving congregations near New Stanton, Westmoreland county, has re- cently taken his departure for some other field of operations, leaving behind him a wife, two children, and creditors whom he has fleeced to the amount of to 000. His plan was to collect money to pur- chase organs for the churches he served, buy organs for other parties, borrow all the money he could, and pay nothing that he could help. About the middle of March last he opened a small store in New Stan- ton for the benefit of his parisboners, bought the goods on time, sold what he could for cash, and thus also provided himself means for his future comfort. TELEGRAPHIC. 3STEWS FROM THE FROST. Turkish Fffacts of Malaria. Abandoning the Seige. CONSTANTINOPLE, May Journal reports that the Russians before Kars and Ardananjhave retreated toward the frontier. A Rising in Caucasus. MANCHESTER, May 11. The Guardian says The news of the rising of a tribe in Caucasus is important, and seems to indi- cate serious trouble for the Russians, "be- cause the clans which have risen are in the immediate neighborhood of the highroad from Tiflis to Vladi Kavks, which is the only means of communication between Russia and Trans-Caucasia. Unable to Cross the Danube. CONSTANTINOPLE, May Russians attempted to cross the Danube at Reni. but the Turkish artillery prevented them. Defense works are to be constructed around Constantinople. Disease in the Turkish Banks. MANCHESTER, May Guardian's Ragusa dispatch says the delay in the Turk- ish attack on the Montenegrin positions is explained by the great want of supplies and the ravages of typhus, scurry and other diseases. The Turks try to conceal this, but there is good authority for stating that three thousand troops are sick in Mos- tar alone. Some epidemics rage in the camp at Scutari. The Czar Alarmed. The Czar is said to be alarmed at the formation of a Polish legion at Constanti- nople, and has ordered the Governor Gen- eral at Warsaw to exercise the greatest vigilance to prevent Russian Poles joining the legion. All mitigations of the state of siege in Poland enforced since the insurrec- tion of 1873 will be revoked. Berlin papers announce that leading Polish politicians, at a secret meeting at Leinberg, resolved on the establishment of recruiting bureaux all over Poland, with the hope of raising an army of Six thousand have left already for Turkey. The Nation Committee has appointed Count Razinski as a delegate to Constantinople. Strikers Rampant. CLEVELAND, 0., May 11. Yesterday morning a sharp encounter took place be- tween the striking coopers and the police. About six hundred strikers, accompanied by about two hundred of their women, as- sembled at the different entrances to the cooper shops of the Standard Oil Company to prevent the men from going to work. The Chief of Police ordered them to dis- perse, and upon their refusal to do so or- dered his men to disperse the mob by force, which was done. A number of the strik- ers were severely injured. The officials of the Standard Oil Company regard this as tliH last attempt of the strikers to prevent the men from going to work, and it is be- lieved that by the end of this week all those who can get back will resume work, as large numbers are only prevented from so doing through fear of personal injury. William P. Wallace, the Sheriff of Ham- ilton county, Ohio, sind Daniel McCarthy, turnkey of the Hamilton county jail, were convicted in the U. S. Court at Cincinnati, yesterday, of aiding Federal prisoners to escape from jail. The prisoners were ar- rested by the United States authorities for illegal voting last fall, and as their convic- tion would aftect the election of certain can- didates they were allowed to go free. The wholesale oil store of W. E. Dun- ham, in New Bedford, Mass., blew up Wed- nesday, at half-past 12 o'clock. The build- ing and an adjoining one, occupied by sev- eral firms, were completely demolished. The losses are large. The cause of the ex- plosion is unknown. A fire in Reedsburg, on Tuesday, destroyed seven stores, causing a loss of The transfer freight depot of the Atlantic and Great Western railroad, at Leavittsburg, Ohio, were burned Wednes- day, with fourteen cars. Loss, _-_.. For Sale. A fine country residence, j with choice surroundings, etc. This ire- j quently means that the occupant wishes to j regain health because a residence in a-' malarial district will induce blood poison- ing, and hence disease. This can be most expeditiously counteracted by the prompt administration of Dr. Bull's Blood "Get the "The best is the is an old and true maxim. The best articles for those needing spectacles or aids to sight is the "Diamond Spectacles." Every pair is stamped with the diamond trade mark. For sale in Altoona by J. W. __ ____ Cannot be Beat. Wood's hot-water proof table cutlery. Boiling water never effects the cutlery in the least. It is al- ays the same and lasts for years. Call and examine at Fries 1313 Elev- enth avenue.'