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Adair County Democrat: Friday, May 3, 1929 - Page 1

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   Adair County Democrat (Newspaper) - May 3, 1929, Stilwell, Oklahoma                                THE OPENING GAME. HOOVER'S "WING." USEFUL WORK. AIRCRAFT OUTPUT. Thousands paid to see the opening game/ between the Yankees and the Red Sox. Fifty million Americans that don't know who the Yankees are and the Rex Sox are, haven't the faintest idea who Pythagoras and Thales were. They are just as happy, and Thales and Pythagoras don't care. ADAIR COUNTY'S LEADING NEWSPAPER ., -        _________�.   4 .......-------:----......     �        "       /   ..� VOLUME NUMBER 32. STILWELLj^OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, MAY 3, 1929. NUMBER 13. Baseball fans observed that President Hoover was "wild with his pitch" throwing the ball that started Washington's baseball season. (Technicians said that throwing the medicine ball had "made ine President a little strong on the Wing." "Wing" is baseball language for ^rm." Intelligent baseball nien will say to President Hoover, asfthe artist of old said to the ruler, annoyed at being excelled by him, "God forbid that you should know as much aobut this as I know." \ There is such a thing as kriowing too much about baseball. President Coolidge becomes a director in the New York Life company in place of the late Ambassador Herrick. Such a man as Mr. Coolidge could not remain idle. And he could with difficulty find work more useful than life insurance. It inculcates thrift, provides for widows and children. ross murder hearing-ends in deadlock Jurors Are Dismissed by Judge And Date Is Set for Another Trial In Slaying of Phillips. The United States, producing 4,600 airplanes in 1928, leads in aircraft output. France in 1928 built only 1440 airplanes. Great Britain sells more airplanes abroad than we do.. -- ' France, however, has five times as many fighting planes as we have. Her fighting fleet is so big it makes Great Britain very polite. FAYETTEVILLE, Ark., May 1.- After 11 hours' deliberation, a jury that heard the trial of Owen Ross on a charge of second degree murder reported to Circuit Judge Joe S. Maples at 6 o'clock Wednesday evening that it was hopelessly deadlocked, and that repeated ballots had not changed the standing of the jury. The jury was discharged, and the case reset for the October term of court. The trial of Ross occupied the entire day and night sessions of court Tuesday. The jury deliberated an hour Wednesday night and resumed its deliberations Wednesday morning, but failed to reach a verdict. Ross was being tried in connection with the fatal shooting of R. G. Phillips at Evansville recently. Phillips was killed by a shot fired by Ross at Tony Eaton, who was wounded in the fray. Ross claimed self defense at his trial Tuesday. * -Southwest American. -,-g- ' Graduation Week To Start Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon Sunday Morning Will be Followed by Three Nights of Entertainment. Harris Brings in The First Berries M. J. Harris ,who lives on Route 2 in, the Geneva community, brought the first quart of strawberries of the season to town early Monday morning in response to the DEMOCRAT'S offer of one year's free subscription for the first quart.     \ Mr. Harris is one of the outstanding farmers of his community and takes great pride in his strawberry bed. He reports prospects for a bumper crop if weather conditions continue to ' be favorable. Mr. Harris is -�to be complimented for getting to town with the first quart and we welcome him as a reader of the DEMOCRAT. fletoherWor delivers 12 new cars in month o - Local Agency   Reports   A   Record Month On Ford Sales With A New Month Starting in High HIGHEST IN CLASS France is the real airplane country, no matter what others may manufacture. Britain is catching up. We lag behind, but that will change. Miss Marguriette Webb, left, was chosen valedictorian of the graduating class of Stilwel high; Miss Webb mad cher high school courses in three and a half. Besides her excelent record in her studies, she has been active in all sebpol activities; corresponding secretary oL, the school paper, member of Peppette club and other activities. As a close second for frst honors, Miss Jewel Starr was chosen saluta-torian. Miss Starr finished her high school work in three years and took an actjve part in all community and school activities. Mfcss Starr is advertising manager and class reporter for the school paper and secretary of clubs. New Telephone Directories Out New telephone directories issued by the Stilwell Telephone company have been delivered to the office and will be distributed at an early date, according to J. W. Holt, Manager. The directory has a longer list of names than has ever before been carried in a Stilwell