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Ada Weekly News Newspaper Archive: October 6, 1960 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Weekly News

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   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - October 6, 1960, Ada, Oklahoma                             The Paper With PERSONALITY Biggest Reading Buy in Oklahoma By Mail in Pontotoc And Adjoining Counties Single Copy 10 Cents Only Per Year Combined With The Ada Times-Democrat 60TH YEAR 10 Pages ADA, OKLAHOMA THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1960 NO. 26 Quarter Horse Trainer On Echo Ranch Recalls Interesting Years Of Racing By ERIC ALLEN It was an Indian Summer day in 1920. The big horse race at the county fair in Beaver City, Oklahoma was about to start. A kid of twelve sat astride a horse leading the field. There wasn't any doubt about it. Big Dan was going to win. But the yells of the crowd in- creased, building up to the verge of panic. There, moving up on Big aC'n9 horsc and called Big Dan. waiting with was the ed breath for the sound of the lanK as a greyhound and startin gun 'traveling like a streak of light- Big Dan was restless, kid on Big Dan clamped with head thrown high and his ih'3 and ahead II look- nostrils flaring, the muscles llke ll was to lit for his hindquarters bunching and itat worse' his front hooves cat-dancing Hnrse Trainer vously against the summer-dry I Tne kid in the saddle on Big turf of the track. [Can that day was Tom Stevens, The kid was nerouvs too. trainer on the Echo Quarter held tight reins on Big Dan, feel- Horse Ranch south of Ada. ing the horse's hide slithering un- der the saddle like a catamount's skin every time some man in the "I've taken part in hundreds of horse races in my Stevens said. "But I won't ever forget that crowd gave forth with an eager !race at llle Beaver City Fair- yell. S grounds. It was the first race I Horses moved up on either side, jever and. .well, Big some of them rearing, breaking, i Can boiling, having to be pulled in and! Tom Stevens, a lean-faced, circled and brought back to posi-jalert man in hjs early fifites, lions again. There weren't any is recognized in quarter horse cir- slarting gates; just a long twine C'ES today as one of the best siring stretched between t w o trainers in the whole Southwest. men, and another man waiting with a cocked pistol. Neck and Neck Suddenly the gun boomed and He has been training racing quar- ter horses for Echo Ranch about six years, and before then he trained stock for well-known fi- the horses were off surging !gures in the entertainment world, apainst the Iwine string barrier. Audie Murphy and Dale Robert- The suspense that had been build- son- up within the kid all day long "Guess you could say I've train- release in a surge of explo-jec' some the best match horses c action. He was oblivious to I ever seen Stevens ad- 1 thunder of hoofbeats, the' mitted. "World champions like iking of saddle leather and the j Vannevar. Barbarell. Bright Eyes arJunVJh. rider were caught in good form on a trial si ausrarfc-jsifijfssrzrzr.'ssi s W" hp" n" Vannevar has set four world records in race, held across the country? known among race horse fanciers as a top trainer, has been working strictly with quarter c U o i_ nil racing STOCK ,1 uu ct u ici aiut ui Lllc ivJU rramer en Echo Ranch tor the past six years. See other pictures inside. (Photo by G. gradually fading. Big Dan Bis Dan was running strong, w- nave ner nere on Echo row. and the out-thrust muzzles of hor-jSnt' hasn't started but 19 times, either side of the kid she llas already won was; (Continued on page two) In PontotQC County South Of Ada on state 99 K Swinging Into Full Stride This Week The October 15 date for since they were colts by one of the Hal'vest'ng of Pontotoc County's still pull lhe vines, stack them loading y w q horses since the early 1940's. See other pictures inside. (Photo by Jack Burglars Get Away With Haul At Allen r ,i u, ii i ,Gm r g, ehe peanuts on wagons their peanut crop have furnished 351 separate items early Wednes- the third annual sale sponsored nation's best trainers Tom Ste- Peanuts w'as going full blast around poles and start threshing from the shocks and unloading i funds for the new house they're I day morning in a robbery at the by the East Central Quarter Horse j vens. who has been training this week, with combining weeks later, j into the thresher. Association is rapidly approach-1 ses for thirty-odd years. i and threshing sending1 "Gucss J'011 could say isj Allen and his wife, and their ing. During the past week. As-i Mr. West says "the majority of sleadv now of the bumner croo lhe hard wa-v to dt> Allen' T a spread area of the United States. !a far-flung interest This year's sale will be held on only buyers the famous Echo Ranch south of Sooner Supply in Allen. building Allen works for an Ada oil com-, Francis and His wife works for Valley iwas everything from automobile Wai-Key pulling and shocking View Hospital in Ada. She has "reS Sheriff i-., ,nj IOren Phillips Said lhe gained entry into the prying loose the front door. Mysterious Illness Hits at E. C, Causes Students to Miss Classes Ada en State Highway 99. j The sale will get underway j Mr w promptly at 1 p. m., Saturday. J" October 15. j Horses consigned at the sale: Walter Britten, recognized will start arriving on October 14. throughout the nation as an out-! Marvin Barnes and Pete Winters standing auotionee-. will officiate: are ei ht h h t at this years event. Mr. West1., said luncheon would be served on sale' and otller breeders con- fhe gro-.mds. signing animals are Raymond Forty-five head of top quarter: Brookshire, Dr. R. E. Cowling, horses in this part of the state will i Vincent Daly, Lloyd Daniels, Ed be offered for sale during the'' Bottoms, Quinn Hill, Charles Big- afternoon's bidding. Some of the'nam> Frank Jared. Stanley John- mares scheduled to go under Orville Maxey, Joe Roberts, auctioneer's hammer are in O'Daniel and Robert Sli- by the famous stallion, Go Man j Ser- Go. that recently sold for j Curing recent years there has One mare, a spokesman for the been a tremendous increase in the i ECQHA said, will have a colt from popularity of quarter horses. At the outstanding quarter sale on the E. Paul Wag- Iprpli T't'ht'llT ,nlaehinel'y "as largely taken the and keeps all its minerals. VYhen'cis, a girl of" 14, is a freshman i ria-v. They spend the time work- ivlfand of harvest- it's time lo thresh, I'll spot a: at.Vanoss High School this year, on their farm, lyeis ana seiieis, mil ,ng on hut some Ihrcshing machine in the center Wayne is a senior there They're both native Oklaho- !siea in looking including the Dennis Allen of the field and use two wagons1 The Aliens are spare time mans- He was born in Ada she northeast Oil for hauling. We'll use pitchforks, farmers, and say profits from page stallion. Tonta Bars Gill. A colt Ranch at Vernon, Texas, from this horse, named Tonta 3fi head went for an average of Bars Hank, recently wor each. A record-breaking ai Ruidoso Downs in Ruidoso, j Price a quarter horse was paid New Mexico. long ago at the Gosselin sale In addition to the above-men-1 m Oklahoma City, when the fam- tioned forty-five head that will be ;olls horse Josie Bar went for offered at" the sale. Echo Ranch, will consign and sell five of its j The richest quarter horse race top racing quarter horses. nation is the "All Ameri- ranch, owned by Carl is j can Futurity" held at Ruidoso known nationally as an outstand- i Oowns. First place winner there ing breeder of quarter horses, averages a take of Most of them have been handled; (Continued on page two) Included in the mammoth had by Officers are investigating tin A mysterious siege of illness hit East Central State College Thurs- day, causing more than 60 stu- dents to miss classes. College of- ficials originally thought it was some form of food poisoning, but subsequent investigation leads them lo believe it is some other infection. T. K. Treadwell, dean of stu- dents, said 60 students who live in the college dormitories were ab- sent from classes Thursday morn- ing. at first thought it had (Continued on page two) something to do with the food served at Knight Hall Treadwell said. "But, we later found some people who didn't even eat at the cafeteria who were also sick Thursday morn- ing. The illnesses were characterized by high temperatures and vomit- ing. "I don't think we have people who are very Tread- well added. "However, it really knocked a hole in our attendance. They apparently recover pretty (Continued on page two) cJLiakL J Q .f- nina ivina oom town ome By MRS. W. E. SNYDER j to move, she waited for what j Smoke damage was so extensive HADND: J''5 that in a few more years such scenes as the above will be a thing of the past in rontotoc Counrv. Peanut n.irvnctinn >c ii_ _ _ r. in Pontotoc County. Center, says at work pull Cm Pn h 9 o e pas County. Peanut harvesting is done mostly with combines now. However, Dennis Allen, northeast of Oil ina P "Ve hay' The Allen is ing and shocking peanuts in the field below their house. See other cut inside. (WEEKLY Photo) A few years ago the house on seemed ;es with her heart in the place owned by Mr. and Mrs. i her mouth. When she did muster B. E. Dause, located on the high- 1 courage to open the door that way a mile north of Fittstown, j leads from the hall into the living was destroyed by fire that was! room, she found it filled with started by a bolt of lightning, acrid smoke. She ran to Mr. Dause's bed- Whoever coined the ning never strikes in the samejroom and when ght! place would have to revise his he was in the living room, kitchen and dining area, that Mrs. Dause doubts they will ever eradicate its havoc. Even the chrome lids to her utensils are blackened and although the copper portion came shining clean fairly easily, the chrome has resisted all efforts. When the Causes first bought Causes. j was the happiest moment of herjthe place] about twenty-five years About p. m. Monday Mr. DRUSB had been awaken-1 ago, a smal barn on the site ing the thunderstorm that hit by the shots too, but thought was destroyed by lightning, area and shortly after they had re-1 they were backfire from the ex-1 Mrs. Dause has been doing tired, Mvs. was aroused j haust of a passing car on the some research to determine if from sleep by the sourd of rifle j highwrj. The gunfire was trigger- j there actually were places that shots coming from the direction j ed when several 22 shells laying; apparently attract lightning and of the living room. j on top of th; television set explod- she has already learned that there ise is statement after interviewing the tllere safe and sound sne sald ]t _ O _____ ji _ i ____ Her first thought was that Mr. i ed. Dause, who occupier an adjoin- ing oedroom, had heard a prowl- Together the Dauses extinguish- ed the fire that had been smol- ing animal of some kind around j dering long enough to destroy the the house and was shooting at it. Before she could get up to go see, a single shot was fired that she knew for sure was inside the television set. The curtains and blinds on the window nerest the set were damaged as tvas the wall. There was a large house and fear gripped her. Afraid i hole burned in the carpet. It is believed that a certain type of ore deposit underground is responsible. After things had cahrt) down, Alice says Mr. Dause remark- ed accusingly. "You would wait till all the shooting was over be- fore you come to see about Galley -Vanting Around The County STONEWALL By MRS. MEARL GREGORY Visitors in the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Barns Wednesday evening were Mrs. Bertie Lilley and Mrs. Zoa White. guests between engagements. He I and children visited Mr, and Mrs.! Leona Miller of Jesse spent e home of h.s aren has been appearing in Las Vegas, I J. C. Hale, former Stonewall i Monday in Stonewall visiting her ann ic rvn nic uia 17 TVi-i- ,1 __ i .._i-_ ____ i n_ __ home of h.s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cradduck. Several of the teen-agers and i adults of the Free Will Baptist j-ru-jsiui. CM 1.3, J.V1L dllU 1V1I b. lieU VcV rt IICI; Church attended the fellowship j and her parents. Mr. and Mrs meeting in Wilson Saturday night. I J. P. Heard of Konawa. Bob Slaughter, who is a local Visitors in the home of Mrs mtneranW, has been in Okla-i Virginia Creech Friday were Mrs. 'Charles Brady and daughters of Mesqtiite, Tex her niece, Ida Croford from Florida. The Church of Christ had 72 in attendance Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Howard Ganus _., L.---------o ij.ait, and is on his way to Dallas, Tex, residents, who are now employ- to fill an engagemtnt. While here ed in Lindsay and live in Pauls they also visited his grandpar-'Valley, ents. Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Allen business. Sunday afternoon visiting sever-, e rs. al friends in Ada and Stonewall. homa City the past week on i Charles Brady and daughters of They visited Ada Crow and gie Tlowers, both are in Valley View Hospital. Mr. and Mrs. E. Pannell of Ada and Mrs. Pate of St -wall. Mrs. Frank Bynum's brother, Jim (Rocky) Stone and Mrs Stone, stopped over in Stonewall this past week. Mr. Stone, who Air. and Mrs, Charles Cradduck plays with Smiley Weaver's band Mr. and Mrs Lea Elliott of Fitzhugh visited her parents. Mr. and Mrs. C, L. Gibson last Sun- day. Mr. and Mrs. Gibson also had as visitors their son, W. C. Elliott and Bill of Atoka and Rev. and Mrs. Steve Ritter. Mr. and Mrs, R. D. May. Mr. and Mrs. Bert May visited thier parents, Mr. an'- Mrs. Raford May in Blossom, Tex. last week. mother, Mrs. R. D. May. Robert Ann Jamison of Mid- land, Tex., is visiting her moth- er, Mrs. M. L. Jamison week. this Mrs. Nancy Stewart and Doug visited with her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Thurman Heck of Lind- say this past week. lunch with her granddaughter, Zona Morgan in Ada. Other guests included Bernice Bargas from California. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Newber- ry and children visited his uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Newberry this week. Mr. and Mrs. Leon Mullins of Frisco visited in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Newberry Sun- day night and attended church at Harden City. Guests of Mr. and Mrs. Mrs. Frank Newberry spent Manard have been Mr. and Mrs, Carol Stewart and boys. Monday with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Newberry Jr. in Ada. Last Wednesday Mrs. Frank Mrs. C. H. Leard had Sunday Newberry was on an arrand of mercy as she took Mr. Newber- ry's nephew to thp Valley View Hospital with a back injury. He is reported doing better. Mr. and Mrs. Dick Hendrix and Randy of Ada visited Mr. and Mrs. Frank Newberry one day last week. iberger visited her parents, Mr. I and Mrs. G. M. Woodruff at Mans- ville Thursday. Rev. and Mrs. Charles Tenni- son, pastor of the Assembly of God Church in Stonewall, are in Oklahona City this week attend- ing an Association Convention. The Assembly of God had a Sunday school attendance of 26 this week. It war down slightly. Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Shellen- The Circle S Square Dance Club, which met at the old Pleas- ant Hill School at East Jesse, re- port good attendance at the les- sons now in progress. The class will ?Iose Monday, October 10 to new beginners. Those wishing to take lessons should attend the gathering Monday night. The club, which is a member of the State Federation of S q u a r e Dancers, has its own by-laws and rules, one of which is "no drink- ing allowed at any meeting." Members feel this is a good way to have an evening of clean fun and visit with friends and neigh- bors. Glen Trimmer, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lance, Bobby and Eddie of Ada visited their parents, Mr. and Mrs.Elmer Trimmer Sunday. Mrs. Vera Walker and daugh- ters Sandra and Debby of Vanoss visited her mother, Mrs. Steve Lilley and Rev. Lilley Friday. Visitors this last week in the Lilley home were their daugh- ters and families. Mr. and Mrs. Vergil Shannon of Seminole, Mr. and Mrs. Jadi Walker of Vanoss. (Continued on page two)   

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