- _ _ With You Once More. Watches, c'.ocks, jewelry, etc., repaired neatly and promptly at F. C. Kramer Son's jewelry store, 1125 Eleventh Come and See the latest arrival at Ike the The Mine Disaster. POTTSviLLE, May last of the victims of the Wadesville disaster, Benja- min Mesely, was found at midnight in a breast about one hundred yards from where the miners had been searching. His body was neither burned nor scarred, and it is supposed he was smothered by choke damp. Jam erf Leddy, one of the men reported dead yesterday, is still alive, though his recovery is doubtful. All the rest of the wounded men will probably recover. Work has been suspended at the mines for a week. The report that the ventilation was insufficient is denied by the mine tosses in charge, who state that the usual morning inspection was made before the men en- tered the shaft, and everything found to be in proper condition. Nothing Like Knowing What You Are Expected to Do. NEW YORK, May 11. The Senate "Woodin Committee" have made a report concurred in by every member, and adopted unanimously by the Senate, stating that they were unable to fiad anything to sub- stantiate the testimony of Wcc. M. Tweed, which was only remarkable in Tweed's re- fusal to answer questions, but neither his testimony, nor refusal to answer questions impressed the committee with the convic- tion that he was able to furnish any evi- dence to establish the charges against Sena- tor Woodin, and the charges are pro- nounced entirely without foundation. "Wine, Women and Horses. NASHUA, N. H., May R. Collins, clerk of the Nashua Iron and Steel Company, defaulter of to has fled. Fast horses and high living were the cause. Base Ball. .LOUISVILLE, May 10. Cincinnati 19, Louisville 11, ST. Louis, May Louis Browns 6, Bostons 5. CHICAGO, May 14, Chicago 10.' GTJELPH, ONT., May of Pittsburgh, 2, Maple Leafs 3. The Confederate Dead. CHATTANOOGA, Tenn., May ex- ercises of laying the corner stone of the mdnument dedicated to the confederate dead took place to-day. The Masonic fra- ternity and a detachment of United States troops participated. People from all parts of the Union joined in decorating the con- lederate graves, amidst the utmost harmony and good feeling. Weighing the Mails. WASHINGTON, May postoffice de- partment has issued orders for weighing the mails during a period of thirty consec- utive working days on all railroads in what is known as the first contract section, which embraces all of New England and the States of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia and West Virginia, with a view of fixing the rate of pay for the four years' contract term com- mencing July 1. The Senate Gives It Up. COLUMHIA, May State Senate has decided to go into election for Chief Justice on Tuesday, the 15th inst. The House being Democratic will concur and settle a matter over which both. Houses have been fighting since the opening of the session. The Senate also passed a resolu- tion authorizing and requesting the Gover- nor to invoke the ctemency of Mr. Hayes in behalf of the prisoners now held to answer charges of riot and murder in the late po- litical struggle. An Insurance President Jumps His Bail. NEWARK, N. J., May Noyes, indicted for conspiracy in connec- tion with the New Jersey Mutual Life In- serance Company, failed to answer yester- day when his case was called. His counsel asked for a postponement, saying Noyes was in New York, fearing arrest and im- prisonment here on other charges before he could get bail. He would appear next week, prepared to meet all the charges. The Judge declared such proceedings in contempt, refused the application, and de- clared the bail forfeited. Schooner Capsized and Thirteen of" the Crew Drowned. HALIFAX, May 10. The schooner Cod- seeker, Halifax, for Barrington, capsized last night off Sable. The captain and two men were landed in ft dory at Barrington. The rest of the