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Altoona Mirror Newspaper Archive: December 09, 1942 - Page 1

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Publication: Altoona Mirror

Location: Altoona, Pennsylvania

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   Altoona Mirror (Newspaper) - December 9, 1942, Altoona, Pennsylvania                                STOCKS-FINAL The Circulation of the Altoona Mirror Yesterday JRtrtor. WEATHER: SNOW FACTS ABOUT BLAIR COUNTY. Eph. Galbraith, elected register of wills in October, 1846, died election day and John M. Gibbony continued in office. 'OL. 58, NO. 15Z PHONE 7171 ALTOONA, PA., WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 9, 1942. TWENTY THREE CENTS TURIN, ITALY, IS DEVASTATED American Airmen Frustrate New Jap Scheme to Bolster Guadalcanal MISSING IN ACTION JOHN C. H. SMITH TWO KILLED, TWO INJURED MN TRUCK FIRE Occupants of Machine Are Cremated When Three Vehicles Come Tog-ether. 10 AJloyna Mirror. I BRDFORD, Dec. men wore cremated and two others were seriously injured this morning at 4.15 o'clock in o crash of three trucks on the superhighway six miles west of Bedford. The dead, both said to be resi- dents of Ambridgc, were identified by state motor police BB Bernard Swain and A. Melvin, The two injured and now pa- tients in the Timmins hospital here arc Albert Ticljen of Ambridge, driver of one truck, and Herbert Rittenhousc of Hanover, driver of another truck which figured in the mishap. AH Traveling One Way. All three trucks were traveling eastward and Die contents of the trucks was not divulged by slate motor police, probably being war material. Rittenhousc, driving a truck of the William Falconer, Pittsburgh Express company, had trouble and stopped on the highway and flag- ged down Albert Ticljen to help start the motor. Ticljen coupled his truck to the Rittenhouse truck and, after getting the motor start- ed, stopped to uncouple when a truck driven' by Wayne Longwell of Erownson, Mich., belonging to the Keeshin Motor Express company of Chicago, plowed into ths two for- trucks and both immediately t fire. quickly did the fire spread hat the two men in the truck with Tieljen could not be gotten out and were cremated. Trucks Arc Destroyed. Thrf Tie'iCn was owned by the Eazor Express com- puny of Bellevue und was destroy- iniur-T i n IT i ed, entailing a loss of Tiel- j "tllltrLAK ALAKlVI Jen suffered deep lacerations of the scalp, upper arm, right side and back, second degree burns of right ankle and leg and general body bruises. His condition is listed as serious at the Timmins hospital. The truck driven by Rittenhoilse was destroyed and the loss was placed at Ritlcnhouse suf- fers fractures of the pelvis, deep lacerations of the left side and brush burns of the body and face. His condition is said to be fair. The bodies of the two men were brought to the Pate funeral home here and relatives in Ambridgc were notified of the accident. REGISTRATION WARSHIP SUNK, NEW ANI) OLI) REPUBLICAN OF YOUNG MEN THREE OTHERS IS SCHEDULED LEFT AFLAME; I __ Eighteen Year Olds Dive-bombers and Must Sign Up With Their Selective Service Boards. The four selective boards in Al- jloona and the two in Blair county Torpedo Planes In- tercept Enemy North of Island. WASHINGTONfTD. C., Dec.! r couny' today perfected .plans for airmen on Gua- OFFICER BELIEVED RILLED IN BLAST Lieutenant, (senior grade) John Casper Henderson Smith, aged 25, of Altoona, reported "missing in action" aboard the U. S. S. Wasp sunk Sept. 15 In the battle for Solomons, was last seen in a sec- tion of the (loomed aircraft cgrricr destroyed hy a magazine explosion. it was learned today. Lieutenant Smith, a gunnery of- ficer aboard the Wasp, was well known another Wasp officer from Philadelphia, who has toltl his parents that no one serving on Lieutenant Smith's section of the carrier survived the explosion ot the magazine which doomed the ship. Known to his many friends in this city as Gappy, Lieutenant Smith is the son of Lieutenant and Mrs. .John Harold Smith, now at State College, where the father is in.command of the naval trebling grandson of the late Mr. and'Mrs.'M. H. Ca'nah of thi.s city. He was a graduate of the AltoOna High school, class of 1934, and of the United States Naval academy class of 193S. He served on the U. S. S, Saratoga and was trans- l sixth registration of men to be dalcana! frustrated a new Jap- conducted starting on Friday and anesp attempt to reinforce their continuing in: three periods! beleaguered troops on that throughout this month. i island Thursday by sinking Eighteen-year-old males are in- j a Japanese destroyer or cruiser eluded in those required lo sign up in the forthcoming registration warships afire. which will take place between the hours of 9 a. m. to R p. m. except Saturday, S a. in. to 12 noon, on the setting three other enemy days designated as follows: Registration Dales. "Those wlio were born i after July i, 1924, hut not Aug. 31, 1924, shall be >n or nftcr The navV had revealed j urday that dive-bomber and torpedo planes from Guadal- canal had intercepted a light enemy surface force. Today it announced that the enemy force comprised about Heavy Bombers from hies Rain Block-Busters Upon Industrial Center i For Knockout Blow WASHINGTON, D. C., Dec. Davis, director of the office of war information, said to- day that chaos is increasing in Italy but that advices to this government indicate there are no immediate prospects of a revolution by the Italian people against their German war allies. ending Thursday. Dec. 17. 1 "Those who were born after Sept. 1, 1924, but not i on any day during that at least four of them were hit. after- Planes Destroyed. itcred j in addition, the navy said, United the week com- j states fighters shot down ten floai- LONDON, Dec. hour-long procession of heavy bombers from the British isles' branch of the allied blast-Italy offensive rained four-ton bombs on the great industrial center of Turin during the night. The major raid came only five days after Amer- ican flying fortresses from the north Africa branch of the offensive pounded Naples, the great southern rs so mencing Friday, Dec. 18, 1942, and i enemy planes. Three of our ending, Thursday, Dec. 24, 1942. j were lost. Those who were horn on after Nov. 1, 1S24, but not after Dec. 31, 1924, shall be registered on any day during the period com- mencing Saturday, Dec. 2li, 18J2, and ending Thursday, Dec. 31, 1942. The enemy ships undoubtedly were attempting to bring sorely- needed supplies to the Japanese land forces scattered over Guadal- canal's hills. United States patrols slowly mopping up small the 18th anniversary of the day of their birth; provided, that If such anniversary falls on a Sun- day or a legal holiday, their regis- tration shall take place on the day hanl; burglar alarm system BOY'S SKELETON FOUND. NEWPORT, Pa., Dec. services held today for 5-ycar- old Glenn Smith, Mifflin, who was drowned eleven months ago when lie broke through the ice while skating on the Juimvhr river. The boy's skeleton was found in a pile of driftwood along Hie river bank yesterday about a mile cast of here. Nazis Uneasy "SchwarM oflicial publication of Ihe S. S. tlitc guards, yave the first indica- tion today that nazi officials wern beconiin? uneasy over the presence in Germany of mil- lions of foreign workers draft- ed from occupied countries. The according to the Ixmdon radio, pointed out that Ihe foreign workers owe no al- legilncc to Adolf Hitler, and therefore "not every crack in Germany's borders is stated Against enemy countries." The dispatch coincided with reports of new unrest find further resfrictions in occupied Euroite. In Poland a German troop Irain was derailed at Jiailorn, causing more than WO casual- tics, while guerrilla forces cut the railway line Zagreb, Jugoslavia, and blew up sla- (fons on (he line. In Danzijr anil Gydnia, in- were askrd to sur- render small arms and inu guns well us ammuni- tion. A Minilar order had Itccn issued in France, but the Vichy radio the regulation ilocs not apply to persons, who, "owing to the nature of (heir duties, arc lo the risk   Tourists were ordered LONDON, Dec. O.-AILicd artillery at s. j blasted back altncliing axis forces !in the hills back of Tobourha today, .icrordinj; to reports from Ihe front, and nn offieiil re- vealed twenty axis tanks have been destroyed. African hcadauartcrx reported wit of ho the Dolo- mite and Appcnniue mountain ureas, to make room for children, women and aged persons evacuated j from industrial cities. Perhaps to prevent workers from running away from their jobs jn nir raid target areas, the stiUi'-con- (rolle'i rciilro.uls announced that net tickets would bt sold without sr LIV1VVI.T S< that the nazi. tanks wore kticckcd I cial travel perniils. out in the hard battle of Sunday when the Germans were striving fiercely to blast American and Bril- AU ministerial offices, except those nf the armed services were ordered lo rlo.se at p. m. to selves from their jobs. Schools were ordered closed from Dct. lo Feb. 15 lo facilitate the evacua- tion nf children from cilics and to conserve furl, All civilian rail traf- fic was iifillftrt ext-cpt by spccia! (Continued on page 18, column 5) ish Iroops out of their strong hill! electric current and "fuel, positions in the Matcnr-Djcdcula- The death penalty was ordered Tcbourba triangle. j for robberies commitert during air I Tiip allied1 tomniuniVjiic coi'e.-de'J I r.-iids and prison terms for the destruction of three more on-j rommiUtrd during were emy -planes, including our brought i doubled. down Hi niKiiL Loss of (u-o AhissolinrV civil tic- allied planes was reported but pilot of one was safe. The communique indicated activity in the last twenty-font hours had died down somewhat with nolJiinx extensive thnn croe provided that any worUct jibanrionins lus post without sood reason would be tried by special tribunals in "1C "rMl Thermometers at Die" railroad On the Fence   column 4) le.st dcpcirlment building recorded :'S tlcsrnes as the low temperature nisht. ,19 rlcsrces as the hi-tt temperature yesterday afternoon and ,11 degrees as the temperature at 9 o'clock this rooming. >VKATHKK FOI5KCAST. WASKIXGTOX, IX C.. Dec. Western Pcnusylvnnia--Light snow nnci tonight, cndinsr in vrwft portion early tonight. Continwd rather   

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