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Adair County Democrat: Thursday, June 9, 1938 - Page 1

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   Adair County Democrat (Newspaper) - June 9, 1938, Stilwell, Oklahoma                                9n� .or*;, wfel -� AID REASON IF " FERGUSON^ WEST Two of Three to Escape Sunday Reported to be Dangerous .   . ��  Men .: GOATS HAMPER FAMED BLOODHOUND Ferguson Convinced That Escapees Are Still Hiding In""" Adair County Over-crowding of Stilwell's "escape proof" jail was believed this week to have been reason that three men were successful iri a break here Sunday. The three were Elza Bowman, 30 of Indiana, Jerry Tensley, 25, Cleveland, Texas, and Chleo "Slick" Thompson, 29, of Stilwell. The break occurred at six o'clock Sunday morning and by noon Thursday the men had not been apprehended. All had long criminal records and Bowman is classified as a "dangerous" man. Because the 2ity jail is not in use, pending completion of the Suspectiirgthat h* had a '.'bad! mah" on hlB,,bands, following; the apprehension of Kedell Griffith, charged with robbery at Watts Sheriff John Ferguson wired his fingerprint classification to the FBI early this week. Hoover wired back vtjhat Griffith's name was Bill Prather and" that" he was wanted for murder in Fayetteville, West Virginia. Sheriff Ferguson is holding Prather, pending the arrival of the West Virginia Sheriff who wiredrTthat' he'wanted the man. SAMUEL A. bigby, 63, DIES AT OAK GROVE RACE HOLDS EYES �J:Cv's. changes: TRAIN SCHEDULES As Always, Oklahomans Pay More Attention to Gubernatorial Candidates Samuel A. Bigby, 03, a pioneer citizen of Adair county and a prominent Oak Grove farmer, succumbed Sunday. His death is mourned by a large group of friends and relatives. Bigby was a widely, respected citizen. A successful farmer and business man, he was considered a leader in his community.   ^ Burial was at the Oak Grove cemetery under the direction of the Roberts funeral home. Rev Wavne Bateman performed the new l^y^oifX are.'buSrites Many^Stilwell busied in the' county jail.   On' ness men, friends of the de- x----- _ -. � Saturday night, these- include many "drunks". On Sunday mornings the jail is crowded. ' In order to make room for the , -increasing number of drunks, Jailer A. A. Hart placed a number of them in cells near the men being held for other crimes. It was necessary for him to open the cell block doors in order to let, the druks out into the bull ___________f________ of the deceased, attended the funeral. HOME IMPROVEMENT Thelma Greenwood, assistant home management special-, ist, will hold a home improvement in Stilwell, June 13, starting at 10 a. m. in the district court room and  at  Westville let, tne aruKs out mw      ----, June 14, in the church, for the pen and it was at this time that, 4tH club girls and home demon-Bowman came out of his cellv stration women, fell into, line with the drunks. and marched past Hart toward the bull pen. FoutfMen Struggle IRVIN HURST HERE Irvin  Hurst,  active young candidate for state auditor, and Foiir^Men htrug^e        a    ^      newspaper man,'made Hart, ^^^^^S^WP^s speech of his~cam- -man was in the line "^auav^A_.^K...^.uj^, rn,,n,j,, man wao *�* .uv ..... ____ the other prisoners, was suddenly attacked. Bowman leaped on him, pinning his arms to his sde. Hart had time to make one ineffectual attempt to use his blackjack. Tensley and Thompson ' then rushed him, jerked the jail keys from his belt and after a strug- paign in Stilwell Tuesday nght He is opposed by Frank Carter, who has held the position numerous times, and E. B. Howard, Tulsa, a veteran politician. , BUFEINGTON WpRKING Owen Buffihgtdn of Westville ,. _TT,_ , _..,, .is making an active campaign Sr.0VL~B b�Lilto a cdl runway for the office of sheriff. During fnVhs?ammed " he& doorT shut1 the past few weeks he has met They left'at once.   -   . | After tinkering with the lock for a few minute's, Hart was J able to get the door open and | to sound the alarm. Bloodhounds were called from McAlester and a posse was gathered to pursue the men. Ted Maxwell, prison guard, was in charge of the three dogs, 'one of which was the famed "Old Boston." The dogs led the posse straight east, over Davis mountain, to the Davis spring;'Here' the trail was lost, for a herd of 100 goats, had been milling around the spring and the dogs could not again pick up the trail. Break Into Home The search continued all Sunday afternoon. Sunday night, it is believed that the three men broke into the home of Mrs. Es-sary of Maryetta, mother of Arthur Essary. While she was at church her home was robbed of six dozen eggls, a gallon of flour, matches, salt and pepper shakers, all cooked foods, four gallon buckets and a milk bucket. Officers construed this robbery to be the work of men who wanted only a small grQb stake. > They escaped back into the brush. Sheriff John Ferguson believes that they are still hiding in the woods in Adair county and still is  SE^|%)S;'i ."p;^ SPEAK: HERE SATURDAY & ,E, Richardson,of Oklajbid-�ma City will stSeak on "the1 streets of Stilwell Saturday at 2 o'clock in behalf ot Leon C. "Red? Phillips canipaign for, governor. Ricliardsoni , a law student, has an excellent loud-speaking system with plenty of good music. He will speak in Westville at four o'clock the same day. ADAIR AIR Candidate speaking There will be a candidate speaking and pie supper at the Stony. Point community building Wednesday night, June" 15 at 8 p. m. All are cordially invited arid any candidate will have the privilege of speaking. Proceeds will go for a singing school. hear the prisoner at the BAR A temperance drama called "Who Is To Blame", and vividly portraying conditions as they are Under the new. beer laWs* will be given? at the Christian |.GJbiutch,-June 16, 8 p. m., with twenty-five local characters as sjsted by Dr. Atticus Webb, of Dallas. This is a new temperance drama, copyrighted and attrac ting large audiences wherever presented, the attendance often reaching as high as 2,000. It is sponsored by and is a part of a campaign for' temperance education being conducted by the lofeal churches. drama is in the.form of a ___Wte&P^&T. E. R.4Hall will be the presiding judge, and "will conduct his court in a dignified manner, Cecil McGee will take the part of Tom Moore, on trial for the murder of a total Strang er, Walter Evans, at the "Blue Goose" dance hall. Bob Lee will prosecute the de fendant and Dr. Atticus Webb will defend him. Rev. R. H. Rust Rust will take the part of the clerk x>f court and Jeff Atker-son the part of the sheriff. The State will summon witnesses as follows: Paul Chambers as Deputy Sheriff, J. B. Cox who will serve as Coroner,- and Roy Painter who was an eyewitness. The defense will put on the; witness - stand the defendant1 himself, .and hig mother/ which partia to be taken by Mrs. Miu* jorreMcCahnari. It will 'aW^|S. f er Hans Schlitz, the beer seHer^ (Continued to page three) HEAVY BEAN 0 M Cleve Bullette Adair county's many admirers of President Roosevelt were surprised and a little hurt this week when it was announced through the newspapers that the president's son, Jimmie, would take part in the second district's congressional race. Newspaper reports have it that Jimmie Roosevelt; the president's secretary, will accompany Jack Nichols to Muskogee for the dedication Of the rebuilt federal building there and will make a speech. . The president is a widely loved man and very little criticism of him or his policies is expressed in the second congressional district of Oklahoma. The district owes him everything it has received during the last few direful years. But the people of the district feel that he should not use his vast influence in helping send back to congress a man of the general unpopu larity of Jack Nichols. They know, of course, that the,president'-needs'-men who will cooperate with;him. Many, such men are called "rubber stamps" and Jack Nichols falls into the classification^ - ' 150 Adair County Grower^Hav� An Ati&ge of ^or?^&?\ 1000; Prices, Good J. ;,M ;The;.! largest";. 'W$$mtm% bean crop in years begStt.tbrdfl toward markets this ^week as . the Rfeese ftnd Etheridie duce firm ottehed its Stilwell cleknihgc ana packing plants to 150 growers here.. Many Sequoyah county, growers also are marketing their 'heavy crop in Stilwell. The 150 contract bean growers in this county/represents an acreage of more than 1000- and a heavy yield is being harvested. Growers are finding" bean pickers scarce as the rush starts, Reese and Etaeridge, a produce firm that has marketed Adair county products for years is well equiped for the rush. Thursday a new cleaning >and packing machine was installed: and a crew of 25 men, put to work. Perry Etheridge, in active management of the concent said that the firm could pack and ship from four to five cars of beans a day. The firm also has increased its rolling stock by the purchase of a new trufck. ' .  . ; Bean growers early in the season expressed satisfaction at the price the beans were bringing this year. That market started for the farmers at 75 'cents a bushel.    .'     - ELI ELI SUCCUMBS AT HONEY HILL HOME Eli Eli, 58,"a fullblood Cherokee, died June 6 at his home in Honey Hill community and was buried there .Wednesday under the supervision jrf^the Roberts Democrat Primary July 12 George N. Hagan for Re-election as County Superintendent of Schools Of course the president's- ad visors are not familiar with condition in.'the second- district and although they know Earl Boyd Pierce, the leading candidate for congress, they are not sure that he will be a "rubber stamp". If,they knew conditions here,'and knew Pierce's qualifications for the office of congressman, although he is by no means a "rubber stamp", the president's sonywould keep his hands strictly off this race. I regret very much that Jimmie has decided to make this speech in Muskogee for, as was done in Iowa last Tuesday in the Wearin-Gillette race for the senate, he will be sternly rebuked by the people for his inters .ferrance. After', ^Jimmie had Income .out foi* Wearin, your?will remember, Gillette spurted ahead to win almost two to one.; People just don't like interfere ranee in local affair's. ,       : Dear Fiiend: You are undoubtedly looking forward to the primary election, July 12, when you wiD have an opportunity once more to go to the polls and.cast your vote for tjhe candidate whom you beUove is the best qualified and . will; The oldest child make the best county or state officer. Realizing your respon-, sibility as a citizen, you hesitate to vote for a man untilyou have obtained the facts' concerning his character, past accomplish ments, qualifications, policies, and the things for which he staids. -       "     �        > _ sevenVeara^jL, ,tny m t*4f.#a ,moved^ t�] s tainp! ^ejped the to the l'eg|8lt� mm   

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