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Adair County Democrat: Friday, February 8, 1929 - Page 1

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   Adair County Democrat (Newspaper) - February 8, 1929, Stilwell, Oklahoma                                The Adair County Democrat Is Thirty-one Years Old This Week IThis Weekl By Arthor Brisbane 880,000,000 HOT DOGS ONE MORE MIRACLE WILLIAM H., AGED 70 ELECTRICITY IN THE HOME Chicago packers say 880,000,000 sausages, 'commonly called "hot 'logs," were eaten last year. Properly made, well cooked, eaten at regular hours, and chewed slowly to avoid swallowing small pieces whole, the "hot dogs" are good for men. But, eaten between meals, haphazard and rapidly, Ihey contirhutc lo the 50.000,000 cases of American dvspepsia. A child in Chicago, five years old, horn without feel will he enabled lo .vail-:, run anil play by surgeons operating on the muscles of the upper leg. That is an interesting miracle, and there are many others'In modern science.Those born deaf and dumb, that never hear a sound, learn lo speak and understand the speech of others. With imagination's power, never having seen the earth or the sun or the sound of a friend's voice, they are able to understand beauty and friendship. Thai answers those, who ask: "Is Ihere really such a thing u3 a soul?" William Hohenzollern, once Emperor, is seventy. He looks well, but disillusioned, wears a full beard, mustaches no longer waxed or turned up at the point. He will celebrate by publishing a book called "My Ancestors." It could be interesting, going back to the early money-lending family of East Prussia that got its name from high interest rates. But it's hard to write impariially "-about your own people. ADAIR COUNTY'S M:vf)IN(i  NEWSPAPER VOLUME 32. PAPER PRINTED ALMOST A THIRD OF A CENTURY Established by John Patton in 1898 And Has Continued Publication Every Week Since. STILWELL, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8; 1929. The Standard-Sentinel Officelnll920 NUMBER 1 William decided that some tilings were wroi)g in (the Hohenzollern family, and blames its troubles, passion, sudden rages, bad temper, etc., on a woman. Maria Pawlowa, Russian by blood, Hohenzollern by accident of marriage. That reminds you of Adam blaming live. William says that Maria, was the "vilest villian of my fam'.ly." His predecessor, Frederick the Great, would-know better. Maria Pawlowa, because she was wild, violent, ungovernable, may have given Prussia* ruling family its genius. Use of electric machinery in the home, 'sweepers, washing machines, mangles,, fans, irons, exercising apparatus, has increased enormously the past year. L. J. Horowitz, head of Thompson & Starrest, biggest building concern, announces privately a new electric cooking stove thai will be Operated as cheaply as a gas stove, (Continued on last page Tile Adair County Democrat was established 31 years ago this week by J oh.-. Patton, a Mississippian by birth, who came here from Darda-neilc, Arkansas, in 1896. Mr. Patton established the first paper in Stilwcll in 1898 and called it the! Slilwell Standard. In 1904 1). B. Collums established the Slilwell Sentinel here, and in 1911) the two papers were consolidated into   the   Standard-Sentinel. .1. X. Campbell was publisher of the Sentinel for a while, but Patton and Collums were owners of the Standard-pt'nt'inel Iduriug ,the first years of its consolidation. About 1916 Patton owned the entire plSfct himself and Iale in 1916 a fire destroyed the office. A few issues were printed in Westville until new equipment was bought for the Standard-Sentinel. In 1920 Cassius Haywood bought the paper from Patton and operated, it until April 1, 1928, when he sold it to the East Oklahoma Publishing company, who changed the name to the Adair County Democrat. In the early years of 1900 Clarence Wagoner (J. S. Hillman?) established the Adair County Republican which was absorbed by the Standard-Sentinel in 1915. In March 1915, .1. A.." Alchley established; the Adair County Gleaner. Early in 1917, soon after the fire, John Patlon bought and installed a four-page 6-column cylinder newspaper press. In 1922 Haywood bought and installed a model 8 Linotype. Since the paper has been in charge of the East Oklahoma Publishing company numerous items fiave been added to the equipment of the shop making it up-to-date in every respect. The Democrat is the only office in the county that has a four-page newspaper press and a typesetting machine. The present Editor, Olin Perkins, took charge o{ the Democrat in May, 1928, and has been operating it since for the East Oklahoma Publishing company. Arthur Mitchell who worked for Haywood two years started with the paper again in April, 1928. The policy of the Democrat under the new management is lo boost and work for everything that is for the upbuilding and betterment of the town and county. -:--.- A lot of things lhal "might work in Russia but not. iu Uncle. Sam's domain" are working in lots of town's over-the United Slates. Jake Onionrann	 By A. CM.	 MR. ONIONRUN^JER'S NEIGHBOR Mr. Si Perkins, Newspaperman: Tother day Jake he settin in front a cabin watchin fly it snow and neighbor man he come it long and set it down by Jake. Jake and lus neighbor say howdy, once a piece and,' sol silencin. Bymeby soon nothor neighbor a Jake Onionrun-, ner come it long and set it down by long Jake and tother neighbor man. All say howdy once pcicc and set :silencin. After while li.other neighbor man come it by and sej. it down by Jake and tother neighbors. First neighbor man he spit it at cat and nolher one spit it at dog and both miss. Kirs neighbor he say it lo Jake he say "Jake, see it .where paper man lull it paper Jake he buy it car (other day." Jake he say "Yep. Got it good car but al-tmos ruin tother day when fool car he eide climb it tree. Bout got fix now." Then neighbor mans tell it Jake "one at time want/sec' it Jake ca�v Jake he take neighbor out to woodpile and take it broom aiid sweep it snow offen that car an show it to neighbor. Neighbors say it fine car and this dam snow all goin down back. So Jake lie take: it neighbors back to porch and all lake nothcr chew backlter and set it dowTf silencin gain. Neighbor name it Sam Trottindeer he say it '>"jWhat 4nam,e it ;tha.t Viind car?" Jake he..spit it at cat and miss then he say "Road Louse." Neighbor Tobiaster Q. Hogg say il "That not right kinda name for that car." .lake he wait while and ever body still silencin so he say "Hog, whal you think oughttn name it thai car'?" Hog be say "Ought name it Lizzy." Silence some more (hen eat he come it out front under porch gain and all lake nolher shol and not miss much. Then neighbor begin sayiu thing bout Jake car that Jake he don't like. One feller he say that oar got it tree speed, hither, thither and yonder. Nothor un say (Continued on last page The above view shows the Standard-Sentinel office force in 1920. Reading from left to right, the men are:   Orville Dodgen, John Patton, and D- B. Collums. MRS. HAMMONDS-RESIGNS According-  to  announcement made at Oklahoma City Th'itrs-' day, Mrs. O. O. Haramonds, confidential secretai'3r to the suspended governor, has resigned. Johnson promises to "clean upr the governor's office if the Senate acquits him of the charger-, voted against him-   The t^ali is scheduled to strat next Monday. . �     . RECORD CROWDS ATTENDJEVIVAL Rev. Cole Announces that Services Are Well Attended in Spite of Bad Weather BIGGEST SNOW IN YEARS Last Friday- night it snowed, and ; stayed snowed. As legend would | have ii the snow stayed on and ! veiled for another. It got here on f.chedule for-, two or three days. I Then Thursday it started in earn-j est. All in all, about seven inches ' of snow has wafted its way earlh-| ward a month-lale .for,.the reindeer I but-'ih:iJrc�fy,JTr;Tinfc,','-%r.'*iifa^)'U hunters and snowbailers. Long may it snow, o'er- Ihe land of (he free and the home of the brave. It is good for ihe coal dealer, but hard on the iceman. In sp'.tc of unfavorable weather, large crowds have attended Ihe Methodist revival every night this week, according io (mas. H. Cole, pastor. Hev. IILitton of Van IJuren, Ark., has been in charge of the singing and .lias  developed an   excellent choir among the older people and one for the tots. - "Interest is high, and if fair weather would prevail we would have ii record-breaking revival," Hev. Cole stated. The pastor has been doing the preaching am' is able lo hold his audiences and pill over his message. His bouyanl enthusiasm and profound conviction make his messages forceful. Prayer Meeting is held each afternoon for the ladies. These meetings arc being well attended and considerable interest is manifested, Bro. Hutlon is covering a scries of four meetings on this trip; He will go from here tc McAlister, then to Big Cabin, Okla., and from there to Marvel, Ark. He expresses himself as being well pleased with the progress lhal is being made in the work here. The' meeting will continue through next week, according   lo   present plans. i --------.......--jXl-. __...... ' TO HOLD NIGHT SCHOOL C. C. BUTTON Evangelistic Singer who is help-with the Revival at ihe Methodist Church this week and next. I McCasfand  and    Alburly.'   Surprise Man as He Repairs Busted :R!FF GETS LO CAT TAHLEQUAH DEFEATED Still in House b'v Fire, BY STILWELL \> TO 8 A. M. Galloway, teacher of vocational agriculture in the Stilwell schools, announces that' he \yill start .an evening school on dairying at the Marietta sehopl house Thursday ngihl of next week. . The school will consist of tu meetings, of two each week. An invitation is extended to everyone who is interested in dairying. The course' will include: Cost <)f production, factors; feeding, flour1 evenings,; type of cow, oik opening; marketing, one evening; herd improvement und cow lescting, one evening; bull associations, one evening; housing and equipment, ono (ven.ing; disease controL ono evening. � ��"4 After leading all the way until the last three minutes of play, Tah-lequah hhg]\ school was defeated here Wednesday night when YVor-sham shot tJie field goal which gave the visitors a 9 to 8 defeat. Despite the low score, it was a fast, exciting game. The Tigers had Holt, StilwelFs star forward, completely baffled and led 8 to 3 at the half, but failed to score after the intermission. Worsham, Trentham and O. Curtis starred for the locals, while Nussbaum, Smith and Sanders play-el well for Tahlequah. The Tigereltes "won Iheir tenth straight game of the year, beating the Stilwell girls 16 to 12. The visitors led 4 \o 2 at the half. Bennett and -Marshal "were best for Tahlc-quah, and Holt and Kyle for Stilwell.'-Muskogee. Phoenix. Last Kriday night the Pirates lost to Eufaula on the local court by a score of 20 to 10. They were holding the Eufaula team to a close score until the last half''and especially in the last quarter, but the invaders seemed to have .-gotten- their bearing and proceeded lo hit the' basket with unerring accuracy. ATTENDS FUNERAL Mr. and Mrs. .1. G. Ward went to El Dorado Springs, Mo., Afonday morning where Mrs. Ward wTas called by the death of her lather. R. N. Bannister. Mr. Bannister was 72 years old, and died Sunday, February 3, at Nevada, Mo., �whsre he was visiting at that time., Funeral services were held at El Dorado Springs Tuesday, He is. survived by one daughter, Mrs. J. G. Ward, and by one, son who lives in New York City.   -   ' Sherift Tom- McCasland and tin dersheriff Grover Alborty, acting on a hot lip, drove out lo the Leonard Slewavl Sarin near Titanic Tuesday and surprised C. C. Long as he was icpairmi.' a large still in Ihe house bv the lire. Long offered no resistance, according to McCaslamt, but simply stated that he had taken a cthance and lost. ' . The still was about a fiO-gullon capacity and made of copper. It was too large to get into the car, so it was destroyed there. About 350 yards from the house hidden in a thicket and some tree lops, was some 300 gallons of mash (Continued on last page GROWERS MEET SCHEDULED FOR i NEXT SATURDAY; Lack of Strong Grower's Organ- j ization Has Resulted in I �      Many Losses ��:ir. A call has been issued lo all friiit1 and berry growers in this end of i the county to meet at Stilwcll on; Salurady, February 9, to discuss the. plan of marketing to be used this year. "v A caW issued lor a meeting two-weeks ago did not get the response; lhal officers hoped for and so they made another' call. II is boiled lhal all growers interested in marketing their strawberries ami grapes at an advantage;, will be present, according to J. TV, Worsham of the First State Bank. "The strawberry season is almost here and no arrangements have been made for crates. We must find out at an early date just how many growers expect to ship through the association so we can make the necessary arrangements," he said. Several growers expressed themselves as pleased with the association and desire to stay with it. Still others say that if the association is not perfected in Stilwell, they will haul their grapes and berries toj Westville and ship through the as- j sociation there. ;, /j| "Stilwell is the only town in the;} Ozark fruit region that does not; have a strong cooperative marketing-1, association that is supported 100%;! by ..the,...growers ,;ind tlie -busmessj| men" according to A. M. Newsom, | agricultural specialist of the tfaivf sas City Southern Railway. Si Figures show lhal Slilwell growv I e'rs received an average of 4 cents' less per basket for their grapes last}' year than Westville growers.  The,' average for Westvile was 1(5. cents and for Stilwell 12 cents.    Whether this was due to ihe quality of the grapes or lo the meihod of market-1 ing is nor known.   ''All-grapes ship?, ped by the association were govern-; r mcnt inspected," -Worsham - said.. At a meeting at Fayctteville i�e- . .Jt2$M This- community can have anything it wauls-"tliatv'ja^j �a reason it every force and talent in this community behind the projecl and pull, together; '   

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