Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Evening Mirror Newspaper Archive: March 9, 1877 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Evening Mirror

Location: Altoona, Pennsylvania

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Evening Mirror (Newspaper) - March 9, 1877, Altoona, Pennsylvania                                V__x VOL. 228.. ALTOONA, PA, FRIDAY, MAKCH 9, 1877. FeoM3ylvaaia Central .Railroad. DECEMBER 10, 1876. LKAyB EASTWARD. s.o> tit S.'24 W.M! 6.02 IMV J W 1.00 0.26 M.K 6.50 Newport Millerstown... Thompsdnt'n Port Koytl. Mifflin Lewlttown.... Granville McVeytown... Maiumialc, TS. Hamilton. Mount Union. Huntingdon Spruce Creek.. Tyrone. Tipton. KittRnntnf.Pt Gallitztn...... C reason....... Lilly's........ Scoman....... WUmorc...... South Fork.... Mineral Pt.... Conemannn... Johnstown.... Pittsburgh.... 10.02 9.15 8.51 8.27 8.00 6.60 6.38 6.16 5.09 4.42 8.15 1.45 7.59, l.t? T.'SOj 7.42 IJ02' 6.M1SL22 6.4'4l299 8.8011.57 0.0511.32 5.28J10.55 5.0010154 fi.0210.26 4-47J10.10 4.4310.05 4.33 9.56 4.25 9.49 4.15 9.37 3.57 3.50 8.45 3.32 3.26 3.17 3.12 3.08 2.50 2.12 1.49 1.38 1.28 1.04 112.49 9.20 .9.13 9.08 8.55 8.50 8.41 837 8.34 8.16 752 7.29 7.18 7.08- 6.58 640 6.33 6.25 6.10 6.00 4.1712.25 4.0912.171 P.'M.I 1.10i 7.35 A. M. P. M. A. M, on the above table etop only tt sta- whne figures are given. Altoona Accommodation Westward leaves m., Kittanning Point 8.68, Gal. tttxlft fLflf CresBon 9.31, Lllly'n 9.41, Sonmttn 9.61, Wnpnra 10.03, South Fork 10.15, Mineral Point 1AM, at Conemangb. at 10.33 a m., MtHMMTU 1040.. Cfndftfia.tl EzpreeB" Westward leares f lit jfcW.p. 12.56 a. m. Altooha arrlvM in Pltttbirirh at 8.30 FwitliM .Westward Philadttlphia at 11.30 p. m., 5.17 p. m.f Tyrone 6.06, p. m., Altoona T.4S fk M., arrlre in .80 p. m. IHj Bastwar 1 leaves Fittsbargh at 8.45 Altooua, 1S.25 Harrirbnrg 4.15 p.m., ftal In Philadelphia at 7.20 p. m. Exprpsn Eastward leaves Pltts- 4.50 p. m.. Johnstown 7.61 p. m., Cmie- p. m.. Mineral Point 8.11 n. m., Wil- f.W-p.-Tn., Lilly's 8.46 p. TO.. 8.54 9.04 p. m., Altoona 10.00 p. m., 0.17 p. m., Tyrone 10.38 p. m., Bprace p. m., ttnntingdoii 11.16 -p. Lewis- UAH m.. Mifflin a. m., Hnrtirbarf a arriTei la Philadelphia at 7.00 a. m. VaatLHw Eastward leaves Pittsburgh at 8 40 f. AlWflnn 12 10 a. to., Harrttburg 4.10 a. m., m. Ptcffe Express Eastward lemves Pittsbnrvh at m., .Tohnntown a. tn., Altoona 7.50 a. 8.19 a. m.. Huntingdon 8 56 a. m., Lew- R. tn., Mifflin a.- m., Hujrtnbnrg andnrrivofiin Philadelphia at 3.45 p. Tmtas on tlie HollldaTsbnr? and Morrlnoti's Cove Bctadi. and Branch arrive in Altoona at 7. 40 a. p. m., 7.15 p. m., and 8..M) p. m. Liara 7. 40 a. m., 9.20 a. 2.40 p. m., and 7.40 Trmia4on tbe T. ft C. Railway leave Tyrone at 1.10 ft. m. anrt 7.10 p. tn.', returning, arrive in Ty- a. m. and 6.0Q p. m. TnUm   i-ley R. R............... Copland Co... 22 of Jersey.. F'ft, Boffalo R. R.. Philadelpl ia R. R........ 11 -R. R............. 20M R. R............ 11.W 10S% JOdJjJ 113 114V< 111% 123% 1'OK 106J< 4414 1ST s'4 2T 17 105I-.V HARRY SLEP, Proprietor. Corner Eleventh Avenue and Twelfth Street, ALTOONA, BLAIR FA. STATE NEWS. workmen on the. new Sandy Kan Railroad have struck for wages. county owes and it is expected that it will all be paid this year.