Telephone book before, and is well patronized by advertisers. i � The' added names to the list show that, people of Stilwell appreciate the excellent service that Mr. Holt has been rendering! "As soon as the directories are distributed we will expect the people to call by number only as it saves a great deal of time for our operators, Mr. Holt said. The directories were printed by the ADAIR COUNTY DEMOCRAT. two cases of berries sold here monday C. & E. Produce pays $5.00 a crate for First Two Crates Brought In By Bert Epperson. CLUB RALLY AT BARON A gentleman of the American Defense Society, who would only accept immigrants as much like the Puritans as possible, keeping out others, says "President Hoover doesn't know as much about immigration as some of us." Mr. Hoover knows a good deal more about immigration than the American Defense society knows. The baccalureate sermon for the Senior class at the high school auditorium Sunday morning will be the bpening program for commencement week. Prngrams are given on this page'for the Sunday service and the three other evenings of entertainment that will follow. Good programs have been worked up and good speakers have been selected for these exercises which will usher 36 high school graduates into a broader field of endeavor. This is the largest number of graduates that have ever finished here at any one time. Some years ago the class numbered 27. Twelve new Fords were delivered by the Fletcher Motor company during the month of April, according to Frank Patton, manager.    ' This establishes a record among agencies in towns of this size for one month, according to Mr. Patton. Deliveries were made to: W. A. Briggs, pickup; S. B. Welch, truck; B. A. Walkingstick, roadster; H. B. Schulte, Fordor sedan; Ray Blakemore touring; E. F. Henderson, truck; George Reid, Tudor sedan; Jeff Tin-die, roadster; Marion Gregg, pickup; Ralph Reed, Fordor sedan; Dan Smith, Fordor sedan, and James Scace water, roadster.   . A 4-H club rally had been planned for the clubs of the county for Tuesday at Baron. After it had rained extensively in the [(south end of the county Monday night, the rally was attended only by club members from the north end. A basket luncheon was served to the, more than 100 people present. A. F. Houston of the state extension department and Mrs. McPheters, food specialist of the A. & M. college, Home demonstration agent Miss Ruth Smith,  an^"t36un^?^^nlr^Ja3TOan were among those present for the meet. junior class will present play tonight Twenty-one members of   the   Junior Class will Take Part in Play At High School Tonight. Bert Epperson received a total of $17.00 for two crates of strawberries | which he sold to the C. & E. Produce company here Monday. > They paid him $5.00 a crate for the berries and made up a premium of $7 among the merchants. Mr. Epperson returned Tuesday with 10 more crates, which he also sold to the C. & E. Produce Co. Business houses which contributed toward the premium for the first crate are: C. & E. Produce, $1; First National Bank, $1; First State Bank, 50c; Leo Fellow^ Wicker Bros., Stilwell Drug Store, W. C. Lee & Co., Green Frog, Fletcer Hardware Co., Pugh-Bishop Chev. Co., C. J. Car* son, Adair County Democrat, Wor-sham Cash grocery, Crescent Drug Store, Consolidated Store, J. L. Cox, Rogers Hardware Co., Peck's Coffee Shoppe, Roberts Undertaking Parlor, Cook, & Ethridge, J. M. White, 25c each.    ' '    �  - :-^H. Stuyvesant Fish sues officials that stopped his yacht, looking for liquor, of which he had none. It was a new yacht. Mr. Fish wants to "protect the rights of yachtsmen." DEMOCRATS ARE PRONE TO    BELIEVE   "FAIRY STORIES," SAYS SPEAKER 'Vote The Ticket Straight,'   Is   The Theme of Talks at Meeting Held at Muskogee. To protect the rights of row boats aad other small craft is or ought to be, even more important, in a republic, since there are more of them. However, republic or no republic, stopping a rich man's yacht seems to create more excitement than breaking into a poor man's house and killing his wife. OCTOGENARIAN ACTS IN NEW HINES FILM Dan Mason Knew Them All "When" And Knows a Lot About Comedy, Too. Among the comedians who are supporting Johnny Hines in his new First National comedy, "Stepping Along" which is coming to the Grand Theatre next Monday and Tuesday, is Dan Mason, who has celebrated his eigthieth birthday and refuses to count any more. x "The first eighty are the hardest," Mr. Mason says, "and I refuse to think about what is yet to come." ' Mr. Mason has starred under every big Broadway manager and has created many amusing characterizations on the screen. He appeared with Johnny Hines in a number of the comedian's previous pictures, but he declares his best opportunity for putting over the kind of comedy, he likes is in "Stepping Along," a tale of New York politics and show life, featuring Mary Brian and the chorus of the '"Scandals." MUSKOGEE,Okla., April 26.