Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Altoona Mirror Newspaper Archive: January 15, 1965 - Page 17

Share Page

Publication: Altoona Mirror

Location: Altoona, Pennsylvania

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Altoona Mirror (Newspaper) - January 15, 1965, Altoona, Pennsylvania                                ALTOONA, FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 1965. Hltoona SKtrror DRIVERS WARNED No Extension of Deadline On Inspection or Licenses CENTRAL PENNSYLVANIA NEWS AND PICTURES Wsuit M4-717L_17 HARRISBURG -Pennsylvania' motorists will be given "a short count" by the calendar this year in which to comply with two re qulrements ot the law. Secretary o( Revenue Theodore B. Smith Jr. today pointed out that drivers must be in posses- sion of their new operator's li- cense and owners must have passenger cars and station wag- ons inspected to meet a dual leadline which arrives at mid- night, Jan. 31. He warned that here will be no extension in either deadline. "Since Jan. 30 is, in effect, Ihe inal day with Jan. 31 falling on Sunday this year, motorists in he habit of waiting until the inal day of a licensing period and inspection campaign will ind they are just one day too ate to continue driving without nterruption." Further complicating matters MAYOR PROCLAIMS MARCH OF DIMES MONTH IN CrfY-Mayw William H. Thursday tifned a praelamatkw dep- uting the month of January as March of Dimes Mtolh hi Aktoaa. Shown with Mayor Prosstr (left Mrs. Ami Weyaadt, Ann Elizabeth Weyant and Stanley Krish, Alloona chairman for the March of Dimes campaign. January Named March of Dimes Month In City The month of January was pro- claimed officially March of Dimes Month Altoona when Mayor William H. Prosser on Thursday signed the proclamation at his of- fice In City Hall. The proclamation follows: Whereas, birth defects are a national tragedy resulting in the killing and crippling of more children each year than any other human disorder and Whereas, thousands of these children are threatened with physical disability or mental retardation for life, and Whereas, prompt arid proper medical attention can prevent disability in many hirth De- fect victims, and Whereas, the March of Dimes through its network of medical care centers in Penn- sylvania and the nation is of- fering such exemplary treat- ment, and Whereas, scientific research supported by the March of Dimes has already uncovered clues which may lead to the control of certain types of birth defects, and Whereas, the successful de- velopment of polio vaccines through the March of Dimes gives us confidence in this great voluntary health agen- cy's ability to deal with the terrible problem, of .birth de- fects, now Therefore, I, William Pros- ser, mayor of do hereby proclaim January 1965 as March of Dimes Month and do strongly urge all of our people to give this campaign their full support. Woman, 26, Turns Herself Into Torch COLUMBIA, Mo. daughter of a university profes sor, described as beset by per sonal problems, drenched her self with gasoline in a lonel barn, struck a match, an erupted in flames in a Vie Nam-style torch suicide Thurs day. Police hunted today for a mys terious telephone tipster wh warned them ahead of time lha Ann Atherton 26, was plannin to kill herself. "He said he'd read about In the paper if she did and she didn't, he'd see her tomo: said police Capt. J. C Smith. "We're hoping he'll, step for ward and identify himself." Miss Atherton's charred bod was found in an abandons bam on the west edge of Co lumbfa. She was the daughte of Dr. and Mrs. Lewis Athe ton. Is a history professo at the University of Missouri. Dr. Richard Johnson, Boon County coroner, described th death as "definitely suicide, and said the dead woman "ha had personal problems for number of years" and had bee under psychiatric care. Johnson said the girl reache the barn by taxi, which fir: took her to a filling station 1 purchase a five-gallon can gasoline. She told the cab dri' er she needed the gas for he stalled ear. Smith urged the anonymou caller to give his name if h was a friend of the girl." The caller asked police to In vestigate, and after saying h could read about the suicide the paper, hung up. Police called Miss Atherton parents, who said they unde stood she had left her apart mcnt in a taxi. Police locate the cab driver, who had drive only two miles since Icavin Mfss Atherton at the harn. Officers arrived at the harn while the smoke was sllll risin; Altoona Hospital Admitted Patricia' Hopkins, Tyrone RD 4. Lois Nichols, Box 73A. Rose Rodkey, Utahville. Ann M. Fama, 719 Howard Ave. Donna L. Long, 11} Willow Ave. Kenneth Shildt, Duncansville D 1. Deborah Wolfe, 415 Spruce Ave. Dennis Blackie, 1018 4th Ave. Mary Ritchey, 105 E. 26th Ave. Nelson Wise, 801 S. Main St. Louis Johnson, 71} George Ave Ruth Ray, 717 4th Ave., Juniata Betty Buckrop, 1111 15th Ave. Rose DeLuca, 431 1st Ave. Edna Barley, 309 21st Ave. Mary Gibbons, 2419 Beale Ave. Joyce Grass, 1331 Harrison Ave, Roberta Stuart, 810 7th Ave. Mary J. Beere, 417 7th Ave. Joseph