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Adair County Democrat Newspaper Archive: December 6, 1929 - Page 1

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Publication: Adair County Democrat

Location: Stilwell, Oklahoma

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   Adair County Democrat (Newspaper) - December 6, 1929, Stilwell, Oklahoma                                THE KEAL JOB Progress cannot be built up.! on a rotten foundation! Let's Clean up and Build up Adair County 1 � !^�#^?M i  hrn; � ��-,in-. ^jy-1 urTt  u;)i.;l i   ll":ii'7,; IITtl.Iuf'i h.-tfc, irt.'U'H, .T" VOLUME NUMBER 32. HOWARD SPEAKS ?� AT MUSKOGEE Many Take Part in Soil Conservation .Program, Held at Muskogee; Tuesday..''''   ' ' MUSKOGEE, Dec. 4.-Representative citizens, farmers and, busine3 men were in attendance yesterday, at, the oil eroaion'c^lppcejhere at wfiicri .jail phrases;' of^tnetproblem were; discussed. Terracing,'* planting pasture grasses, drainage, control of roadways, and river transportation all came in for consideration. Among the speakers were those from the extension division of the Oklahoma A. & M. college, and adjoining countieB and from Muskogee. Awakening the "soil consciousness" of the people of the state was the theme of Trent. Trent declared that 9,000,000 acres or onfeVfourth.. of. the farm area of Oklahoma^ came, under ,'the direct administration*' bf the ' 'it* partment of interior, state land com- ' mission, and federal   land   bank*   A | committee which had"b_ejn, f ormjulated. 1 a short time ago at'pj^OTg^i City 'under call of the Clarence "'Roberts and He college authorities consider a 'part,, of; their duty, lay,-with: working Wj^.th^.se..forceS; "Poor land carries poor people with it. They have no carpets on the floors, no window shades on the windows and no screens on the doors or windows, no clothing to speak of. When they come to town they have no money to spend-this is the result ot soil erosion,' Trent said. "The human race depends upon the soil-all business depends upon its productiveness." After noon luncheon with the Ki-wanis- club at Hotel Severs the after-non program was resumed with the following speakers: G. E. Martin, farm engineer or extension division of A.& M. colege, Dr. I. B. Oldham, Frank Haward, Stilwell, Adair county, Bruce Henderson, Fort Gibson; and A. C. Trumbo, Muskogee realtor, W. H. McPheeters of the Portland Cement Educational institute Frank Howard, prominent farmer of. Baron, made the following speech at ^the meeting: Erosion and Mortgages From 'actual obsevatiort and -exper-ience I have learned that :bouVerosion which means gradual destruction, or eating away of the soil, is in many � instances, the foundation or starting point for the placing of a mortgage on farm land. r" .. In the development of new land where erosion is -held in check thru the workings of nature, the land is generally productive enough to be self-supporting, and for that reason farmers bf early days had no need of placing .a mortgage on their, farms. The time is about here when.Banks, Loan Companies, arid �individuals; that loan money on farm land, wilL' have their viewers and appraisers report'on the condition of the land relative to the possibility' and^probajillity V. of erosion. In my opinion the safest and most economical method to avoid land erosion is to sew all sloping land, down to permanent pasture, after. getfinjif a; CONGRESSMAN HASTINGS    jp GETS QUICK ACTION ,   1 -'- ': The light and power plant, including the manual training shop, at the Sj- . quosrah Orphan. Training School, vrtS destroyed tyy fire about ten days ag& ftm- rpt^^a^ihimediately taken jip with mef Indian Office and the siib-cttmmmeV in charge1 of the preparation of the appropriation bill for the Interior Department has favorably reported an fig the bill fori tjh'o building ot'.a '(raftmjs'sidri; line!: from' the City :ot Tahlcquah to the Training School, and for the.rebuilding of the manual trailing shop. "The total* amount reported by the Committee for this; school for the coming fiscal year is as follows: For general support and maintenance $89,375 For, pay.of superintendent, dr,ay-age, general repairs and improve ments 1 12,000 7,500 12,^9 15,^9: Commissary building, Laundry building,,including equipment; Employees, cottage, Fj^rremplpyees cottage, For transmission line and the     . rebuilding of the manual training shop, made immediately a-yailable, 22,500 �Total $163,3,75 ' .This school is for the instruction of orphan" Indian children of Oklahoma and it is the only strictly Indian br-t phan school in'Arriefica. The government can well afford to deal generous* ly with its orphan Indian wards. This school is doing a splendid work, is salvaging Indian children who have lost their parents, who are in great need of care and protection. BE INSTALLED Martin Again - Elected to Office     Worshipful Master of Flint �     Lodge. .- . of  Joe M. Lynch will bei: < master ' of ceremonies: at .the installation of new officers'.. at\ Flint: Lodgp- No.; 11 neHt Tuesday night,-according to announcement- made � after the annual election held; by the. members ; of the- Lodge Tuesday night. r W, H, Martin, who has,"-formerly servedvas" Worshipful Master, was electedflo succeed C, L. Lynch H -O. ..Yoe was elected senior warden; Harry "B/Hayman, Ju�iot-"warden: H.. Williams, secretary and James Ts Worsham; treasurer, were re-elected. ;.-Creighton McCullough and FranS; Shannon as senior and junior wardens, Lee Gore and Ed Woodruff as deaV cons, Roy Lee as Tyler, and J. G. Ward as chaplain, are appointive of-.fipers.^that .are,, retiring. .Others, will ..^'i^p^t^l^l^Vt^&s^ places'. VA 'ah eajly^date,. .... ... . r�,_ ariy kind tofti'!i; oii! ??' �tt't> 3*18 merchantr.also,,say?; .;tha,t .qustomflrs com.e,tp;bin> whentin need-o^gofldji, ��| why should be; waBf^hiai-.inon^yiiqdif vertisirig? An answer to that bqftibeeja made.. by a newspaper-, whoso/ftdye/Jis- of business where- the, owne'r^ppsflesRed that framo. of mind^ ;Tf}iR.npj?>epap�r answered,. the question,,<" jVhyj ahouM I advertise?" as follnw^: "Of^outse,, the newspaper man might say in rebuttal 'Every one in this community .knows all/that happens here, sp. wb�i's.t the use of reporting, t)iBin^sj,'ffh^t'B the use of printing a-news^jDer^*! I{,tbe cprrimurifty can get ajpngr wjUjptt�,,a newsnaper, it can- get- along wi^iouf aj nurribefc 0 ;  qvq another and thereby, eliminate, banks, ^hey can swap, their, old clothes..or iearh how td-n}a%;hdmej8p'u^,ther�f >y .greatly reducingtexpense�.and-ao>-ttipUy p^tting^'t|i"e clptiijiimv)^cbantf d^t'of buBUMSs. *, AlU'trade is baaed<;upr 'on; a- desire; tor' gobds^V^N'gceiiw^y.iB iniostly, ^an.-augn�ei(^',,4e^^l.,.''^i^�r lising Has. the : functkri of "reinindin^ people, of their, reqitir'emerito, *iiu^i its grestestrfurictiorirr^prinie i^cto^wia)! progress arid.p^qsrJerjjlji-f� th^Vcreatr lri& of new desires; therebyisjimula^ing trade and produc'tioniand.rrialiing- for the greatest ppuiblii',4egre*Jdnni B. Acorn at thej Peavine cemetery where burial wasj made. ' -:-- EUGENE HAIRSTON Stilwell Youngsters   , Are In Happy Expecfa tion. HE Council Reports; Favorably on Idea of White.!:;Way-;for>. Main.��,�<: . .Street;. '  ' ;night,i! the) contractor agreed to.: begin-'pavirigr;Divisiorit! strefettsin Stilwell befote the 15th;of December,; It is expected that the ^ machinery -wuliarrive -the � latter!* pail h^'lhis week and that work will ge't1''under way; �ej$ -veek.. v Thd/prOpdsitionii of) putting in a .WhiteBway 4tUhe>':'time-' 'tn*i^&^of financingfntjfcouldibe arrivVd^at. i''!'(:-J The financial-part is- bem'g~ worked If the kids in Stilwell haven't begun to count: the days until ChrlBtmas and the annual visit1 b� Santa" Clausi long before this,- there's something wrong; � They arn't normal.kids, or they are sick. The best thing to do in the circumstances,^ it is advised-;i�-to se your family physician and see him now. . ; No one has any misgivings as to the -physical;condition of the kids of this -1 t6wn.  At least'sb for as  the miy jbrity of them-are cortfcerned/ahd'Hit* safe wager; no matter what the odd* kre> ffiatieVery; last mother's Dn*;:;  they felt � as > though-.it ^would;be; an age!'forVthe1;ffrrie.Jto'>roii: jirbu^d for them'td rbalizethem; - ;�  ' - . Even now-j'.^ftli/^CI^t'nias,',!.5]^^. few days,.away,,tiie,ypuugstefs fie l}ke: it,will(,never. gettheroii Alif-pf(!USi;WP. the same- experiences .when we, wejje kids: It was a -inter^ab the fspitvcjajaiii^y^!^^ lug anythmg. upottT! th�      ' ?- ^he..'.yalu^jfj4�|bi' lo.^|nAnwe.^t:'-^psfln,^..They� This ipir^C^tt ^�|^|j|aiid foresight on the partfofvbm't'jcifyi officials and1 our business men is destined, to yank coming cit^ of fEajjte^Qkjaboma. There is cdnsueraole ' agitation on the 'S^>Mmk o'KlhPcfOis to get the post office' ropyed to the building vacated bj^ih^%Sit*. State yy.lui [no;coflsouaation m:vnmBapun, rh^avin^fvbf the BtrejBttf,Cthe3^isiDility of a^ white way, .arid -.other growing pains tnait the- io^^is^'expwieiieihg, most everyori^isjEalling intq,Jjn�,,wj|th the prograrn- ant] making plans for., a town for SHlwell. CHRISTIAN CHURCH 4'S itf"a. m. 4 p. m. ;i. �i30 p. m. i 7:30 p. m. S''^hafflam|ig out of  reach  quicker ^R�.a^pmising future? ,. f/Th^gnelftht of ignorance is buying td he would noi^ |wo t|f�kties just alike, ,pAy,4bex.amoujttt, owittg on the land.l s. Whmv.this aountry needs is  socks MHs%iiwi^' {jgfglPn"  many  in- WamAgiSWi 10,000 miles. ll/MjWtEMPiff1 as if paying a bill they it to folow your natural makes you crooked. The burning question of the hbur is "Who wiU get up and start the fire?" Sunday School, Morn3rig;Wcf�hiP. Junior' Endeavor, Senior/Endeavor;-Evening Worship; Subject- tSHIFTINGi .rRES,PQNSJBJLMEy . At: thelmorning service; foUowmg^the Sunday School hoUr"--we< will~hav�j a special program given by the school in honor: of the xGradle j RbU�r)Bepai;t-menfc�Next^Sunday being JRoll Day we1 are requestirife afuu attendance ot-jBJLJ�ember�atar.iH)ipTin ,ln flutaw-servance of thto,,fp^iaL�rvice,    � of^the^childreiy-of-our-land-are--ietetT �kdtlM( riclDOAIl�t ^m^iWim!^0m i�P^i)m>i yb?3(rs-Wtt� afifelH^ geph^-bu^ps sof^p ca^My^MMtfun now.  not already done sp'wey'win shol . and begin their TefteYToSanfa'join lit �Will! them -'a'nd- lehtf them att3^Qi� sistarftrW39>M.''< keep Ween 8#i on the things they -will-list in that letter. t&toi-jlriakek^o' nwhe. ;&ti�. *$m$, bappyv i<:;bA 1q tmoO  �M4laiCE-''atfi 'Every 2now'.'a  ar^gbir^giq^ | quesrionstoarid While thtrf btJtpvttsiV^fe riJ>il\>6r"," darndentji^ mm >
                            

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