- was run over and instantly killed, laat week, near Hopewell, in Bedford county. Murphy movement has taken.Law- rence county by storm. Over signa- tures are now reported. possesses a curious phe- young gentlemen with blonde hair and a black mustache. Henry Lucas, of Philadel- phia, injured Tuesday in the railroad col- lision, died on Wednesday. men were killed and fourteen wounded in the eastern district of the Wy- oming coal fields during last.month. "Black Maria" is a two- wheeled-truck on which drunken men are strapped and hauled to the lock np. Huff was recently killed on the line of the Lewisburg, Centre and. Spruce Creek Railroad by the falling of a tree. Schuylkill county, has several new small-pox cases, and it is re- ported that the disease exists in Po.Usville. Cats' ,Run Coal Company..will tuild one hundred ovens below New Ge- nera, OH the Monongahela this spring. Samuel Wolf, a wealthy and es- teemed lady, in Danville, hung herself on Saturday. JNo cause is assigned for the terrible act. entertainments, with admission fees of five cents, seem to be going the rounds. The ladies of Beaver, Pa., have just started a series of them. Penn cotton mill, of Allegheny, has been bought by a stock company with a capital of f and will resume op- after a long idle spell. Lehigh Valley refused to pay a tax of on the bridge tween Easton and Phillipsburg, and the case is to be taken .to the Supreme Court. Philadelphia papers announce the death, on the 14th inst., of Matilda Re- becca, widow of tbe late Rev. John Cham- bers, D. D., and daughter of the late Levi Eilmaker. A. Murray, a conductor on a local freight train of the Pennsylvania railroad, was run over and killed near Williamsport, Friday evening, the cars passing over his leg near the Lip. Keystone Paint Company is erect- ing a new mill at the junction of the Muncy Canal with the West Branch Canal. The mill will be driven by a fifteen horse en- gine, and will contain all the machinery necessary to prepare the paint for market. broom factory baa been started in Washington, and the first broom was made on last Thursday. The Reporter says they will soon be turning them out by the hun- dred dozen, and that the factory is under- stood to be the most complete one in the United States. have suffered severely this winter in all parts of the State. The cause is at- tributed to a scarcity of bees' food last fall, the bees having commenced to consume their store earlier than usual in the season, thereby exhausting their supply before the end of the winter. expenses of Columbia county, for the trial of Hester, McHngh and Tulley, amounts to about Tne payment of witnesses was no small item, as there were eighty-seven iu all, and the highest amount paid to any one (Con. O'Grarrah, from was Erie Observer saya: "The ice in the bay has been gradually breaking up during the past week, and a considerable strip of clear water is now to be seen ex- tending from the entrance half way to the cocks. Lake men generally anticipate an early opening of navigation." new Oliphant Furnace, in Fayette county, is now making twelve tons of metai daily. The Uaiontown and West Virginia Railroad, which is about to be merged with the Southwest Pennsylvania Railway, is graded alongside of this furnace. The road extends from Uniontown to Fair- chance. English institution of game pre- serves has been introduced into Berks county by a local Sportsmen's Association. They have leased acres of forest, j field and stream, which they will stock with birds and fishes. They pay each of the fifteen farmers who own the land five dollars a veAr divide this of i fines for "poaching" with the farmers on i whose territory game is killed. Several 1 hundred qnail and pheasants will be set liberty this Spring. i j Cheapest Alpaca in the city at the Bee Hive Store.of S. Sprankle Bro.' TELEGRAPHIC. Not Hung. MAUCH CHUNK, Pa., March a Mollie Maguire, was not executed yesterday, his case having been taken to the Supreme Court. Joe Goss Captured. NEW YQBK, March Joe Goss, the Eng- lish pugilist, and a principal in the Goss- Allen prize fight, has been arrested and held to await the arrival of the Kentucky officers. EVANSVILLE, March 9. A fire in Posey block yesterday morning destroyed Weber's bat store and Gross' clothing store. Weber's loss is insurance Gross' loss is Insurance Loss on building insurance The origin of the fire is unknown. That Supreme