-The Democrats are too prone to believe the "fairy stories" told them by republicans, said Mrs. W. L. Huff of Sapulpa, in the  principal address of the luncheon meeting of the county democratic women's club held yesterday noon at the Hotel Severs. "They tell us our candidates are ~>gies, and some of us believe it," she said. "They tell us their own candidates, even if -they do look like beasts, are fairy princes who need only the spell of election to loose them from their trance, and some democrats believe them. � "As long as there are traitors within our ranks, we can not expect to win elections." Loyalty is Need. Loyalty is the great need of the party, she declared. John ^GoodauV of Stilwell, former state senator;, declared that lack of support from some of the larger newspapers of the state had been one of the chief causes for many republican victories last November. Efficiency, integrity and economy are the three necessary attributes of all public officials, said Judge Charles E. Watts of Wagoner. J. C. Pinson of Coweta, Mrs. R. L. Fite of Tahlequah, and Judge O. H. P. Brewer all gave short talks "Vote the democratic ticket straight" was the- sense of all the talks given yesterday. stilwell schools commencement week programs are given BACCALAUREATE SERMON Sunday, May 5, 11:00 A. M. Chorus..................... "Give   Praise".......................Mciedith Processional..............................................Mrs. J. G. Ward Chorus Scripture   Reading........................................Rev.  C.  H.  Cole Prayer............,...................................Rev. J. M. Haygood Response..............,..........................................By   Choir Chorus....................."Morning- Invitation".....................Vcasie Sermon.................................................Rev. W. 1. .Broom Chorus, "My Task." Benediction...............................................Rev.  C. >1.  Cole Recessional . MEMBERS OF THE CHOIR Mesdames Joe M. Lynch, George Shannon, Jason Finch, Fred Allison, Bruce Cox, Earl Pugh, Jeff Atkcrson. Misses Malonc Scantlen, Hazel Weir, Opal Leatherwood. tJ CLASS NIGHT PROGRAM Monday, May 6, 8:00 P. M. March'.................................................Mrs. Joe M. Lynch Chorus............."Spring Wind," Ira 11 Wilson.............Senior Class Salutatory Address............................................Jewell Starr Class  History...............................................Lucille Tildcn Chords...----......"Lullaby Moon," Billie Brown.............Senior Class Class Flower..................The Rose..............____Erma Lee Waters Class Poem----','............*....................................Orvil Reid Class Prophesy....................................... .Callie  Leatherwood Soiir,-"Seniors, Farewell." (Tunc, "Raniona"; Words by Orvil Reid) Class Wall-.................................................Gladys Mitchell Valedictory Address...................................... Marguriette Webb Class Sons..........."A Song of Loug Ago," Stultz...........Senior Class COMMENCEMENT PROGRAM Tuesday, May 8, 8:00 P.M. Processional...................................';.......Mrs. Joe M.  Lynch Chorus................. ."Commencement Spnpr"................Senior Class Address................................,...,.......Mr. M. P. Hammond (^President Northeastern State Teachers College) Song-........................"Lullaby Moon".......................... Class Presentation of Diplomas..............'.....____;____:......Prof. J, G. Ward EIGHTH GRADE PROMOTION PROGRAM Thursday Evening, May 9, 1929. High School Auditorium Processional...................................................Eighth Grade' Invocation...................................... .Rev. C. H. Cole "College Cut-Ups," a three-act com edy, will be presented by the Junior class at the high school auditorium at 8 o'clock tonight. The play shows the trials, triumphs and funny ones of college life and is a roaring, rollicking piece from begin ning to end, according to those who have seen it played. � Miss Leola Paton, director, anriounc ed the following cast for the play: Frank Short, a varsity fullback, Jim Crocker; Bishful Dixon, a yell lead er, Woodrow Lahgley; Elsie Martin, a girl from the country, Pauline Humphries; Ichabod Crane, a mem ber of the faculty, Orville Curtis; Hi ram Parker, ja country Gentleman, Ray mond White; Toby Parker, his son, Oliver Shirley; Betty Parker, a co-ed with Ritzy ideas, Okie Fletcher; Vera Cruz, a movie queen, Reba Starr; Mrs. Cleo Hungerford, a boarding-house keeper, Maurine Dodgen; Miss Evelyn Van Tyne, a society queen, Beatrice Scacewater; Roberta Vinton, advertising manager, Alyene Poynor. Others taking part in th� play are: Bruce Dowell, Norman **b0d, Ruby Worley, Wallace McCullough, Minnie Sixkiler, Joy Carter, Winona Star, Russell Towry, Voyt Stiles, Ellis Hen son. Cox, Garrison Buy C. A. Worley Store J. L. Cox of the' Commercial hotel and Ed Garrison have bought the C. A. Worley store. Mr. Worley had announced a close out sale which had been in progress for more than a week when a deal �was closed for the remaining stock of merchandise. . Mr. Cox was in business in Stilwell as early as 1902 and has been here almost continuously since. Mr. Garrison owns a large apple orchard in the edge of town and does not plan to devote his entire time to the store. The new management plans an announcement for our readers next week./ WOODMEN CIRCLE CAMP ELECTS NEW OFFICERS CARSON BUYS LESLIE* STOCK AND FIXTURES LITTLEJOHN-FITZGERALD Announcement has been made of the marriage of Miss Lorraine Fitzgerald of the Horn community and Lee Lit-tlejohn of Stilwell. The ceremony was read by Rev. W. J> Towry at his home in the Starr community; Opening Chorus Salutatory....... Piano Solo...... Class. History... Class Poem..... Class Song..---- Class Advice---- Class Will...... Piano Solo...... Class Prophesy. Piano Solo..... ''A Lesson from the Flowers". ."Hail to Spring"., Valse in K Flat by. Purand... : ...'-.Eighth Grad^ . .�..'. Thelma Neeley .Ernestine Stewart .. Mildred Douglas .Lola Hogan .....Eighth Grade ..Lulu Bell Welch .;..Ruth Panter .. ..Pauline Poynor ... Jean McDowell Elizabeth Woodruff Horace and Frank Carson, who operate the. Carson Grocery, have bought the stock and fixtures of the Joe Brown Leslie store which sold at a bankruptcy sale Monday. They plan to restock the store and place a capable man in charge of the meat market and expect to open 'the store for business within a short time. - ;7 7''.:,  ; :' ' 7 CONGRESSMAN HASTINGS FAVORS APPLICATION OF IMMIGRATION ACT OF 1924 Members of the local camp of the Woodmen circle met at the home of , Mrs. Horace Carson Tuesday afternoon, where they convened in a regular session and elected new officers. The following were elected to office: : Bernice McCold, guardian; Viola Car^ son, chaplain; Pearl D. White, musician; Lois Elsey, inner sentinel; Elizabeth M. Winsor, banker; Mary L.; Carson, attendant; Mary L. Sanders, financial secretary. ' Refreshments were served. Mrs. Longtoft of Okmulgee presided over the meeting. Mrs. Mary, L. Sanders was recently elected district, chaplain on the national ticket when she at-, tended the session of a national meeting held at Oklahoma City, ............."Sparklets",........,... Presentation of Class Colors.. Pauline Hill; .'Carman Cheek, Willard Fellows, Valedictory.-.......,..................-----Okla Panter Class Song..,----...... "A Song of the Willows"......,..... .Eighth- Grade Presentation of Diplomas....'..   ..".';.....;...... v, .Prof. ,J. G./^Ward WASHINGTON, MAY 2.- W. W Hastings of Oklahoma, in an interview stated that he was opposed to the bill introduced by Congressman Goodwin, (H. R. 2038) to repeal die national origins provision of the Immigration Act of 1924.     '  ~. The statistics show that the largest number of immigrants admitted during any one year was in 1907, when 1,285,-349 were received, and beginning in 1917 legislation to restrict the number of immigrants was enacted, and further restrictions have been added from time to time until under the 1924 act the or* eration of which has been postponed from time to time, but which will go into operation on July. 1st, next, if not further postponed,, only; 150,000 immi-, grant may be admitted. > Mr. Hastings stated, that the national origin's provision of: the Act'of ;1�24 had been indorsed by the American Le gion, the' D guathesothfreaPbJingae gion, the Daughters of the Confederacy, and by practicaly every other pa| triotic society throughout the coaatry^ and that It should go(too effect tfftaqi further postponement by; rvwier**^.^^ PLEASIN FOLKS Mr. Si Perkins, Newspaperman! Jake he done found it out somptn. Find it out that folks can't be pleased. Think doin somepin what please everbody an somebody what never say  nothin before raise up on hind legs an make it war whoop.     , That way ever thing go it. Try to please everbody at once an please-no body. tall. All kick it bout somepin. Say Bolshevik. Say no good. Say all same: like it crazy mans. 11 ::y/:wl One time somebody run it for office. Say gonna do wonders for people. People he say why can't do wonders : now, cause already in office,. Office'; mans say no, not gonna do lessen lect us gain nother time; People go to oth-  er mans what rannin on.tothet side- . an say. what you gonna do.1 Gonna do wonders. Sound good, L>ct. Raise, w�/ price likker $3.00 pirvt; Bum likker;^ Make it mans' what lect mans, sor^? Say nor can "do it that. Idncl 1 _ Donno;.what say,* cause'won't vtaj| Just.hafta waitBut brt^bn^^^ Bet it we gonna get it Hj^:$�s body. Jake' hejpfHg re * H9P&JI nvd �~y. 8C   

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