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Altoona Mirror Newspaper Archive: January 12, 1980 - Page 1

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Publication: Altoona Mirror

Location: Altoona, Pennsylvania

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   Altoona Mirror (Newspaper) - January 12, 1980, Altoona, Pennsylvania                                Altoona Nips Johnstown (16th Eltoona SKirror VOL. 179 PHONE 944-7171 Altoona, Pa., Saturday Evening, Jan. 12, 1980 Founded June 13, 1874 20< a COPY Mobile Home Blown Over; Wind Damage High in Area Winds gustlng at up to 45 miles per hour this morning knocked over a mobile home on Sandy Run Road in Logan Township and battered the rest of the county. A mobile home occupied by James Stoller Jr, and his family was knocked from its foundation at about a.m. It rolled over and crashed into several trees. Mr. Stotler said that he, his wife and son climbed from the wreckage, but his two-month old daughter, Jamie Lynn, was trapped inside. While waiting for a rescue squad, Mr. Stotler got an axe, chopped a hole in the side of Ihe trailer and removed the baby. AMED took the infant to Altoona hospital for treatment. Hospital officials refused to reveal her condition. The Greenwood and Pinecroft volunteer fire companies were called to shut off utilities. Logan Township Police also were at the scene. The mobile home was demolished. It was not known whether it or its contents were insured. Elsewhere in the area, tree limbs and wires were reported down. A spokesman for Penelec said lines were down everywhere and the company began send- ing crews out at a.m. Forty men were making repairs at about a.m. The Altoona Fire Department responded to 10 calls for downed wires between and a.m., and each time stood by until Penelec crews arrived. (See WIND, Page THE JAMES STOTLER JR. family was suddenly awakened this morning when their mobile home on Sandy Run Road was knocked from Its Photo by Don Baker foundation. Mr. Stotler rescued his two-month-old daughter trapped Inside by chopping a hole in the trailer with an axe. (Other photos on Page 21.) Parking Garage Proposed at Altoona Hospital By DON HOPEY Staff Writer Two of five alternatives contained in a feasibility study recently completed for Altoona Hospital recommend a parking garage be built for hospital personnel and visitors a project that the Altoona Parking Authority has sought for some time. Robert S. Powers, acting chairman the Parking Authority and a member of the hospital's building and grounds com- mittee, revealed the feasibility study in- formation at the authority's monthly meeting Friday. "I think that's a hot Mr. Powers said in response to a question about Ihe authority's involvement in a hospital-area parking garage project re- cently promoted by Mayor Allan G. Han- cock. "I think we'll see something explode on that soon." Mr. Powers said the feasibility study was completed three months ago by Ramp Engineering Inc., a New York slate firm, and since that time has been under con- sideration by the hospital's building and grounds committee. Two of the five alternatives contained in the study recommend that the hospital provide garage-type parking on the site of its new parking lot at the corner of Howard Avenue and 8th Street. Mr. Powers said no decisions have yet been made on alternatives contained in the report. "That feasibility study is still in com- he said. "We have to make a recommendation to the hospital finance committee and then the two committees have to make their report to the hospital board." "We've been waiting for the hospital to authority member Bernard Dembert said. "We have letters we sent them on the subject from 197-J or 1975. We even proposed ttiat we'd do the feasibility study." Siill an Open Question Crisis May Lead to Olympic Boycott WASHINGTON (UPI) The growing Soviet-American confrontation over Af- ghanistan has raised Hie possibility of an Olympic boycott, This latest developments in one of America's two crises reflected the admin- istration's determination to convince the Kremlin it must pay a price for its Afghan incursion. The Soviets now have over com- bal troops and advisers in Afghanistan, and administration officials estimated the Russians have suffered between 900 and casualties, both killed and wounded, since the invasion began Dec. 27. The possibility of an Olympic boycott by the United States was first raised by Soviet Action Deplored at U.N. Session Major Guerrilla Groups United Against Soviets Page 3 President Carter on Jan. 4 and expanded by Vice President Mondale and first lady Rosatynn Carter, who both proposed mov- ing (he summer games out of Moscow. State Department spokesman Hodding Carter said the matter of U.S. partici- pation in the Olympics "is still an open question." "The final (U.S.) decision rests still in In the Rollin' Along Roller skating Is stepping up and outside and the craze that's INDEX Accidents 1J Kids 11-12 28 Movies 11-17 .28-33 Obituaries 4 Strategy Game Altoona Area High School werestl-ing coach Marty Rusnak made Hie strategic moves to assure his team's success against Hollidays-burg's Golden Tigers 22. Tax Tale Wllllamsburg Borough Council took another look at in 1980 budget. 5 Opinion 18 Farm 9-11 Religion Feature! 8 Sports 22-29 1 TV Listing 17 WEATHER TONIGHT: Fair, very cold with low 5 to 15. TOMORROW: Partly cloudy, high in 30s. Details 7 bad news there's slrll a lax increase included to support It. The good news Page ClrcuUtloa: the hands of the Soviet Union, in its response to the international outrage over its imperialistic activities in Afghanistan and on what steps it may take." .Sen. David Pryor, D-Ark., said fie will introduce a resolution Jan. 22, when the Senate reconvenes, calling on the U.S. Olympcc Committee to petition the In- ternational Olympic Committee to re- locate the games. And Rep. Clarence Milter, R-Ohio, sent a letter lo Ihe mayor of Montreal asking if that city would consider hosting the games. Spokesman Carter charged the in- vasion of Afghanistan changed the mili- tary and geopolitical borders both Iran and Pakistan share with'the Soviet Union. Those Countries, he said, "now have much longer borders wilti a Soviet Union which has shown itself to be perfectly capable of aggression against a neighbor.11 The spokesman said the announced release of all political prisoners in Af- ghanistan was just "a public show (since) there are strong indications that a number of political prisoners have been retained and other have been added." Other officials said the Soviets have executed about 300 Afghans. In other developments: Watson, the U.S. am- bassador to Moscow who was recalled shortly after the invasion, is remaining in Washington. However, Soviet Am- bassador Anatoly Dobrynin, who has been in the Soviet Union since December, was scheduled to return to Washington this weekend. experts from leading grain- exporting countries are meeting today in Washington to discuss the possibility of coordinating with the United States its grain embargo against Ihe Soviet Union. Since the idea surfaced, Mr. Dembert said the authority has made'Several dif- ferent proposals to the hospital on the project; including management and au- thority ownership, hospital ownership and authority management, and ownership and management both by the authority. Although the most recent mention of the.authority's involvement in a hospital- area garage came from Mayor Hancock, Mr. Dembert said the mayor has not followed up Ihe idea to the authority. "Our only contract with Mayor Han- cock consisted of a conversation two weeks ago in which he said, 'Let's get together on this thing Mr. Dern- bert said, Mr. Powers indicated he would favor such a project if serious talks with Hie hospital ever get started, "I think a garage would be the an- he said, "ll would be a great thing for the Parking Authority and would have to be a moneymaker." In olher authority business, 1979 year- end income figures totaling from daily parking income, monthly park- ing fees, the park-and-shcp program, meter violations and other miscellaneous sources were announced. The authority will also realize an addi- tional from city parking meters. A total of was collected from city parking meters in 1979, and according to an agreement the authority says it has with the city, all meter revenues over are split between the city and the aulhority. The total revenue of the authority is more than SlG.QOO over the 1978 total. All areas of income, daily parking, monthly parking and meter violation payments, were up in 1979 over the previous year, except for the park-and-shop program. That program brought in in 1979, less than in 1978. The authority also announced Jls em- ployees had decided not to join tlie Ameri- can Federation of Slate, County and nicipal Employees District Council 83, in a vote taken Dec. 3. Of the nine ballots cast (the parking authority hi-is 11 employees bui I wo were dis- qualified from the five favored no representation and four favored union representation. Iranians Riot After Dissidents Executed TEHRAN, Iran (UP1) Rioting sup- porters of dissident Ayatullah Kazem Shariat-Madari went on a rampage in the northwestern city of Tabriz today alter 11 of (heir comrades were executed by firing squad. The protesters burned cars, smashed telephone kiosks and set fires in the streets in a burst of violence coming close on the heels of clashes during the past 48 hours which Jeft 10 persons dead. Revolutionary guards fired into the air and used tear gas to disperse the demon- strators, estimated at several thousand, who moved through the center of town as news of the executions spread. The prosecutor-general denounced the executed men as "agents ol American imperialism, agents of the shah's political police Savak and known criminals." Another official statement said the Moslem Peoples Republican Party, Ayatollah Kazem Shariat-Madari's loyal- ist political group, was a "den of corrup- The men were caught drunk and (iring their rifles at the people hours before they were shot, the statement said. The executions added a new element to the political course of Shariat-Madari's followers after the ayatollah publicly an- nounced last week he was withdrawing from the conroversy. He called on the Moslem Peoples Republican Party to drop its opposition to the Islamic regime. In Tehran, officials made no im- mediate comment on the postponement of the U.N. Security Council debate on a resolution for sanctions against Iran. But Oil Minister Ali Akbar Moinfar warned that Iran would not sell oil to any country which joined U.S.-inititated eco- nomic sanctions against the Islamic re- public. Pars said shops in Tabriz opened today but shut down again when "a crowd attacked the bazaar, throwing stones and breaking the windows of a number of shops.1' Most of the schools remained closed, the agency said. The 11 persons executed were among a group seized Friday at the local head- quarters of the Moslem People's Re- publican Party in Tabriz. Their identities were not immediately confirmed, re- porters said. A spokesman of the Tabriz Revolu- tionary Court said additional executions were scheduled, but he gave no details of the cases involved. The official Pars news agency said two Moslem people's party members and a revolutionary guard were killed in the battle Friday for control of the party headquarters. Pars said authorities ar- rested 30 persons at the building. That meant that 19 persons could still face trial in the Islamic court which ordered the execution of the 11 Saturday. "They opened up on people with ma- chines guns, threw grenades and kept up a barrage of fire, defying the people's ad- (See IRAINS, Page 3) Mallo Coins May Become Valuable Collector Items By TOM GIBB Stall Writer It happened lo the hula hoop, too. Fifteen years ago, the candy company currency known as the Mallo Cup card was a popular promotional item included in the wares turned out by the local Boyer Bros Inc. Each card was a piece of the company's play money ranging from 1 cent to and sweettoothed fans coutd redeem in Ihe currency for 10 Mallo Cups or similar Boyer candy. It became a near-trademark. But times change. The once-popular Mallo Cup card "is becoming old Boyer President Gordon Draper said Friday, and it may be on its way to being phased out. The company has already dropped the cards from the candy it sells through vending machines and in multiple packs. And now, Mr. Draper said, the company "is seriously thinking" ol doing away with (hem all together. Candylovers once collected the cards with the same fervor that breakfast zealots hoarded cereal boxtops to get the likes of Captain America decoder rings. The company markets the candy nationwide, a far cry from its Depress ion-era beginnings as a basement fudge- making operation, and claims to be second only to Hershey in sales of that kind of candy. MALLO COINS, 1)   

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