crew, thirteen iu number, drowned. Buy your clothing at the Young Our new goods arrived this They are of the Tery latest designs and cheapest in AUoona. We mean jnst what we advertise, at the Yotmg America cloth- ing Writtng Without great ad- vantages resulting from the use of the Mar- vellous pen are as follows It is always ready for use it does not oxidize nor smear it does not require wiping it is always new, without any care, and it is adapted to any kind of holder. The ink which it generates in a moment, is very limpid, dries rapidly, and remains fixed and unalterable on the paper. It possesses the great advantage of giving a perfect opy in the press. The chemical prepara- tions of the ink are so highly concentrated that one pen will last for several months. To the traveler they will he found -indis- pensable, as no inkstand is required which sometimes leaks and does great damage. H. Fettinger, sole agent for Altoona and Blair G-rflfed concert will be held in the Eighth Avenue M. K. church, for the benefit of the Sunday School on Saturday evening, May 12. A programme of choice j music will be presented, by a select class of home talent, under the directions of Mr. j E. J. Weston. The anthems, duetts, etc., will be of the finest kind. Tickets 25 cents, to be obtained at Hurd's book store and Seller's drug store. temperance prayer I meeting held last evening in theR. M. C. A. rooro was quite well attended and very in- i teresting. The excitement is dying away, in this city, as well as throughout the j State, but the movement did a great deal of good, and many persons can thank the j "Murphy moyement" for their salvation from king alcohol. Spring and Summer. Hoes, rakes, spades, shovels and seeds, can be had in abundance, and at extraordinary low prices. Also, tinware of every descrip- tion on hand and made to order, at Fries 1313 Eleventh variety of confection- ary, chinaware and notions in the city at A. F. Orr's, Ninth street. Sign of the big ele- Lower Than goods of all kinds, silks of various colors, trimmings, notions and muslins of all kinds at Mur- You Can rerj- latest styles just at Ike halter.' Save your clothing at the Young War Declared on high prices. Go and get one of those suits, worth at the Young America clothing Iron Stone China Tea pieces at H. J. Cornman Co.'s. Also a full line of silver "plated goods, table cut- lery, britannia spoons, looking glasses, There Is no Doubt About Mur- ray's you will find the largest assortment of carpets and oilcloths and the cheapest in the We Come clocks and jewelry at greatly reduced prices at F. C. Kramer Soa's jewelry store, 1125 Eleventh avenue, Ahead largest assortment of watches, clocks and jewelry, in the city, will be found at Rudisill Co., 1310 Elev- enth avenue, at such prices that will as- tonish Just large lot of fine fur and wool hats direct from the factories which I will sell cheaper than- any other house in Altoona, at Ike's, the hatter, corner Eleyenth avenue and Eleventh Call first instalment of new crops of oranges and bananas; a lot of chocolate cream cocoa bricks, to put in your hat before going home to meet your wife and children at night. Horrell, con- fectioner, No. 1115i Eleventh avenue. OPENING OF M. WOLF'S AND MERCHANT on Tuesday evening, 8th inst., at G o'clock, in Odcmvalder's New (HI ELEVENTH AYE., [Between Hloro and Boot and Shoe Flrnt sold at very low prices. A FIRST CLASS SELECTION I. A. WAYNE, Formerly of No. 1324 Eleventh Avenae, have removed to 11 St., Room formerly occupied by R. L. Gamble in Olmes Sink's new building, will be opeaon the 19th or 20th, with a large atoclc of Dry 6-oods, Notions and FANCY GOODS, Which he will be able to sell 23 per cent, cheaper than ap.j other honse In the City. Give them a call. J. A. WAYXE, 1329, Cor. Elevenoh Avemue and Fourteenth St., ALTOONA, PA. Mountain City BOOT SHOE STORE, 1117 Eleventh Avenue Altoona Findley Swoope. Prop'rs. Take pleasure in calling attention of those la need of B OOTS, O SIIOEO Gaiters, Slippers, and indeed everything el.ie in tiit-ir line of to their Spring Stock, now in store. Wn n.n> to wull tb K'oodp at the lowest CALL AND SEE US before making your purchases. No charge made for the exhibition of and no offence taken in cane yon fail to buy. (L HAOSER MOW, Wholesalw and retail dealers in Flour, Feed, Grain, Seed, ELEVENTH AVENUE, [Near tin? aviug 
                            

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