Judgeship. WASHINGTON, Maroh 9, 1877. The va- cancy on the Supreme Bench occasioned by the election of Judge Davis to the Senate, is attracting much attention, and the friends of the aspirants are not idle. Upon whom the choice may fall is yet a matter of doubt, for no .action will be taken, until after the Cabinet shall have been confirmed. Attempted Murder. March 9. Win. F. Speakman, of Oak Pale, was arrested yesterday morn- ing while killing his wife, who was rescued. The dead body of his sister, seventy years old, was found in a woodshed, head and body almost cut to pieces. Speakman is a mill operator. He was insane from liquor for several days, and drunk when the murder was committed. NEW XOHK, March, accordance with a call from prominent citizens a meet- ing was held in Wall street yesterday afternoon in front of the sub-Treasury, to express approval of the announced policy of President Hayes in regard to civil ser- vice reform and the pacification of the South. Before one o'clock the crowd father, timctlie meel- ing wag capflfd.to order there was a large assembly in the street and on the steps of buildings, Wm. A. Booth presided. Seven Lives Lost in Panic. a Church NEW YORK, March panic in-the church of Saint Francis Xavier in Sixteenth street near- Sixth avenue, last night, caused a rush of women from one of the galleries and in the tumult which ensued six women and one boy were trampled to death. The congregation was composed entirely of women and children, it being women's week in Lent. The number of persons in- jured could not be ascertained. The bodies of the unfortunates were taken to the Twenty-fifth precinct station house where they remain awaiting to be identified. Sherman's Successor, WASHINGTON, March confirma- tion of Senator Sherman as Secretary of the Treasury hag set in motion the contest for the succession to him in the Senate. The ability and services, of .the Hon. Stanley Matthews before the Electoral Commission will give him Executive countenance, and doubtless support. Attorney General Taft will leave at once for Columbus to look after his chances. General Garfield will also be a competitor in view of the fact that the administration will need a representa- tive in the Senate holding close relations with the President, and will command abil- ity and experience. Judge Matthews will in all probability be the choice of the Leg- islature. The Senate Committees. WASHINGTON, March Republi- can Senators held a caucus yesterday morning, at which the report of the com- mittee appointed to revise the standing committees was submitted and adopted. The minority gets increased representation, so that instead of three the will have four places out of nine on each con- political committee, with perhaps the ex- ception of one or two committees which are of a quasi-political character. The Repub- licans have provided for Senator Davis, of Illinois, by assigning him to the Judiciary Committee and Committee on Revision of Laws. The Democratic lines are not yet completed, and therefore no election of committees will be possible before to- day. The Republican members of the Finance Committee will Morrill (Chair- Ferry, of Nevada, Allison and Dawes. Bargains That No Others Can Match. alpaca worth 75 cents for 50 cents at Bowman The Eastern Question. LOKDOX, March .special dispatch from Berlin to the Pail Mall Gazette says General Ignatieff, throughout his stay here, has, in conversation with diplomat- ists, held out strong hopes of a peaceable solution, and intimates the willingness of Russia to disarm as soon as means of es- cape have been found out of .the present dilemma. His principal Secretary., Prince Tzertileff, has, in a private conversation, stated war to be inevitable, and that the ob- ject of his chief-s mission is to obtain for Russia authority from the Powers to inter vene in Turkey. That New York Fire. ;NEW. YpEK, March large number of workmen are digging in the still smoking ruins of the building Nos. 1 and ..3 Bond street, to extricate many safes embedded among the neaps of bricks and old iron. Two safes were dug ont and hoisted from the. cellar and were sent to the factories of the makers to be opened. One belonged to Robbing Appleton, and the other to Bald- win, Sexton Peterson. Another large safe was .uncovered belonging to the last named firm. Streams of water were directed upon the ruins, which still smouldered, and fire lines were maintained by the po- lice. The losers by the fire are unable to state their, losses, as much of their stock is in the unopened safes, which also contain their books. The loss of the jewelry firm of Taylor Bro., late Taylor, Olmstead Taylor, is estimated at more than insurance Great Bargains iu boots, thoos and gait- ers at the Bee Hive Store of S. Sprankle A Bro.' one price hats and caps at Rice's. 1330 CONDENSED NEWS ITEMS. loss by the fire in Bond street, New York, on Tuesday nigbt, is now esti- mated at upwards of President stated that he did not intend to convene the extra session of Con- gress for an earlier date than about the 1st of June. E. A. Burke returned to New Orleans from Washington. From assur- ances, he received he is satisfied the Nich- olls government will not be disturbed. Ursula Terhune, aged 73, and Mrs. Eleanor Keut, aged 63, were burned to death in Hackeneack, N. J., on Monday night, by the, explosion of a coal oil lamp. Harper ana1 HoTTector and clerk of the Eighth Revenue District of Illinois, charged with frauds, hag been dis- missed by the U. S. Court, in Springfield, on recommendation of Attorney General Taft. Republican State Central Commit- tee of Louisiana, unanimously adopted a resolution asking Mr. Piuchback to resign as their President and as a member of the National Republican Committee, the resig- nation to be sent in before the 17th inst. T. Beads, Secretary of the California Stock Exchange in San Francisco, has dis- appeared with the books and papers of the Exchange and worth of stocks de- posited as security for loans effected from its'fuuds. Collusion with other officers of the Board is suspected. Ross and others, representing the tribes in the Indian Territory, called upon the President to ascertain his Indian policy. He said he could indicate no spe- cial line of action until after the formation of his CaHnet, but he did not think there would be any essential chattgw. large crowd was attracted to the Col- umbus, 0., depot Wednesday evening by the report that Mr. Tilden was to pass through the city en route South. The Democratic ward organizations and a full band were present in force, and much in- dignation was manifested wLen it was dis- covered that the story was a practical joke of some one. H. Lewis, who died at his home in Hoboken a few days ago, aged eighty-six, was for many years in the stationery business in Nassau street, New York, and accumulated property of more than He bequeathed his en- tire estate to the Government to help pay the national debt, making George D. H, Gilleapie, of the Manhattan Bank, his ex- ecutor. It is believed that he had no rela- tives living. years ago Miss Athers, of Porter- ville. advertised tor a husband. John R. Johnston, of Vermo'nt, responded, and after a brief acquaintance they were mar- ried, and Johnston obtained a situation in a bank at Porterville. On Wednesday of last week a fonner wife of Johnston made her appearance. He acknowledged that he was a man when he married Miss Athers, and the latter shot through the heart and died instantly. very sad affair occurred at Coal Run, near Marietta, O., Wednesday, resulting in the death of a young man named Davis. The victim, with some school was rehearsing a minor drama for a school exhibition. At one place tne action of the drama required man to stab another, and in carrying that ont a companion Rumble .-tabbed at Davis, who wore a breast protector. Unfortunately Rumble missed the protector, the blade of the weapon penetrated Davis' heart, and he fell SENATE PROCEEDINGS. Sherman Confirmed Other Not Acted On. WASHINGTON, March Senate re- sumed consideration of the unfinished busi- ness, being the resolution of Mr. Bayard, of Delaware, "that the credentials of John T. Morgan, Senator-elect from the State of Alabama, he taken from the table, and that he be sworn." Mr. Spencer, of Alabama, moved to amend the resolution 80 as to refer the cre- dent! Ala of JMr. Morgan to the Committee on Privileges and Elections. After some debate the resolution that Mr. Morgan, of .Alabama, be sworn in as a Sen- ator was agreed to without division. Mr. Wallace then offered a resolution that Mr. Grower, of Oregon, be sworn in. Mr. Conkling then addressed the Senate making the point that there was no simili- tude between the Oregon and Louisiana cases. In the one he said.a legally recog- nized and onstitutional legislature existed, in the other there were two claimants for the governorship and two distinct bodies each pretending to be the true legislature of the State. The general government so far had been unable to decide upon the merits of either and so he considered the reference of Kellogg's case to the committee an eminently proper course, bat Mr. Grover should be sworn in at once and any charges now made against him might be investi- gated hereafter. During his remarks Mr. Conkling defended the policy of the new administration as foreshadowed in the in- augural address. Mr. Thurman stated that he had been authorized by. ME. Grover to state that he (Grover) courted the.fullest investigation that when he was Admitted he would offer a resolution for the appointment of committee for that purpose. Mr. Grover was sworn in. The Senate then went into executive ses- sion, and when the doors were reopened ad- journed. Immediately after the Senate went into executive session at four o'clock this after- noon a motion was made to take from the table and bring before the Senate for action the nomination of Mr. Sherman aa Secre- tary of the Treasury. Objections being in- troduced on the ground that the nomina- tttm been ordered to referred to Finance Committee when appointed, and that it could not now be acted tipon with- out unanimous consent, Mr. Wheeler de- cided that the rules applicable to reference to committees, etc., were not in force, aa no committees were in existence. After considerable discussion concerning the point of order the decision was sustained without a division. The question was then taken on the confirmation of Mr. Sherman's nomination. It was confirmed by the vote of the Republican Senators against 26 votes in the negative cast by Democratic members of the body. Several of the Detr ocratic Senators.refrained from voting. No attempts were made to confirm any of the other Cabinet nominees. Legislative. March tbe Senate the following bills passed finally To per- mit fishing with nets in the waters of the Commonwealth. Providing the means for securing the health and safety of persons employed, in the bituminous coal mines of Pennsylvania. In the House various appropriations were passed, among which was an act to appropriate for the relief of certain coua- ties which have sustained unusual ex- penses in suppressing and bringing to jus- tice mpmbers of the secret order of Ancient Hibernians or Molly Magtiires. at the dress goods, ten and twelve cents per yard, at the McDowell Mercantile Company's (limited) store.' Dyspepsia. Dyspepsia. Dyspepsia is most perplexing of all human ailments. Its symptoms are almost infinite in their variety, and the forlorn and despondent victims of the disease often fancy themselves the prey, in turn of every known malady. This ix due, in. part, to the close sympathy which exists between the atom- ach and the brim, and in part also to the fact that any disturbance of the digestive function necessa- rily disorders the liver, the bowels and the nervous system, and effects, to some extent, the quality of the blood. E. F. Kunkel's Bitter Wine of Iron a sure cure. This is aot a new preparation, to be tried wanting; it has been prescribed daily for many years in the practice of eminent physicians with unparalleled success it is not expected or intended to cure all the diseases to which the human family is subject, bat is warranted to cure Dyspepsia in Us most obstinate form. Kunkel's Bitter Wine of Iron never fails to cure. Symptoms of Dyspepsia are loss of aupetite, wind And rising of the food, dryness of the mouth, heartburn, distension of the stomach and bowels, constipation, headache, dizziness sleepless- ness and low spirits. Try the great remedy and be convinced of its merits. Get the genuine. Take only Kunkel's, wh'.ch is put only in 259 North Ninth St., Philadelphia, Tape Worm Entirely removed with pureiy rr.edSciae, passing from the system aHw. Xa fee until tbe head and refer to patients treated. Or. E. F. 'Z'O North Ninth St., Phila- delphia. Advice Seat, Pi a aod Stomach Worms also remowJ. The medicine for all others hut Tape ask frr K WOKS SYRUP. Price, BUSINESS CABDS. Iff P. TtERKET, Attorney-at-Law, to. 1128 EleTenth ATeBneJ: attention giren to collMttoa ilaims in Blair, Cambria, Huntingdon, Mi Clear field counties, pi EO. A. DOBTNK, Attorney-at-Law, Allegheny Street, attention glrem to CollMttoa Jlaimi in Blair and adjoining counties. r D. UOET Attorney-at-Law. mSTICI Of THl P1ACX AJTD COLUCTOB, TAMES F. Attorney-at-Law, i43 Allegheny Street, HolUdajnbnrf t ttttfetlott given to the Collection cf 8f dford, Cambria, Huntingdon. and U14 Countiei. JOHN B. McFARtAJSE, Justice of the Peace And Collector, HOLLIDAYSBimGr, PA. at the Hollidaysbnrg foaadfy U4 MMhlne Shoo. HKOW, M. D., Physician and Surgeon. OflM on Seventh bttwMn lltk nl F. KEB1L J. TV. KERR FINDLEY, i INSURANCE AGENTS. OFFICE, Second Floor Jfew Altoona Baa ft Building, lltventh avenue, between Twelfth and TMrUtaUl streets, Altoona. Pa. 1860 Altoona Bread 1877 AND CEACKEE BAKEETf ONLY CRACKER BAKERY in ALTOONA. F. HEESS, Proprietor. No. 713 Thirteenth Street. OoBinon ami faacy to notlM. PAIBB, ABLETT CO, 23 and 25 Seventh Street, JPIXTSUUROII, Manufacturers and Dealers in All Kinds of Write for prices before baying our prices arc fti ways as low as good oils can be famishtd FURNITURE! FURNITURE! 1008 ELEVENTH AVENUE, OPPOSITE FBEIGHT DEPOT. We have jnst received a fall line of all of Parlor, Chamber and Kitchen FURNITURE for the spring trade, such as Lounges, Mattresses, Chamber Suits, Beds, Springs, and stands, in fact every article found iu a class store, which we w'ill positively sell 2O per Cent Less than they can be bought for elsewhere in this city. We sell for cash, avoiding thereby losses by bad debts, and are offering goods at the X.OWEST PRICES. Please give ns a call acd price oir purcha.KiDK elsewhere. JOsIAH ARTHUR, LEWIS TIPTOJf, Salesman. Proprietor. R. A 0. KERR CO., No. 1316 Kailroad Street, Altoona, Pa. ESTABLISHED IN 1856. Brokers and Dealers iu Foreign Exchange. POLICIES ISSUED and losses promptly paid at our office. No. 1310 BaU- road atreet, Altooaa Pa. INSURE NONE BUT HOXEST FAKTIZ9 and pay honest losses promptly. Wl SELL TICK1TS TO AWT PORT IN 1USOP1. A FARM AND HOMI OF TOUR OW2T Now is the Time to Secnre It best aid cheapest lands in the market, IASTERN NEBRASKA, on the of PACIFIC RAILROAD. The farorabla terms aid rates of and freight to all settlers. markets. new edition of TBB free Addww, 0 T. Cota'r, F. P. R. R   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication