Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Lawton Constitiution Newspaper Archive: September 17, 1963 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Lawton Constitiution

Location: Lawton, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Lawton Constitiution (Newspaper) - September 17, 1963, Lawton, Oklahoma                                VOLUME 31 (AP) (UPI) THIRD AND A OKLA., TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 77, 18 PAGES SINGLE COPY EDITION KITTENISH MOOD. New York Gov. Nelson A. Rocke- feller cuddles one of two kittens presented him and Mrs. Rockefeller by a little girl in New York City. The child was so excited she referred to Mrs, Rockefeller as Mrs. Kennedy. The Rockefellers assured the youngster that the kittens, would "get a good home." (AP Wirephoto) Goldwater Back Each Other Birmingham's Negroes Map March Plans BIRMINGHAM, Ala. mingham Negroes incensed over he bombing deaths ol four of l.lielr children plan to inarch oh Montgomery to lay directly before Gov. George C. Wallace their feel- ing that he is to 'blame for the slayinss. At their lirsi gathering since the Sunday mor.iing dynamite blast, an estimated 1.200 Negroes look a unanimous standing vote Mon- day night lo endorse a1 march on thc stale house. The vole came after rliree in- tegrntion leaders called for non- violence and accused Wallace ol causing the racial tension that led lo the dynamiting of the Sixteenth Street Baptist church. No date for the march was set, School Attendance An afternoon funeral service for Carol Robertson, 14. one of the four sirls killed by the blast, was scheduled ot St. John's African Methodist Episcopal church. Attendance improved sharply today at West End High climbing to highest since the school was integrated and while students began a boycott, Tlic number down to -166 Monday but some observers al- (ributed the low nltendance to the Sunday violence. Enrollment is In thc other two integrated schools, attendance also improved over Monday, Ramsay High had S52 students today, compared lo 776 Monday. Graymont Elemen- tary went to 175 after falling to 127 Monday. Quiet Iii HuntsvIIle It was also quiet in Huntsville, and Tuskegee where N'e- gi-ops ai-c altending classes with j whites for the first time. Attend-' was about normal at the de- 'Eye Crosses Land Between Port Arthur HURRICANE CINDY SLAMS TEXAS COAST, COLLAPSES B.v TI1K ASSOCIATED PRKS5 Sen. Barry Goldwater said he will support Gov. Nelson ___ ........_......._ A. Rockefeller if the governor wins the Republican presi- !-segregated" school's" and nomination. Rocke- j-Huriisviiie, but white high school i I i I feller come close to a parallel' Tuskegee maintained Camerpn Hits "A If-T-V-. Backing I told the rally that mass services I I lTI6 niQn Goiawater included who runs held on a platform that "realistically, the Avenue South Baptist and positively" faces current the rally was held j problems and future opportuni-1 The three were Denise McNair Cameron colleKe'Sa963-64 enroll-'eS' IjJ- Mae Collins and ment, including both day and night I Wesley, both 14 classes, todav spiraled to stu-! Go'dwator said without qualifi- leaders here and around dents highest in thc history of cation, "Yes I when the nation called for use of more I tho college" '.asked if he would support Rockc-1 power in Birmingham, but; li.'- AlmfKlf An Anniinl 0 feller if the New Yorker wasia government source in Washing-1 tr J MimUbl fVH fMIIIUUI LiQfuOn Li. .HRIDO, _ _ ..I. doan of admissions. In Enrollment No Deaths, Injuries Occur; Rains, Dying Winds Pushing North; Refugees Start Home By KYIJ3 THOMPSON PORT ARTHUR, Tex. Hurricane Cindy col- lapsed as it struck the Gulf Coast today and slowly pushed northward with heavy rains and dying winds. One agriculture official estimated million damage to the rice crop. Damage to buildings and homes was light. Rains and high wind also damaged cotton and pecan crops. There were no dead and no storm injuries. Refugees from low points along the coast by the thous-- ands, started trickling back home. A low-lying 300-mile arc had been, ordered evacuated. The New Orleans Weather Bureau, in its final advisory at 10 a.m. said Cindy's maximum winds were 50 miks an hour near the center, 25 miles an hour under hur- ricane strength. The eye was about 25 miles west of Port Arthur. Five to ten inch rains were forecast for East Texas and west and I north Louisiana. The eye of ihe storm passed ihrouEh the tiny, evacuated town of High Island about a.m. cst. winds died as I ihe pye passed and rose again as the back side of the storm struck. Cindy swirled around the High Is- land area, a stretch of almost empty land. Sflme Windows Broken At Port Arthur and Galveston, some windows broke and power lines fell. About rwo inches oj rain 'Fence Sitter' Backs Treaty WASHINGTON (UPI) Sen. Sam J. Ervin, D-N.C., told the Senate today the nuclear test ban treaty contained military disad- vantages to the United States and should not have boon negotiated but that he will vote for it. Ervin's endorsement, .given "without grcnt raised ,to S2 the number of Crm or probable votes for ratification HURRICANE DAMAGE. Motor launches are tossed about in docking area at Galves- ton, Tex., today as Hurricane Cindy smashed into Gulf Coast area and moved n o rth with diminishing winds. (AP Wirephoto) nominated at the national conven-1ton said there was no legal basis students are enrolled in day clas-! on' ses, while 330 are registered for j Goldweter said in answer to evening courses. Monday. Sept. 23. is deadline for enrolling this se- mester. 431 Soplionwws While no figures are available from other junior colleges in the stale, Cameron officials expressed question he didn't know why Rockefeller was "reluctant" to j make a flat statement of support. I "I haven't talked to the pover- I nor in several months, Goldwaler said. The two likelv conlenders on alert confidence that Cameron'still re- the GOP nomination spoke rvfon- to put additional troops in the city National Guardsmen here. Kilted By Bucfcstiot Sheriff Melvin Bailey said two 'white teen-agers were arrested on an open charge in the'slaying ol one of two iVcgro boys shot to tor death a few hours after thc dyna- 750 Flood-Routed Guthrie families Return Home As Creek Waters Recede Arthur, where people took refuge in shelters. An- other took shelter in Galves- lon. Refineries and chemicals plants in Port Arthur operated normally of tho treaty. It needs a two- through thc blow. thirds 57 if all mem- Cindy aimed first Cameron. vote. La., but veered west. Winds up I .Ervin, previously regarded as to 40 miles an hour raked the low- i one of the key fence-sitters, criti- lying Louisiana lown, but the sea-! tixed negotiation o[ the treaty, wall contained Odes. which bans all but underground The sheriff's office said there atomic as a "complete sur- were no casualties and no one I render" lo the Soviet Union on missing in ihe storm. Only a few injuries were reported in minor automobile accidents as res- I jdents of the Cameron fled to higher ground. Winds up fo 50 miles an hour howled through Port Arthur, This was a far cry from dev- astating Hurricane Carla which the issue of on-site inspection, Siifxesis Complete Ban He insisted that the only ac- ceptable treaty would be one to outlaw all testing, willi a system of inspection to guarantee com- pliance The Russians have re- jected this approach. Ervin inoUcated it was the en- mite blast. City police said the other youth as Jailed whci shot at fleeing tains its title as the largest junior: niSnt in separate interviews college in Oklahoma. j for a television program. A further breakdown of enroll- r Tositions Modifle, _ ment figures shows that Cameron; In an interview in U.S. News roefc-fhrowing racidoni. has  mueni6 die JIIA 41, counted as full time students this 1-hc House to. President: rally. prefer any In Martin Luther King Jr. said at were forecast for Oklahoma today year. NiRhl Classes Also High i Night classes this fall also out-1 number the previous high of 507 night students in 1961. The 1961 figure removed those i students who "duplicated" 'by -be- ing enrolled in both dny and night classes. However, Paine.said the number ot duplicates this term j would still keep the figure of lolal! enrollment "at better than Charles Elkins, dean of students, said each of the four campus dor- mitories shows increases over the number of occupants 'as compared td last term, South Hull 'has the largest -num- ber of students with 86 living there, North HaU has 84, and West HaU .has 7S students. Cameron Hall, pirls dormitory, has 67 coeds liv- ing there. "The new high enrollment ex- presses confidence that people.of Southwest Oklahoma'have in Cam- .Dr, Richard presi- dent, said. Kennedy. Ihart Sl.UiHir Kndlnir -ntmn 7fi' 00 p. m. m m. ;ii, in. ?7 m. m. v- m. IK p. im. ;fc. ,m. p. .in. 7fl m...m. .9. -m. 74 7iW .m. .fiM ft, jn, '13 W> p> m. It -ft, ,m. P, m. 7n nu 1 Tuhllc .Co.) i'. Weather cloudy and -little -temper- this through .Wednesday. High.today .