Miller, Huntingdon. Janet Farabaugh, 104 Perm St irive, Greenwood. Tina M. Leafer, 710 Crawforc ve. Luigi Battisti, 412 Bell Ave. Patti Reed, 204 Crawford Ave John Bpggs, 110 Lloyd St. Judy Sinclair, Coalport. John Rife, 2723 Walnut Ave. Discharged Peggy Yingling, 1220 Spruce St. [ollidaysburg. Robert Trostle, 408 5th Ave. William Stacey, 802 6th Ave. unlata. Doris Stellabotte and infant, 11' Pearl St. David Sky, 4121 3rd Ave. S. Chalmer Barr, 330 7th Ave. uniata. Susan Hoffman, Lancaster, Donald 22nd Aye Joy HJunel, 304'22nd Ave. Betty Masdiue, Oak Ave Ama Roles, 1319 7th St. Delia Figart, 102 3rd Ave. Ccrro Plant Plans Million Addition lo Alloona BELLEFONTE- Major exna to cost in excess of (I m lion, In Cerro Plant No. 4 on Rou approved by the directors of Ce ro Copper and Brass Company. Exljthig- melting capacity he expanded and facilities for r cefvfng, processing and storage raw materials improved, Work I eludes square foot add! tkm to plant No. 4 entailing rdoca 13. The plant now employs Jnion Presses or Pact Okay NEW YORK a government report that the ve-day dock strike was costing early three times as much as iginally estimated, longshore inion leaders and some rank nd filers today pressed on with ettlements in all East and Gulf orts. The agreement provided he industry's first guaranteed nnual wage as a hedge against gradual reduction in work ang sizes. Union shop stewards and members favorable to the pact irculated petitions on the piers rging a revote on the proposed ontract. The ILA leadership id not specify how many sign- rs it believed it was seeking jefore "scheduling' ores employed here. However, ILA President Paul Morgan, 1319 Greenwood Thomas W. Gleason-said "no "J ew vote will be called for unti: lie members make it clear thai hey want to vote again anc tiat they understand the con- ract Failure of the ontract to win ratification the irst time was attributed in arge measure to rank and file onfusion about its terms. Road. Myrtle Richards, Fitzgeral Cursing Home. Linda McGregor, Williamsbur RD2. Karen Aurandl, 612 Clark St lollidaysburg. Margaret Dairs, Tyrone RD 2 Mildred Pfahler, 709 N. 1st St Jellwood. George Holland, 829 5th- Ave Loyal Shaw, 1613 8th Ave. Yvonne Ajay, 2802 Furnace Ave Marion Lafferty, 2539 Oak Ave Edna Gray and infant, 701 How ard Ave. .Eddie Weldon, 606 N. 7th St Jellwood. CarolLidwcll, Ashville. Barbara Waite and infant, 21 E. 14th St., Tyrone. Hospital Treats Varied Injuries Among injuries treated In the A oona Hospital emergency room yesterday were: Norma Woomer, 637 Ya'.e Lan> rreenwood, injury to left leg an side of face. Steven Lewis, 1915 Walton Ave njury to left leg. David Roesch, 405 E. Crawfor Ave., fracture of fifth finger, righ land. Rebecca Freet, 813 15th St fracture of left wrist. Richard Kustaborder, E. Ma: St., Bellwood, foreign body i left eye. Kenneth Clapper, 1511 Alleghen St., Hollldaysburg, foreign body right eye. Raymond Singer Jr., 1100 51 Ave., Juniala, injury to left arm Mary Jane Beero, 417 7th Ave fracture of right leg, Evelyn Kohn, 629 Gordon St Allenlown, injury to left hand. Nicholas Martin, 201 E. 2n Ave., puncture wound of le hand. Lisa Conrad, 1206 5lh Ave Juniata, laceration of right ea Monica McCready, RD 4, Bo 202, laceration of tongue. Ross Eckard, 60S 22nd St., U eralion of right little finger. Martin Williams, RD 1, Bo 198, laceration of right little fi gcr, Josln Consalvo, 305 Cherry Ave sprain of right wrist. Dennis Witherow, 432 Crawfo Ave., laceration cf right eyel and lower lip. John Boggs, 110 Lloyd St., hca Injury. DELAY P.O. OPENING STATE COLLEGE-Delay of least a month in arrival of kx boxes to be installed In the ne State post offiw buildin _______ _________ S3 south of Bellefontc, has been may set back the date on whit the new structure is opened f public use, Postmaster Edgar Benner announced. The new per office will still become a section center on Jan.. 24, Patrons ma continue to get-their mail from the old post on W. Beav St. until the hew boxes ,'arriv lion of tome feet of Route Actual openta will be WVCK. York Brothers Win Show Beef Title 4th Time HARRISBURG (DPI) A )55-pound grand champion An- gus steer went on the auction slock today at the state Farm Show with the sale price expec- ted to exceed J5 per pound. Buyers from numerous state and nation-wide firms were on hand for the traditional bidding on the 4-H grand champion baby beef. The winning animal was shown Thursday by Richard Rishel, 17, of ing the fourth York, mark straight yea forts to win converts to a nee-rejected contract. Federal Maritime Admim'stra- r Nicholas Johnson said mrsday the Maine to Texas ngshoremen's strike was sap- ng the nation's economy at e rate of million a day. eretofore, the cost to the mar- ime industry and related in- ustries was believed to be bout million daily. The strike began last Monday, iree days after ILA members n the New York-New Jersey aterfront rejected a proposed that one of the Rishel brothers has won the coveted title. Edward Rishel, Jr., won the ti lie in 1962 with a Shorthorn an rogram of marking and pre serving historic buildings and sites, carries on archeological sponsors and orig- nates publications, which are adding new dimension lo Penn- sylvania's story, edits the scries of Pennsylvania Archives, main- :ains the public records anc operates the State Museum. Dr. Stevens' leadership ol things historical in this stale has won for him an enviable place in the national profcssiona scene. He has-been a Iwo-lerm president of the American As- sociation for Stale and Local History, receiving its distin- guished service award in 1950, has headed the Association of Historic Sites Administrators, and i.s editorial consultant and member of the board of direc- tors of American Heritage. fiwanis Clubs a practical means .0 form enduring friendships, to render altruistic service, and to mild better communities; and to cooperate in creating and1 main- aining that sound public opinion and high idealism which make possible the increase of righteous- ness, justice, patriotism and good will. President Hasson reminded all members that the club would be Tuesday evening at the Tyrone Area High share with School cafcterfa to them in their pro- gram, "Boss of the Year Award Night." Group singing was led by the Rev. Bishop and invocation was given by William Black. Four more regional coordina- ors still are to be named.. Meanwhile Scranton approved a pair of poverty program pro- ects for Pittsburgh clearing he way for them to start. The wo proposed by Mayor Joseph M. Barr's Committee on Hu- man Resources have been clear- ed by the federal government. In one project 16 VISTA, or domestic peace corps volun- eers, will work in eight city neighborhoods to encourage dis- advantaged youth lo take voca- ional training or employment opportunities. The other in- volves a grant to the Pittsburgh Diocesan School 3oard to provide special scrv- ccs and recreational and cul- ural activities lo underprivi eged areas. Employe Reported Critically Injured Louis Johnson, 55, of 713 3eorge Ave., an employe at the P.R.R. Samuel Rea shop com slex at Hollidaysburg, was re- sorted to have been injurcc critically in a shop accident shortly before a.m. yes terday. Johnson was removed to the Altoona Hospital where he was admitted lo the special care sec tion following preliminary ex animation in the emergency dc partment. P.R.R. officials could not be reached for details concerning the accident. (MAYOR WELCOMES NEW CITIZEN Mayor WiMwn H. PTMser formally wnXe a tetter of to newest cWien, a lad (TMI SMth VM NW, who tad been wtopted tfw Potter Parents Plaa, Inc., by UM members A) the Alleona High School Key Club. Shown with Ihe mayor are (left to Joel Herman, Key Club member; Frank Rosen- hoover, faculty advisor; Dick Kloba, treasur- er; ScmiRfe Helming, pmidtnt, aad JHT Shaffer, chairman of the adoption committee, over e period of many years, Dr. Slevens has just had pub- lished his popular history "Penn- sylvania: Birthplace of a Na- tion." With Henry Steclc Com- maper, Stefan Lorant and other national historians, he has col- laborated in the writing ol "Pittsburgh, the Story of an Hollidaysburg. American which has gone1 Ihrough several printings. In 1926 Dr. Stevens married Ihe former Crescnce Miller, and ._ ________ _______ they have a son and three grand- Adding lo extensive authorship children. He and his wife life In Camp Hill, Survey Reveals Whereabouts of 1964 Graduates A survey of Ihe young people vho comprised the graduating class of 1964 at Altoona High ichool has brought responses from 90 and reveals interesting in- nformation on their present status, Tabulating the results, school authorities found 233 of the gradu- ates, 146 boys and 87 girls, 29.4 >er cent of the class, attending :ollege or junior college; 24 girls n hospital schools of nursing; 4 n practical nursing schools; 32 n beauty schools, and 25 in trade, echnical or business schools, a otal of 41.8 per cent furthering .heir education. Fifty graduates, 29 boys and 2t ;irls, were studying through the issistance of scholarships, loan or working grants. There were 142 young men and wo young women serving in the armed forces. Employed full time are 62 mem- bers of the class, 33 boys and 29 ;irls; employed part time arc 54 Joys and 19 girls; working out of town arc 20 of the graduates and 182, 51 boys and 131 girls, are seeking employment. NAMED MSI MANAGER HUNTINGDON-Vemon H. Lake of 1407 Warm Springs Road has been named plant manager of Huntingdon Scienlifics, Inc., to fill a vacancy which has existed sines July 1963. He came here In Sep- tember 1961 as an original mem- tier of the management team of HS1. He has been foreman and production manager. The meeting Is open lo the public and all members and friends of the society arc wel- come, the board of managers state, Admissions are available at the Camera Shop, the Book It Record Shop and In IS HOSPITALIZED Mrs. Hilda P. Bickel of 209 Crawford Ave. has been a surgical patient in Gcissinger Memorial Hospital, Danville, since Monday ind happy to hear from local friends. Hftr room number Is 433.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication