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Ada Weekly News: Thursday, March 27, 1969 - Page 5

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   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - March 27, 1969, Ada, Oklahoma                               Ada, Oklahoma, Thursday, March THE ADA WEEKLY NEWS Page 3 (Kountry KornerJ At certain times, especially when unexpected com- pany arrives just in time for a meal, it would be practi- cal for the housewife or homemaker to have a delicious recipe "down pat" so she will be able to prepare some- thing extra special for the unexpected company, with- out dragging out the old cook book. The following recipes are easy to become familiar with and will appeal to the taste buds of anyone. Soon you will have the recipes memorized and can prepare them at a moment's notice. POTATO-TUNA BAKE 2 (7 oz.) cans tuna, chunk style 3 (2Vi oz.) cans shoestring potatoes 1 (14% oz.) can evaporated milk 1 (lOVi oz.) can cream mushroom soup 1 (3 oz.) can mushroom pieces Around The County I Indians Chase Him Off, He Goes Back Missionary A Stubborn Pel law] 1 (4 oz.) can pimientos chopped Dump all ingredients into a greased 2 qt. casserole and mix. Bake in moderate oven (375 degrees) about 45 minutes. Makes 6 to 8 servings. For variation, you may substitute 1 (1 lb.) can salmon for the tuna. To complete the menu have a buttered green vege- table, like peas, fruit salad, cookies and milk to drink. For company meal, change the salad to lettuce dressed with sour cream, sugar and vinegar, mixed. Omit cookies; make biscuit-type sliortcake and fix strawberries while main dish bakes. (Shortcake bakes while you eat first course.) MACARONI-MEAT BALL SOUFFLE ALLEN By EUNICE ISAACS Mrs. Fred Nickel! was hostess 'M in her home Sunday to a birth-il day dinner honoring her moth- !lj er, -Mrs. Albert Johnson. ifj Present to enjoy the were Mr. and 'Mrs. Marland is Johnson, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Ip Nickell and children, Mr. and ill Mrs. Veston Coins, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Ni Mr. and Mrs. Doyle McMeans, Oklahoma Ci- ty, the honoree and herhusband, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Johnson, g and the hostess and family, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Nickell and chil- dren. The First Baptist Church are '5 having a revival begin- j ning March 23. Services each g evening begin at p.m. The m Rev. Jerry Wells is the evange- g list. The Rev. Joe Howry is pas- 1 tor. Fred Taylor is music direc- 2 c. elbow macaroni (7 to 8 oz. pkg.) 2 c. milk, scalded 3 Tblsp. butter or mar- garine 1 c. grated or shredded sharp process cheese 1 Tblsp. minced onion tsp. salt Vs tsp. pepper 3 eggs, separated 3 c. lightly packed bread crumbs soft Cook macaroni as directed on package, using 8 c. boil- ing water and 1 Tblsp. salt. Cook until macaroni is ten- der. Drain. Combine milk, butter, cheese, onion, salt and pepper. Stir to melt cheese. Beat whites until stiff but not dry. Then beat yolks thoroughly. Add gradually to hot milk, stirring constant- ly. Add bread crumbs. Mix well. Remove from heat. Fold into egg whites. Fill bottom of well greased 2 at. casserole with half of macaroni. Pour in half of milk-egg sauce. Add half of meat balls (Recipe follows) Add remaining macaroni and sauce. Arrange remain- ing meat balls over top. Place casserole in shallow pan. Set on lower rack in oven. Add 1" boiling water to pan. Bake in moderate oven (375 degrees) 50 to 60 minutes, until knife comes out clean. Makes 6 to 8 servings. COMPANY MEAT BALLS The Rev. V. E. Miller, pastor of the Assembly of God Church also is having a revival begin- ning March 23. The Rev. T. A. McLarty, Drcatur, Tex., will be the evangelist. Mrs. A. B. Kidwell. accom- _ panied her nephew and wife, Mr. 1 and Mrs. Wsndell Hunt, Coal- gate, to Dallas, Tex., Friday. Mrs. KIdwell's brother, Walker Hunt, died Wednesday in a Dal- las hospital. By W. L. KNICKMEYER When the Rev. Claudio Iglesias says the San Bias Indians of Panama are fearful and distrustful of strangers, he knows what he's talking about. When he went back there as a missionary after some years of study in the States, he got chased out of his own home village. It didn't stop him, though. He and his wife man- aged to establish themselves in another place, and stayed there to work with his people for 15 years from 1949 to 1964. The Rev. Iglesias, now established as Baptist chaplain at Chilocco Indian School (afNewkirk, north of Ponca has been conducting revival services at the Ada First Indian Baptist Church, 16th and Constant. And doing a good deal of visiting around, on the side, with the Rev. H. L. Baker, pastor of the local church. On at least two occasions, too, he's spoken to Spanish classes at Ada High School though ap- parently his Spanish didn't go over so well. "Well, you he grins. "Classroom Spanish it's different." Iglesias is himself a Kuna Indian (or San Bias: the terms, he observes, are practically interchange- able, with San Bias emphasizing, the geographical aspect and Kuna the He came to the United States as a small boy aged 11 grew up in an orphan home, attended Bacone College in Oklahoma, Nyack Missionary College in New York and the University of Red- Mrs, Ollie Hall returned home s from Valley View Hospital. Weekend guests of Mrs. Ollie Hall were her daughter and hus- band, Mr. and Mrs. Wat- son, Duncan, and Mrs. Pearl Harisffeld, McAlestar. Mrs. C.-rrie Blevins returned home Tuesday after visiting her sister, Mrs. Alice Evans, Ada. Mrs. Tsnnie Kemp visited Tue-day night in Ada with Mrs. R. Overton. "2 lb. ground beef lb. ground lean pork 1 egg, slightly beaten c. fine day-old bread crumbs c. milk 1 tsp. salt Vs tsp. white pepper 2 tsp. minced onion 2 Tblsp. fat or oil Combine all ingredients except fat. Mix thoroughly. Shape into 12 to 14 balls, about IVfe" in diameter. Heat fat in skillet over medium heat. Lightly brown meat balls. Cook 20 to 30 minutes; remove from pan. Individuality Worth Told' In Skit, Talk The Byng Chapter of the Fu- ture Homemakers of America held its monthly meeting Mon- day. Thelma Dellinger, voca- tional home economic instruct- FHA Members, Mothers Enjoy Program-Tea A tea for mothers and daugh- ters, sponsored by the Byng High School chapter of the Future Homemakers of Ameri- or, directed the group. ca was held in the Neighbor- The freshman, section 11, e at ti u.in. i nin-i group was in charge of the pro-1 yolvi both mothers and gram, with Debbie Smith pro-1 dhte provided the pro- gram chairman. The March gram theme Counts." is "Individuality The devotional was given by Mary Jo Barnes, Sherry Baird, Debra Summers and Beverly Bullard. Bill Pevehouse, the school counselor, spoke to the girls on "Being showed An Individual." He the contrast between crowd influence upon individ- Those attending were Laonia Deaton, Debra Deaton, Mozelle Schornick, Pat Schornick, Lor aine Patterson, Janis Patter son, Josephine Ferry, Debra Ferry, Lorice Johnston, Tandj Johnston, Mintha Jones, Jane Jones, Pat Taylor, Suzie Taylor, Mary Lou Gardner, Gail Johns, Cind; crowd intiuence upon mama- Gardner Ina Henson Lois Gen uals, and one's own responsibil- t Virginia Tilley, Ouida nrtrt In iVlOW OOlTjne _ J _s ___- J _ ity to God and to themselves. A skit was presented titled, "No Sense of Responsibility." Linda Geiger was in charge of the program. The characters in the play were: Alexis Lewis, Kathelene Oakes, Joni Shope, Jeneay Sanders and Letha Mc- Connell. Following the skit, the girls participated in some relaxers, led by Dorothy Green, song- leader, and Jeneay Sanders. Beverly Bullard accompanied them on the piano. Stokes, Sammie Koller, Lavena Ortega, Debbie Ortega, Laquitta Curry, Sherri Curry Marie Allen, Norma Jeai Stokes, Teresa Allen, Mary Ji Whitwell, Lisa Whitwell, Er nestene Eubank, Teena Ev 3ank. Geneva Caruthers, Pati Caruthers, Sandy Caruthers Ruby Pittman, Ann Pittman, Mildred Rich ardson. Betty Richardson, .Lea lha McConnell, Mrs. Faye Scar brough, Glenda Scarbrough an Thelma Dellinger, F. H. A. at ADA LIVESTOCK AUCTION Receipts Tuesday were 477. Packer cows were steady; bulls and'fat calves, 50 cents higher; heavy stocker and feeder cat- tle higher; light stackers to lower. Slaughter heifers, 24-26.50; slaughter cows, canners and cutters, 14-19.50; slaughter cows, utility and commercial, 19.50-21.70; slaughter bulls, 22- 25.60; slaughter calves, 25-27; stock steers, 28.50-33; stock heifers, 25.50-27.50; stock steer calves, 30-43.25; stock heifer calves, 26-33; dairy 24- 28; stock cows, 20-25; cows and calves, 200-250. MARRIAGES Billy Gene Alexander, Ada to Rosetta Coker Cully, Okla homa City. Jack S. Galley, Oklahom City, to Molly M. Galley, Mid west City. Frankie Gene Nasl viile, Term., to Susan Carlen Lung, Seminole. Ray D. Cathey, Allen, to L: Dora K. Cathey, Sherman, Te: Lee Delozier, Ada, to Joyc Elaine Shatswell, Ada. Illinois has local govern ment units, more than any oth state in the nation. Mrs. R. C. Isaacs, Mrs. L. S. oss and Mrs Effie Turner vis- m ed Friday with Mrs. Ollie and Mrs. John Smallfield in an Francis Nursing Home in da. Thursday dinner guests of Mr. nd Mrs. T. L. Smith were their -s, Mrs. John Com- I and children, Seminole, and rs. Ronnie Inman, Poteau. Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Kraettli ansacted business in Oklaho- ia Ciiy 7 "jnday. Recent guests of Mr. and Mrs. raettli were his daughter and usband, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne "ammonds, Duncan. Mr. and Mrs. Calvin Boyd and ue and Judy Lancaster, Fran- is, were Friday night guests of he B-yd's daughter and family, ilr. and Mrs. Joe Bennett, Mid- est City. Friday guests of Mr. and Mrs. irnold Bryant were M-3. Bry- mt's brother and wife, Mr. and ,lrs. B. 0. Cranford, Ada. Friday guests of Mrs. Harry Hersler and Mrs. Leafy Duram vere Mrs. C. M. Means, Ada. lands in California (where he took his bachelor's Then he became interested in Bible translation and returned to Oklahoma to study linguistics at the University of Oklahoma. It was at OU that he met his wife, a girl from Minnesota who had put in some time in Mexico working with Indian tribes there. Together, they went back to Panama in 1949, as "independent missionaries." The San Bias area, on the northern or Atlantic coast of Panama, was closed to Protestant work, Iglesias notes. "So we bootlegged the Gospel." It was a touchy business, apparently. The Kuna Indians are an island .people, inhabiting about 50 of the 350 islands that stretch along the coast of their reservation. (It's a constitutional reservation, established by the Republic of Panama.) They're cut off from what we think of as civiliza- tion by water and jungle. As a result, Iglesias says, they're confirmed isolationists. "They don't want to be bothered. Their attitude is, 'We're getting along all right. Go away and let us alone.'" Add the distrust of strangers "They fear edu- cation, they fear modern medicine, they fear any kind of innovation" and the fact that as Protes- tants Iglesias and his wife weren't supposed to be there, anyway. g (Continued on 8) g JERRY WALKER Walker Moves Up In Yankee Farm System I Jerry Walker, Ada, has been l! assigned as manager of the I1 Manchester, N.H., baseball club 1 in the AA Eastern League. The former Baltimore Oriol pitcher and all-state high schoo player from Byng assumed his duties this week. 1 Surtax 'Price' Spending Slice? 1 WASHINGTON (AP) Sen-1 jj ate Majority Leader Mike 1 Mansfield says Congress should I insist on a second big spending cut as its price for extending the 10 per charge. And the cent income tax sur- Senate's Democrat spokesman said Congress should decide where the cuts are last year when it left most of the trim- ming to former President John son. It was announced Tuesday that President Nixon would ask Congress today for a year's ex- tension of the surtax. His re- quest is expected to win approv- al, but, as with most taxes, nei- ther quickly nor cheerfully. DIVORCES Barbara Pearce from James Pearce. Unanimous! One thing you can say jj about Atoka when it s comes to the city's g schools, everybody's for g them. p At least, that's the in- jj- dication from Tuesday's election. m Not a single vote was s cast against any of the jf millage levies. B The vote on the 10-mill H local support levy was t 107-0. On the building g fund and emergency lev- g ies (both five the g count was 108-0. g And, incumbent board B member Harvey Capps H was unopposed for re-elec- tion. Housing's Topic For Saturday Meeting In Ada "Housing For Better Living in Later will be dis- cussed at a meeting Saturday at p.m. in the Aldridge Hotel ballroom, 12th and S. Broadway. The program is planned by the Ada Housing Authority and. the OSU Extension Center. "The future belongs to those who dare to according to Dr. Thomas S. Stillwater, who will speak on the subject "So You Are Going. To Move." He is Oklahoma State University's family life specialist. Walker was manager of th Binghamton, N.Y., club las year in his first season as manager in the New Yor Yankee organization. Walker and his family resid at 2015 Collins Blvd. during th off-season. The 30-year-old countian wi debut as a AA manager Apr 19- Lucille Clark, Stillwater, ex-' His family will join him in tension specialist in housing New Hampshire soon. Walker is a son of Mr. and Mrs. 0. A. Walker, Byng. and equipment, will give ideas on making the home more com- fortable and enjoyable in later years. _ 1 The Rev. Claudio Iglesias is shown here with a couple g 1 of examples of Kuna Indian handiwork: a fetish carved g g of kind of mahogany that is reputed to "cure every- g S thing" and blouse exhibiting the beautiful applique s 1 work done by women of the tribe. (Staff Photo) g Sunday dinner guests of Air. and Mrs. Earl Legg were Leifch g, San Jose, Calif., Mr. and rfrs. Trellis Legg and Ronnie, Duncan, and Mrs. Clan Gard- ner and son. js ..era her daughter, Mrs. Estalene Thomas, Don Dusten and Mrs. Donna Mun- ger and Curtis, Oklahoma City. Weekend guests of Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Mead were their daughter and hi.-" and, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Budd, Mr. and Mrs. Robert Trimmer, Coffeyville, Kan., Mrs. Jaje Story, Oklaho- ma City, and Mrs. Joe Severs, Ada, visited the Meads Thurs- day Mrs. Louise Cooley, Broken Arrow, delivered the sermon at the Church of God Sunday. home Saturday after five months. Mrs. Price visited Mr. and M s. L. L. Vienneau, Alex- andra, T M-. and "-S. Tom- my Horn, St. Antelo, Tex.; Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Doverspike, Dal- as, and Mr. and- Mrs. 0. T Rushuv "'id, Tex. YTeekend guest of Mrs. Lela was her sister, Mrs. Jake Story, Oklahoma City. Weskend guest of Mr. and Mrs. Royal Sanders were their daughter and family; Mr. and Mfs. id Hayes and chil- dren, Parson, Kan. Wednesday guests of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Walters were Mr. and Mrs. Less Palmer, Henryet- Mrs. Myrtle Yoakum was ac- companied home Fri." from Oklahoma City by her daughter, Mrs. Louis Franks. Mrs. urn had visited in the city three weeks. Visiting Mr. and Mrs. Lois Rinehart are their daughter, (Continued on Page Four) Sunday dinner guests of Mrs. Effie Turner ware her daughter and Mr. and Mrs. Ben Iker, and Mrs. Bob Brew- er and baby and Mr. and Mrs. Mike all of Del City. Allen residents attending the Eire' Sunday at the Free Will Baptist Church of Non were Mrs. Luther West, Mrs. Hugh Brin- son, Mrs. Nora Douglas, Mrs. S. A. Bryf..it, Mrs. Elsie Eu- banks, Mrs. Ruby Strickland, Mrs. Odis Vinson and Mrs. Eth- el Mrs. Selma Price returnee Pecan Graft Wood All of the improved and hy- brid varieties of pecan re- commended for So. Central Oklahoma; also winter hardy English walnut. Guaranteed Custom Grafting Service Available V. Hooker 941 Susan Ave., Ada 332-7155 YOU CAN HAVE AN AUTOMATIC SAVINGS ACCOUNT AT FIRST NATIONAL Weekend guests of Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Russell were Mr. and Mrs. John Malone, Mrs. Cora M-' Dallas, Tex., and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Russell, Oklahoma City. Mr. am' Mfs. H. C. Nickells received a call from their daugh- ter, Mrs. Eval Palmer, Antioch, Calif., recently. Mike E.itt, Norman, visited Friday night with his grar.-par- ents; Mr. and Mrs. Bill Jestes, and "p-ney Evett, who is a pa- tient in General Hospital in Hold- enville. Sunday guests of Mrs. Clara DIAMONDS... JEWELRY FAMOUS WATCH K- HAMILTON BULOVA [LOIN LONGINiS WITTNAUER QUALITY DIAMONDS USE YOUR CREDIT WE GIVE S H GREEN STAMPS It's as simple as A-B-C. Just tell us how much you want to save each month and we'll automatically transfer it from your checking account to your savings ac- count. You'll never have to bother. You'll never miss it. We'll attend to all the de- tails.' You can just sit back and watch your savings grow and earn regular inter- est compounded quarterly. COMPOUNDED QUARTERLY PAID ON ALL SAVINGS ACCOUNTS Gem Jewelers "SOUTHERN OKLAHOMA'S FINEST AND LARGEST" 117 W. 331-M77 Thank You And Have a Nice Day First COMPANY ADA, OKLAHOMA MEMBER F.D.I.C.   

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