-'low-tonight 69. night 58, high I'Monday 11 reading 74, .02 rain. He said Wallace "had allowed himself to defy the .law of the land and to deal with Negro citi- zens in Alabama as if they didn't live in thc The governor declined comment on the proposed .march on the state capitol and. on King's, accu-r sation. He had said earlier lie de- plored the bombing the perpetrators would be caught They have not been caught granted their first holiday of the j Neither, have the persons who. year Friday when1 the campus is staged other bombings-in the taken over oy Comanche county' teachers. Several nundred educators are County Teachers To Meet Friday Cameron college'Students will be expected Cameron to aitend the .and, Comanche ajinual county Education association workshop, scheduled to begin -at a.m. A new code of ethics adopted by the OEA "will be dis- cussed. Guest! speaker' lor the one-day workshop .is OEA executive secretary. Dr.. .Richard 'Burch; Cameron president, will welcome the teach- ers -to -the- campus.- and-Mayor Wayne'Gilley will give a "welcome address. Lawton city school teachers-will not attend the svorkshbp .as .-they held a similar workshop before'the start-of .the- new-term -earlier this month. Negroes Integrate Baptist Ufliyersity -Ne- Centered eer desgre- gation :of .Baptist; Initittttion 'reported M9nday [students registered [or .classes orientatioa.' years. FBI bomb experts .continued to silt1 through evidence -.at the church for clues. .Another .investigation. Is. .under. r.ic OL i Cool Readings Will Continue Cool vtemperatureg and. the chance of icattei'isd tbundershow- ers- were .predicted today lor Law- ton -and Oklahoma. A mere .02 ''inch of rainfall was re- corded Weather Bureau call- ed for 'partly .cloudy through Wednesday with 'little tem- perature 'Change. High "today, will be. about Also, fcatleied- thunderibowerx and showeri are expectcdvthrouiii Wednesday, pi'edozulnantjy.-.in the eastern portioo of ;touthwert Okla- homa. ,Low last ;niEht in tawton'.1 was' .68 j abcl'the CoDstitutioD-Press and in east tonight. The weather bureau said some local- ly heavy rain i's .likely in south- eastern Oklalwma tonight and Wednesday. temperatures Will Bring Rains TULSA (AD Hurriouhe Cin- dy will .bring cloudlncNS nornc mln to Oklnhonia, tins .U. S: Weather Rurcnu today. Arlraiisa.1 will feel more nf the Inland movement Uinn. Oklahoma. will, the burcnu but south- caxtcrn and extreme Oklahoma could fct moderate or heavier ralnN. air stream moving in from the the rains. .Forecasters said it was the same stream of air that had spawned Hurri- cane Cindy. Flood victims took' shelter in i developing power of Cindy. Many Banner Elementary school and I men stuck to thtir jobs at sea. half, a dozen churches during the Between five and 10 shrimp struck thc Texas coast two years- dorscment of the treaty bv the and one week ago today, killing joint Chiefs of Staff that caused at least 17 persons and leaving him to support the pact He said damage irr the h-jndreds of mil- he would vote against it "with. lions of dollars. Thousands Flee Inland Thousands of coastal residents had fled inland before the swift- conlinuedj Heavy rains moved across a with .highs expected to range from I wide area of "Oklahoma.'Monday. 76 to 86. I The weather bureau blamed '.an Peeon Grove Profesf T 7 C'X To Lhqnge bite tempeiatjUe chart showed that readings rcmalaed at a steady 69 degrees from 12 mkliiighl unnl S .a.m. -this znptnlng nine itraijfht iioori. Law tonight wW be Jiigh to- morrow .Property owners, .from Pecan Grove addition today, protested, a plan .'to locate a zoo and children's fairyland near 'their homes and and 'itf appeared'.' the .city will .have to look .elsewhere for a sile for the.proposed'facility. 'Mayor Gilley, who said he; was .opposed to. the' Pecan Grove -site after-'hearing ob- jections from the .referred to'tJie. council's park committee. action occurred.at a.regular weekly city, council 'meeting which was'picketed iyi'JJegro. demons tra- torg: .end. to all The adult marched peaceably, carrying anti-segiegahon signs, flong- thc sidewalk on Fourth in .the.new Negro have asked the council to_ enact ordinances to, makf segregation' unlawful The council worked on racial mat-1" lerc through a citizens committee composed of Negro and "white lead- en, but no ordinances have been proposed In connection _with the zoo acd fairyland proposal, the city park- board met last weekjwithjthe .may- or and one councilman and rec- ommentled the "five-acre park site" along The by the president of Downtown 'Jfl1 wanis. cluti, .'whose' members have agreed tp'organize: a' zoological.so- ciety'...and...construct'the. iacilities over- period: -v: jri.'P.ecan Grove .addition said the location of a 200 a traf- .fic problem which be.. to '.school ;children, and would.'not be In keep- Jng .wjth. the .ot.ad1 V.-'- asked bon to be publicised during the pait few days to give i em1 dents an opportunity to expreti "their 'Councilman Blunt Zorger, chahv man ot the councll'i park commit- tee, said the group would meet wilh the park boardvto preient Uiie' objections 'made by owners In other council, open- ed bids lor -ol two new lire pumper units and a 75- footiaerlal ladder truck, approved the, pl't devetonment ol tbt COGNCII. night. 'Banner Principal Zelmer Logstron said 76 persons spent all or part of the night in the I school building. The evacuees ,wcrc generally smiling and in good spirits despite damage to their homes and heavy .loss ot property. One young man and his 14-year- old We arrived at a shelter carrying a single young man's guitar. Jo Martha HamiU, secretary oi the Logan county-Red .Cross, unit, boats rode out the storm off Gal- veston. Twenty-six men were battened down on an oil rig off the Lou- isiana coatf. Another 40 were on a barge off Cameron, La. Eight men were on a tust having en- gine trouble off Galveston. One shrimp boat was unrepovted off Galveston. Tides rose almost five feet above normal. Cindy's hjg-hest winds were SO mile gusts. Gal- veston recorded 7'J mJJe-an-hour winds during the night, These said 25 Red Cross workers; were I dropped to 35 miles an hour. busy in Lhe area. Hard Job Ahead "But the hard job-Is just get-' ting she said, referring to thc business of aiding families, household furnishings were ruined or damaged. Twenty-five national guardsmen also were on duty in thc area, as- sisting, flood victims and guard- ing property. By, mid-morning some -stores along Noble Street, center of the flood .area, were cleaning, up and preparing to' open. for business. The red .up shop in tlie'dry.-Monday night and direct- ed1 the moving.' operations.' Two schools-on-the ;.west' side were dis- missed. t.' Highway Closed 'S. H. 33 was- closed in -Guthrie, .began Travel on! other; routes in. the 'area wns vhainpered. .When, .the; began '.nearing flood stage, civil defense sirens, .waniing residents .to to .evacuate.. The flood came as ao suvpnse Said: one: "It's almost an annual-event" Other, .flooding took, place in northern- and; north-ccnlral. Okla- homa ..Monday; isolating some (arm houses El Reno caught five' Inches ot rain In the deluge and US' 86 was blocked foe a short- while. v t Overnight lows ranged irom 67 at Clinton-Sherman Air Force Base, Guymon and .Gage to TO at McAlester Highs, Monday went irom -T8 and City to IT at Guymoo. l Three shrimp boats oft Galves- ton had radioed the Coast Guard for aid, but none was in imme- diate danger. In storm-wise -Galveston, 600 residents into Stephen F. Austin Junior High school and an- other 270 went to George Wash- ington Carver High. Most boatded up their homes. At Port Bolivar, 300 -persons took shelter, 475 others went to out hesitation" if the chiefs had not agreed to back it in spite of what the senator called military disadvantages. Ervin said his treaty endorse- ment was "the most difficult de- cision I have had. 10 make since coming to the Senate nine years ago.'' He made his decision known as Sen. Stuart Symington, the nalicn's first Air Force secre- tary, defended, the pact on one of: its most debated abil- ity of U.S. missile sites to sur- vive a nuclear attack. He said he is confident that the Russians do not know any more about such vulnerabilities than the Unit- ed States. Seek Vole Friday Senate leaders hope to bring the treaty to a vote by Friday. Democratic Leader Mike Mans- field; Mont., reasserted this tar- jet today to newsmen after the weekly White House legislativa conference. Mansfield said he anticipated votes this week on proposed res- ervations and "understandings" and if a final vote is not at- tained on the trea.ty itself, then it will come "perhaps next week." itr...... HIT. Arrow-indicates area Hur> ricane Cindy hit Gutf-Coast today between Port Arthur and (AP Map)   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication