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   Adair County Democrat (Newspaper) - June 16, 1938, Stilwell, Oklahoma                                VOLUME XLI STILWELL, ADAIR COUNffY, OKLAHOMA THURSDAY, JUNE 16, 1938 NUMBER 13. IRKS BY ATTITUDE Pierce Boom Amazes His Own Supporters As Strength Increases Rapidly MR. AND MRS. JEFF ATKERSON VACATION IN WASHINGTON, D. C. Indications this week bore out the predictions of political observers early in the campaign that the Pierce-Nichols battle for the second congressional district nomination would hold the limelight in this area. The campaign is beginning to sizzle, with Nichols supporters ransacking the woods desperately 'for votes. An action by Nichols early this week lost him much support in Muskogee county, it was declared. Since Jimmie Roosevelt, the president's son*, is scheduled to make a speech in Muskogee June 20, it was presumed that he would start Jack Nichols* campaign for reelection. The invitation committee at Muskogee wished to invite other guests and started to do so. Nichols, learning of this, according to the Muskogee Phoenix, promptly put the quietus on other invitations, giving the impression* that he wanted to make a one-man show of U in Muskogee. His selfish attitude irked backers of all senatorial �and gubernatorial candidates. Meanwhile Pierce .has been speaking many times daily and working out his county organizations, all of which are purely volunteers. He has spent the past week in Okmulgee county. Pierce backers were jubilant this week as reports of the young candidates gains came into headquarters. They could not believe that, at this early stage of the campaign, Pierce had mustered enough support to sew up Okmulgee county and Muskogee county. But.shrewd, observers declare that he will carry both counties, and by good votes. As Pierce is sure to carry Adair county, Haskell county and Wagoner county; the young Muskogeean appears unbeatable at this time. His backers, how-ver, are only working harder. The vaunted Nichols machine is expected to turn on its usual circus-like show for votes about June 20. Pierce has been holding back on his financial resources to meet the flood of Nichols money when it is released. o FREEWATER SCHOOL TO HOLD PIE SUPPER Mr. and Mrs. Jeff D. Atkcr-son left Thursday for Washington', D. C. where they w;li vacation for two weeks. Mr. Atker-son, cashier of jhe Bank of Commerce, said that he and his family will visit many sites of interest, including the national capitol and new federal buildings. -o-� THOMAS RELIEF WAGE APPROVED BY SENATE ADAIR AIR Cleve Bullet te Amendment by Senator Thomas Provides Minimum of $40 For W.P.A. Workers Washington, June 16. Special -The long fight waged by Senator Elmer Thomas (D., Oklahoma.) to raise the wage scale of WPA Workers in Oklahoma headed for success last week when the Senate adopted his amendment' to the pending relief bill which provides for a minimum monthly salary of $40 for unskilled workers. This amendment was included in the Senate version of the spend-lend program which is now in conference between the House and Senate.  U^Jess the Wednesday afternoon I made a trip past Green school, the first time I had; betwi up there since work started on the new buildings This building, when finished, will be one of the mpst beautiful rural schools iri the state. It is designed for service as well as looks. Mr. Kjannedy, the foreman in charge, and his men are doing a splendid job. The Freewater school, near Titanic, will hold a pie supper and program the night of June 24 to which all candidates are invited, Mrs. Willard Fite school board member, announo ed this week. Money derived from the sale of the pies will go for school supplies, Mrs. Fite said. The CCC-ID orchestra, a string band, has promised to play for the affair and Mrs. Fite urged that everybody come. .....      -�  .  'o- ICE CREAM SOCIAL - An ice cream social is plann ed by the Baptist  church for tonight. The public is invited. FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH I am deeply interested in schools. When I was a kid, I went to school in a little frame building that was freezing cold in the winter time and boiling hot in the early fall and spring. Our desks were all carved up with penknives and the blackboards were cracked and broken. It wasn't a very good school. FATHER'S DAY PROGRAM , Sunday will be Fathers' Day and it will be observed  by  a. special program at  the  First Christian churcbv , All  fathers are urged to attend. They4will sit in a special section and will receive distinguishing gifts,   it was announced. -o- BASEBALL GAMES The West Peavine's newly organized baseball team, under tft.e management o f Oliver Shirley and Rasmus Hummingbird, played the Mulberry Hol-ow team Sunday. The final score was 6-5 in favor of Pea-vine. Peavine will go to Chalk Bluff Sunday. -o- DEATH OF MR. AND MRS. HENRY COCHRAN Because of this,, my own experience, I feel that every effort should be made by the state to improve the surroundings and the facilities of "today's  school House members disagree it will ^^JtlftL^7 plai> i-- _ :_-t ij�      ^.A'u-iii__j ^orm, the town schools are ex- be a part of the final bill and will bring about the immediate increase in* wages for WPA workers in Oklahoma and other Southern states. ^-------\ Oklahoma has been classified in the Southern region for the past 8evral years. This has caused unskilled worker's to be paid as low as $21 monthly while the same class workers in the neighboring state of Kansas received $32. Senator Thomas .has vigorously protested this discrimination* to Harry Hopkins National WPA Administrator, since the practice began and last year introduced a bill |o bring about this'change. Senator Thomas said, "I feel that my recent trip to Washington "for the pul^e -of cMeriiig this amndment' and the subsequent work I did in its behalf was well worthwhile and that the WPA workers in Oklahoma will realize the benefit at ah early date. I am hopeful that the members of the House from Oklahoma will exert every effort to see that the House Conferees agree to this amendment." BALL GAME SUNDAY The newly started Stilwell baseball team will play West-ville next Sunday, June 19, it was announced this week. It will be the first game this year for the Stilwell organization. -0-r DO YOU LIKE GOOD PRIVATE   ROADS? cellent; it is the little country school that I want to help. And if I am sent to the legislature, I'll do everything I can for them. The present school law, which returns a proprortionate fund to each district in ratio to the number of students, teachers employed, etc., was first passed in the 15th legislature or four years ago. At that time it was called house bill 212 and it was largely written by a close friend of miine, Herbert L. Branan of I, Muskogee. (I managed Branan's campaign in Muskogee county.) The bill went into effect and was functioning smoothly before four of the men .now rutin ihg for state '"representative''e'v* en thought of running for that office. Frank Adair was running again that year. Remember, house bill 212 went into effect after the 15th legislature had adjourned Howard Morton, a republican was our representative at the time. Next Sunday June 19 is fath er's day. We expect to have i program in honor of the fathers of Stilwell and adjoining country. John Vaughn, president of Northeastern College, will speak at the 11:00 o'clock service. If you do not, attend church anywhere we welcome you to our services. All services of the church were well attended last Sunday. The interest is growing all the time. We expect to begin a B. Y. P. U. training school June 20. Miss Derkson, state worker, of Oklahoma City, will be with us to direct the work. Anyone will be welcome, but we especially insist that the members attend if possible. -R. H. Rust. While driving over County Commission District No. 2 you will enjoy traveling some good roads but you will probably wind up at some man's front gate and have to retrace your drive to get back to the main road. This is the! home of one of the more fortunate families. It seems to me that it would be fair that if a county commissioner is building these by-roads for some folks he .should build a road to every man's front gate, lest somebody raise the question of using public funds for private purposes. Now on the last go around the present county commissioner will probably tejl you just how you must vote in order to continue in the good graces of ''Santa Glaus". You remember that this happens every election. Didn't it happen last election? The situation is serious when honest and hard working men and women are) forced to ask for relief in order to relieve suffering at home-just asking for that which has been placed h^re for them. It is unfair to even attempt to tell these folks how they must vote. They are entitled to the same respect as any other class of voters and they are not going to be treated as if th,�(y^ were dumb driven cattle. -SAM J. STARR, Jr. Democrat candidate" County Commissioner Pd. Pol. Adv. NEXT C. OF C. MEET TO BE HELD MONDAY EVENING AT CHURCH Mrs. Eva Cochran, age 65 years died Saturday morning at four o'clock in her home south of Stilwell. Mrs. Cochran was born in Tennessee and at the age of 10 she movd with her parents to Oklahoma. She married Henry Cochran when she was 18 years of age. Henry Cochran age 68, died �1 9:30 Sunday evening less than 48 hours after the death of his wife. They both have been Christians for forty years. The 'survivors include two daughters, Mrs. T. L. Dunaway and Mrs. John Gonzoles both of Stilwell; two sons, Jim Cochran �ot Bartlesville, Joe Cochran of Stilwell. All attended the funeral. Funeral services were held in the Baptist. church at Salem tfor Mrs. Gochran Sunday after noon and Mr. Cochran Monday afternoon. Rev. Geo. Livers officiated. Burial in Salem ceme tery under directions of Roberts funeral home. up a bill and introduced it that he; believed would improve on his old bill, house bill 212. The n�lpaber of this bill is the now famous "Hotise Bill 6."- It lay-in the hopper while the school bloc quarreled among themselves and with the administration over it's own bill. During the next session, the school law came up again as it must at each session. This time there was a large "school bloc" that was going to force the appropriation of more than $14,-000,000 annually for primary and secondary aid. The bill was numbered 56, I believe, if my memory serves me correctly. It had many good features, including development of transportation, maintenance of equipment, extra pay for superintendents, etc. ELECTION HEADS NAME SEVERAL NEW OFFICERS Registration  Period 'For TM* Year Opens June 22, Closes July 1 The Stilwell Chamber of Commerce will hold its regular monthly meeting next Monday night, Joe Carson, chairman of the entertainment committee announced this week. He wants to remind all business men of the town to be present. No special events are planned, Registration dates for the he said, but there will be some Primary election this year open important committee reports. June 22 and dose July 1. Dur-Att'endance at the meetings has ing that peiiou any person who been holding up well: has  never  registered.... in the county who has-move 1 iftto an-BREAKS COLLARBONE other precinct, or who has lost Ben F. Walkingstick or West his registration certificate, may eavine, who recently returned register, from Tulsa, Okla., where he Ben C. Fletcher, Adair coun had been rehearsing in Chief ty registrar, has announced the Shurmat'ona's Ten Little Indians 25 precinct registrars who will band, had the misfortune of register voters preceding the breaking a collarbone when he primary election. The registrars fell on his shoulder. include  Stilwell N o. 1,  J. U. Phillips, Stilwell; Stilwell No. 2, Mrs. Walter Petty, Stilwell; Stilwell No. 3, C. W. Addington, Stilwell; Stilwell No. 4, Mrs. Lil-lie Pierson, Stilwell; Bunch No. NPW ClfV Hall 1� Arch Ray, Bunch; Bunch No. new vjiiy nan 2� Lynch sixkiller) stilwell; Z"*.-* ~# *w� Bunch No.3, Shelby Girdnery Masonic organisations of tins stilwell. Lee's Creek No. 1, Jake district will gather m Stilwell Holleman stilwell; Lee's Creek June 23 for a corner-stone lay- Nq 2 � B whi^horn, Stil-ing ceremony on the new city ^ Wauhillau No. 1, Mrs. Ed hall, it was announced this.week p '>% stilwell. Wauhillau No. by Herbert Williams^ secretary Guess, Stilwell; Christie Masons To Lay Cornerstone for of Flint Lodge No. 11. Masonic Cornerstone layings are impressive ceremonies and Williams invited the public at large to attend the gathering. The city hall's exterior is near ing completion and the  build No. 1, Mrs. Dora Sanders, Proctor; Christie No. 2, John Ray, Proctor; Sarbn No. 1, Jack De-vine, Baron;.Baron No. 2, Hoyt Sherley, Stilwell; Baron No. 3, J. K. Adair, Stilwell; Baron No. Mrs. Frank Mitchell,  West- ing will be ready for the corner ^eT^^flie No. 1, W. 3. stone Men have been working Fore' Westville; Westville on  the building for  several -     ---    -  � B. J. Traw of LeFlore county was the leader of the "school bloc." I interviewed Traw from time to time and he told me of much "inside trouble" in the school bloc. Herbert L. Branan was back in the legislature from Muskogee county. He, of course, was ah ardent school man but because he had not signed J. T. Daniels caucus call had not been placed on the important "education committee number one". Traw was the chairman of this committee. Branan, because of his sincere interest in schools, had drawn Of course I was sitting in the house of representative every day and knew what was going on. As Branan and Traw are both good friends of mine, suggested that they get together and work out -a bill that would be suitable to all. I recall that Traw, almost sore at his committee members, was delighted with the idea. He talked to J. T. Daniels about it and the speaker, realizing the situation was serious, immediately appointed Branan to the education committee number one. Within a few days, the committee had adopted a revised copy of Bran-an's housei bill number 6, carrying "an annual  appropriation 0 f between $12,000,000 and $13,000,000. This is the splendid bill that now is in effect and I 1 feel that I have had a part in getting it for the people for I brought the two recognized education leaders in the house, Branan and Traw. together in such a way that all friction was forgotten and some real work was accomplished. . If I am sent to the Oklahoma legislature. I shall work just as hard for the schools. I know what they need and I know how to get it for them. July 12 is the day. Cleve Bullette is the name. Thanks. No. 2, Mrs. John Roller, West* ville; Westville No. 3, Mrs. J. L. will start at 2 ?JarrsvWestville; Ballard No 1 'Mrs. Cora Kerns, Westville; Ballard  No. 2,  W. A.  Craig, Watts; Ballard No.  3, H. V. Waldroop, Watts; Chance No. 1, Clara Brown,  Westville; and ALBERTY ON TRIP        Chance No. 2, Mrs. Wyly Beav-. ,     .     .., � er, Watts. Chief of- Police>@r0ve*eAU, ?-The-coun*y election^, board, berty is in New Mexico attend- composed of Joe Russell mg a peace officers convention, chairman, Joe Brown Leslie, He plans to be away fcr about secretary, and Gorge Riddle, 10 days and was accompanied member, met Tuesday and an-by his family. nounced a corrected list of pre- months, which is a WPA pro ject. The program o'clock in the afternoon, Wil Hams said. A large  delegation from other lodges in the dis trict is expected. -:--0- CARSON  RETURNING cincf officials. The board also took bids on the printing of the county  ballots, Tuesday. The Bean Crop Special Use some of your Bean Money to catch up on the~ NEWS For a sjhort time subscriptions to the ADAIR COliPiTY DEMOCRAT WILL BE SOLD FOR ONLY SOC ONE YEAR FOR 50c HURRY! HURRY! HURRY ! Speedy Carson, former oper , - rot*,n�T, ator of a grocery store here and | corrected list follows a pardner in the Carson Chev " " rolet agency, will return to Stil well this week with his family. He has been living in New Mexico. First name is inspector, second judge, and third clerk: Ballard No. 1-Tom Morris,''W. T. Masters and Hugh Wollard all of Watts. Ballard No. 2-Fred Holland, W. A. Craig and Jess Daniels all of Watt's. Ballard No. 3-Elmer Smjth, COUNTY SCHOOL NOTES The Stilwell Saxette band will I Jl^e^d-Golda Slinks alt SKS nmm+SiaS,f�; Barori N�- i-A- G- Geesman, �T � IS if o�JJA & T. Smallen and Vena Thorn-term of school. It is directed by ton alI of westville. nLr.?"!^ ^n hnvp    Baron No. 2-^ohn Hudgins, JZoJfi �00 h*Ji1 Oscar Caldwell and J. E. Shahan not done so, should please call an of Stilwell at the county .supmntendent's    BarJn No. Vj^j.  a  akins -Sf^iSSSJf ^*&TSJ Jim Gordoii .and Albert Bran* Sf5' a??i^tlon /01LojPr,mary non all of Stilwell; State Aid for next year. Baron No ^ F If school boards, will please StuWell, Frank Mitchell, Weit^ pay all bills for this school year viUe and Alvin Cf We8tvilie. and close books by June 20 it    Chance No 1-.Br^ce We]chf ^*fe,-S!SL52S^5g�: Watts, W. C. Brown, Westville, urer time to Post lap his books y L. Snyder, Westville. nd have your school district s chance No. "2-John Coming- annual report ready for yw on dee   Watt   Tom Finley, Proc- time for the making of i your tor, Wm. Hampton, Proctor, year's estimate This would also Christie No. t A  John Rains, Christie, ?.nnualreport *� �18 ?fScf. on Jim William*. Christie. : time. This cooperation, I believe cju^^-No. 2-R. B. Barnett will tend to  ntake our school charley Corn and Walter Proc- finances  on hand  early and tor all of Proctor. Pro"JP^,     .  , . Stilwell No. 1-J. U. Phillips, The WPA Project for the new Arthur R    and A1 ene BriggB; stone school building at Baron ajj 0f stilwell has been approved in Washing-    stilwell No." 2-Walter Curtis, ton and is supposed,to start in Ray Hembree and Geo. Ritter thluea�fJutu^e- T :'.�-    V        all of Stilwell.      . The Federal Indian tuition stilwell No. 3-J. G. Ward, for the last half of the year has H. W. Burch  and Mrs. Mack been allocated to- the  county School boards should see Tom my Thompson and get their al location   for .enrichment proved. ' -G. M. Hagari, Sup't �    O--rr-^r- MARRIAGE  LICENSES A. L. Daniels, 32, Peoris, Arizona to Marie Daniels, 80 of Watts. v Dan Scott, 66, to Lula Adair, 18, both of Stilwell.   - Ross all of Stilwell. < Stilwell  No. 4-Ray Blake-. more, Sid Hill and Sadie Allen aP-1 all of Stilwell. Westville No. 1-W. W. Al-' berty, Jay Buffington and J. A, -Heston all of Westville. 1' Westville No. 2-^Jim Wlj-Hams, E. H. Winder and Paufc Hays all of Westville. " ; ;i . s Westville No. 3-rJ..I. Mar$s, Virgie Rhinfcs and Ben Grahaib1 ;�.(Continued t
                            

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