Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Ada Weekly News: Thursday, November 22, 1934 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - November 22, 1934, Ada, Oklahoma                             VOLUME XXXIV ADA, NOVEMBER 22, 1934 TO 40 DEGREES IE LUST I Newsboy Is Hurt By Rope On Truck Unknown Buy K e p o r t e il Badly Bruised In Accident Last Snow Reported in Several Places In Northern Part Of State RAINS CAUSE DAMAGE Property Damage Reported Heavy In Southern Stalei; One Dead The thermometer lilt low for here ''ist night as :i cold north wind drove tin- mercury I11 degrees at midnight. Tin- cold wind followed close mi tin- heels of III'1 heaviest rain- fall here In HI.mi- lime, part u genera! drenching covering a large iiiirtinii of tin- southwest. Tin- higli wind n> dry tlie last night as inter- mittent showers continued I" fri'l here, hill 111-- decidedly rnld blast gave Ada a taste (if what may In- on I In1 way. Weather foiicast fur today and tomorrow Indicated tliat the temperature w n I d gradually rise and weather I" ex- pected Ki miss I his section of tin' mule for I tit- present. :it least. (Ill 'Hit A iiorlln-r whipped a cold wavej followed hy snow Into OUIalm- nia last olght. Temperatures were sent tuinli-j Him to tin- Inwesi of the season In tin- wake of statewide; rains. llaln' turned to snow at Knl'l. and Illackwell about K p. in., and tin- snow became slei't. 1'onca Clly also reported snow tailing anil Oklahoma City tot Its tlrst flakes around m. Tin- rainfall was heavier In the eastern half of the slate yes- terday, with tin- western por- tions reporting lower lempcr- alures. The mermry was pecled to leach from L'I to degrees. imiiuigc Toll Heavy NF.W Oltl.l'ANS. Nov. 21 l.Vi One person was drowned, at least five others were Injured and properly damagi amis of dollars was (he hliislery general that diem-hed [xirlions toilay. The liody of Ceorge C.reen. year old negro preacher, was found In the wiiterfllled near Campl. I.a. At Memplils approximately II Inrlies of rain had lieeu gau-ed from 11 p. m. Tuesday until lilmul p. 111. Wednesday. Scores of families were marooiiei! ill tin- low Hoofs were Mown off. chim- neys collapsed, trees were up- rooted and windows w e r e Mnashcd. rriiin I i All unidentified newsboy was I badly bruised Imt believed not Js-rio'iisly Injured late Wednes- day afternoon when he was ac- cid'enlally caught In a rope tied to the hack of a truck and drag- 1 ged for some distance, i According to reports received at the sheriffs office last night. I a truck turned the corner ofj Main street and Stockton avenue and a rope attached to the rear of Ihe sideboards swung out. en- tangling the boy as he stood; walling for the truck to pass. The hoy was dragged feet bofnre the driver was aware of the accident. The newsboy was sa.d to have been taken to a nearby store where it was discovert d that no hones were broken and that his Injuries, although painful, were not serious. The truck was said lo belong to the Ada Fruit company. OIL CO, SELLS LEASE TO PHILLIPS CO. Southwest Quarter of 25-2-6 Involved in Deal Just Announced TERMS NTGlEN HERE Kemp and Crabtree Complete Second Shallow Producer In Allen Area TRUCK DRIVER FORCES SCHOOL BUS FROM ROAD NUMBER 34 I From The Some Injuries May Prove Seri- ous, Chickasha Hospital Authorities Report TRUCKllR FLEES Officers of Other Counties on'Gets -1.39 Inches From Thurs- TO SPEEfl Watch to Capture Man Blamed For Wreck day Until 4 P. M. Tues- dny. Gauge Shows Bill Nolen Suffers Dangerous Unife Wound. Henry Mardis Shot MODE WELLS ADDED TEJJS FIELD K1LROUK. lex.. Nov. SlMy-iine wells were completed In the East oil Held dur- ing the week ending Nov. IS. according to records of the en- gineering department of the state railroad commission. The new wells Inn-eased the total unru- lier In the Held from to 1 .VI The completions increased the allowable daily production by 1.- 5.V, barrels; from 4lo.r.s7 to 412.14; barn-Is. The hourly po- tential was Increased bar- rels, from 11.21 I barn-Is to II. 27f.. 174. Ol the completions. 1 were marginal wells, bringing wells In that classllicaiioii lo a total of 2.110. (I'riMii One man was seriously Injured hy a knife wound In an affray oil F.ast Main street nut! on West Fourteenth another man was painfully but not dangerously hurt when struck by a charge of shot.' Ilolb Incidents oc- curred early Tuesday night. Itlll Nolen. employed at the, Sweat! Cleaning Works. Is at the Sugg clinic where he was taken after receiving several knife wounds, one of them ser- ious. Several of the wounds are on the shoulders and arms, but one p......traleil the left side, nicking Ihe lung cover. Nolan lost much blood and a transfusion was glv- of liioiis- en him after the wounds bad caused by been treated. rainstorms! Because of his condition Nolen of five i Was not allowed lo talk Tuesday i night or early today. He was to talk with county authorities thi afternoon. Ttie altercation occurred In tin- rear part of the building 'iccu- pled hv swealt's eslabllslimi.nl. John '.Montgomery. who w a s working temporarily for readily admitted to officers 'hat he was the other parly In th" trouble. Just what led to the scu'fl-' has not been fully revealel Montgomery Indicated that self- defense would be bis explanation knlfi Fleelborn Oil corporation in Ada lute Tuesday con- firmed reports that the lease held by that company on the southwest (iitarter of section 2-c, had been sold. The name of the Phillips Pe- troleum corporation was as the buyer In the latest of several major sales of holding.! In the Fills field. The amount of cash Involved In Die deal was not announced. The lease Involves 1HO acres of land on which no wells have yet 'been started, but the new owners' reported preparing to move In at once and drill the No. 1 Philip Norrls, exact location of which i has not been announced. The l-'leetborn company retains part of Its holdings in the Flits field and other parts of the l-'ianks grahen. Two new locations announced for the Flits field In southeast Pontotoc county lire Deep Bock's No. 1' Dawes Harden In southeast j or southeast of northeast and Deep Kock No. Dawes Harden In northeast of southeast of north i east of "0-2-7. Deep Hock recent-] ly complete the No. 1 Dawes Har- den as a big producer In the bro-, mlde sand. Few reports came from Ihej Fills field today because several inches of rain In the past five days have slowed operations and mad" difficult travel In the J. Croshle No. 1A D. Harden lu this morning was at feet. Moore and others No. Ada has shared generously In the distribution of rains over the state this week, a glanco over the records of the custodian of the government rain gauge. Dr. K. A. Mac.Mlllan, reveals. Since November 13 tho rain- half a mile south of Nlnnelsali j fan in nils totaled 4 this morning. i ch The bus driver, Asco Iloberts. i 20. and three of the children I a were In critical condition In! of today Chickasha CHICKASHA, Nov. Sixteen school children were In-.j jnred severely today when a school hus plunged into a bridge after being crowded off the road by a "big blue truck and trailer" and tha t Smith In IM-2-7, has drilled but has not resumed drilling be- low. i K. W. Kemp and Krnest Crab- it ree reported completion of a tiD- 1 barrel well, the No. 1 McKlroy. in Section 22-5-S. Allen field. The I new veil was drilled lo HT.o feet Into the Allen sand. i It Is their second producer, be- 1 ing an offset to their No. 1 [Whiloley In the same section. In the Ilehae field the Sinclair- Prairie Oil company Is about i ready to start drilling In the south east corner of northwest quarter j of 2 the No. 1 Clellllllle Starrilt. Stolen Car Is Found Quickly hospitals. Officers of Ihe surrounding ter- ritory were notified and were on the alert for the truck which was headed south toward Law- ton and Duncan. 1.1st or Injured Roberts, described as a "most careful driver" was unconscious iwlth severe head Injuries and I possible Internal Injuries, I The children most dangerously 1 hurt were: Carol Slmonds. both legs brok- en lust below the hips. j litith Falls, fractured hip. j Herald OHbrealh. fractured hip.! The other injured, ranging In age from kindergarten beginner' to high school students, were; Dorothy Williams, cuts and bruises. Leona Hlldreth. bruised back and head cuts. Sammle Steelmau. severe scalp wounds. Mahota Taylor, cuts and bruises. Clara Belle McClellan. had; In- juries. Lazelle Wilin. head Injuries. Marcella Coldiron. shoulder and hack injuries, and shock. J. J. Cllbreatli. severe Internal Injuries. L. K. St.iggs. a girl, severe cuts J9 In- that does not Include has fallen since 4 afternoon. have considerably to the record tor the city, 'and another reading in Accord With Efforts j And Giving Active Sup- port to Program ANY Roddie to Investigate Question Of Old Age Pension For State OKLAHOMA Cm'. Nov. legislative mit- chlnery Is to he overhauled to speed Clovernor-elect K. W. Mar- land's "new deal" Into being. Phillips, following a conference I with Marland. announced today steps to revamp the house to ex- pedlte security, relief and reform i legislation. i Phillips' seven new committees 'would be created with Marland's Marland's Choice For Relief Chief Called to Washington CONVICTS ATTEMPT TO will be made at 4 o'clock lhl.s j approval. Phillips turned bis at- arternoon to ascertain how much tentlon to selection of tho coin- has fallen in the 21 hours pre- niltlee memberships hut said It cedinc that time. would he several days probably Heaviest rainfall of the past lieforo he would be able to an- five days came Monday, when nounco the personnel, the city Was drenched by a down- Meanwhile. Marland at his pour for much of the mornin--. iPonca City "capltol." concentrat- 1 More rain fell Intermittently ed on plans: iTtiesdav and Tuesday nlsht. To reorsunlze tlie re- Wednesday mornlns dawned lief administration In Oklahoma with'low hniisliiB clouds. under John Eddlemau. his asslst- and'not Ions after daybreak a ant campaign manaKer. Kentle rain beKan to fall Incroas-l To abolish attto tue BBentsad ssfflsi I'ONCA CITY. Nov. 'John Kddleman. governor elect IE. YV. Marland'H choice for state j relief administrator, was mini-1 j moiled to Washington today for conferences Monday with Harry L. Hopkins, federal relief chief. The summons, wired hy Krank P. Douglas, a Marlaml adviser who was named a memher of the textile labor conciliation hoard yesterday, was Interpreted as signifying a chance In the state relief organization beforu Marland's Inauguration In Janu- ary. Carl Giles, the present admin- istrator. In Washington on relief business, asld yesterday he had been "approached" with a ten- tative offer of a position In the federal relief setup. Meanwhile. state politicians saw In the developments an end to tin- federal patronage drought as a result of MarlandV close liaison with the new deal. O. S. Massey Painfully Hurt When Car Skids and Col- lides With Truck Investigation and study. Phillips iflselosed that the seven new committees being I formed will (leal with state and federal relief, which will In- clude subsistence homesteads. erosion, reclamation. drainage, 'and unemployment Insurance: nbllc welfare, which will study leemosynary and penal lastltu- ons. charities and corrections; regulations, fees about the head and arms. I Lester McCracken and his three brothers. Calvin, Jimmy, and Ward, cuts and bruises. j I'tigh Simons. 17. cuts and j bruises. j Labota Btirllsnn. Ifi, bruises i and shock. i Superintendent llanna of th O. S. Massey. Ada business man. received one or two broken ribs and several painful bruises Monday afternoon when the car he wa's driving crashed Into a truck near Mcl.oud, Okla. According to reports received here last night. Mr. Massey's car and collided headon the Chlck'ashti hospital said several wlth the truck. smashing of the children were suffering I front end of his car badly, from severe shock and that the) jt was not learned whether full extent of their Injuries hud driver of the truck was In- been determined. ljured but Mr. Massey was alone Kti-y Of l-Iye Witnesses jjn j, not A dent I I graphic account of the was given by Mr. and acci- car_ Mrs. j Is Returned To Owner Half Hour In of resorting lo IKO.' of th Virgil Mardis was arrested at'-! ---------_ ter a brother. Henry Mardis. Car Stolen Here Sunday Might the recipient of a load of No. t _ _ shet. No. steps had been taken today toward filing of charges. although the latter was able to leave the hospital this morning. The shooting Is reported to have occurred at the home of Virgil Mardis. The shot were 'scattered over Henry Mardis' hack and neck, penetrating only a short distance. He was taken to the Ilreco i hospital win-re most of the shot wounds sheriff's force did nuleU The sheriffs force OKI work here Sunday night n re- sphnol covering a stolen automobile, re-' turning the missing property Us owner In less than thirty was given emergency treat- at Shawnee and was J. H. DKon of Fort Worth, Tev..' to the Sugg clinic here who wen- driving slowly clo'ie where It was reported behind the bus In a misting raln.'tnat Injuries were not bellev- "II was the most terrible tiling ever said I _ The truck. Dlxou said, also forced his car to the edge of th" paving. As Dlxon related the scene. Ihe truck driver was speeding southward down the middle of forced "to iVti'll off the paving to D. W. Bryant Is Held Up And avoid being hit. skidded In the' mud and crashed Into the Oil Field'Worker Is Holdup Victim Robbed of by Two Armed Men "all were removed dressed. and Ihe mm ASSAILED Pa.. Nov. f.l'j Luclen Koch, director of Commonwealth College, at Mena. Ark., claims thai l.loO.llon ten- ant-farmeis In the cotton of the south are "held in virtual peonage." In a speech yesterday hefoiv. members of the Hungry Club, of Pittsburgh. Koch assailed the new deal for alleged failure "to alleviate the poverty of share- croppers" In the cotton fields. Driven to desperation by tin- planters. Kosh continued. 2.000 of the tenant farmers In Arkan- sas have formed a union to pro- test against continuance of the new deal cotton program. He said the tenant-farmers chief protest against the pro- gram Is that ''they have not shared In Its benefits." and he- cause their conditions "have ac- tually been made worse under the national policies." Koch also told of efforts he said are being made to prevent the share-croppers from organlz- Farmers with tax exemption certificates Issued under provis- ions of the p.ankhead cotton bill and who have not enough cotton lo use up their certificates are being warned that Saturday, i fleers November 21. is the deadline for their turning them Into the national maiU pool from which they will re- ceive some cash return. If they do not turn them in. the certificates would be gon'l next year only If the liankhead cotton control program is con- tinued, but If It Is done away with the certificates would h.' worthless. It Is through such that a cotton producer has been able to gel some pay for "cotton he did not raise" or the amount of cotton between what he did raise and what he was allocated under the control program. minutes after the theft was re- ported. A Ilulck sedan belonging to Mr. Price of the Ada company was taken from its parking place in front of the l-'lrst Christian church while Its owner was attending services In- side. As soon as he discovered that his car was gone, Mr. Price re- ported It to the sheriff's offlc--. Two of officers were Im- mediately dispatched and In a few minutes had located the car In the southwest part of the city. The thieves apparently had abandoned the car when the of- pressed too closely trail. No arrests M. LltSTOCK Immediately TMvon's wife got out and did what she could for the children while be raced to telephone and notified the Chick- j asha hospital. Then the Dlxons remained on the scene, caring for the fright- ened and bleeding children, and halting all passing cars to rush the children to the hospital. All of the children lived In the Agawan community. II. F. Jolly, superintendent of Ihe Nlnneknh school, said the Dlxons had done "wonderful work." Roberts. Jolly said, was regarded as one of anfl most careful drivers In the sys- j About children were aboard Wl'r'''the hus. Several were given first aid anil a few escaped injury. Democrats Have Negro Problem On Their Hands WASHINGTON. Nov. Capltol employes are wondering' what some southern democratic representatives will do lu the Fittstown is beginning to takt on more of the aspects of a typl cal oil boom town, as holdup men are making their appearance 01 Ihe scene. D. W. Bryant, oil field work er. was reported to have beei held up and robbed early Mon day morning by two armed met as he was on his way to work. According to reports by the sheriff's office here, Bry ant slowed his car for a ha place In the road when the tw men jumped out and forced him to surrender his money. The robbers netted J22.S5, I was reported. The men escape In a car parked near the seen of the holdup and up to hit last night no clues had bee found which might lead to the! arrest. AUTO HITS IGOfi Heavy Decrease Over Last Year: Oklahoma at Lowest Mark on Record WASHINGTON. Nov. Coltoit of this year's crop ginned prior to November H was re- ported today by the census bu- reau to have totaled 8.fi32.991 running bales, exclusive of llnt- ers, counting round bales as half hales and Including 021 bales of American-Egyptian. Last year to that date totaled 'l1.24S.200 running bales Including 47ti.5S7 round bales nd salaries, motor and hales of American- on old age penxlons and audit- F.gyptinn .and two years ago gln- of legislative expenditures. nlng totaled 1 'running bales, Including round bales and bales of Ameri- can-Egyptian. The Indicated crop this year has been by the department of agriculture as being fl.filM.nOO hales of pound gross weight each, to November 14 by rtates and comparative figures for a year ago In parenthesis follow: Alabama. 940.1 Arizona, fin.2.17, Ar- kansas. Cal- ifornia, Flor- work under soni" Ida. Louisiana. Make Break For Freedom During Heavy Rain TWO ARE WOUNDED Bill Anderson, Grady Middn And Gordon Blood Are In Group McALESTER. Okla.. Nov. 19 (AP) Two convicts were shot and seriously wound- ed and three others were re- captured in a break for free- dom from the Oklahoma peni- tentiary durinK a heavy rain here nt o'clock tonight. The wounded were: Bill Anderson, sentenced to 7 years for burglary from Pon- totoc county. Melvin Gatlin, sentenced to life for robbery from Coman- che county. The others were: (irndv Mltkle, serving 39 years for a I'ontotoc county rob- bery; (iordon Illodd, serving 27 years for a robbery In the sanio county; Clarence II-OIIH. serving SO years for n Hughes county rob- bery. Prison authorities said ttiat wall guards fired Into the group of convicts as they ran toward the wall carrying an Improvised ladder made from portions of steel bunks. Warden Sam Brown said tho wounded convicts received charg- es of buckshot In tho arnm ami IR Creation of the nndltlnm com ilttee "to see how the law-mak- nc body spends Its approprla- ions" marked a now step In at- 'inpllni; to..check Individual ex- ravasniices, such as the common ractlce of wholesale purchasing f stamps. Would Abolish Tac Audits Marland yesterday conferred several members of the ouse and after the conference lade a statement declaring for he abolishment of the auto tas Rents with their fee and the uttlnc of the ounty official. He" said ho also found the eslslators much .In sympathy vith a plan to abate tax penal- les for taxes due In or >rlor to that time not only upon cal property but upon person.il homa, iroperty as well.' i South Ills endorsement of Eddleman. SflS who was assistant campaign dl- rector, came following word from Washington that Krank I'. Doug- ass who had boon looked upon is heir apparent to the job now leld by Carl r.iles was being con- sidered to head the textile dlvls-] on of the new steel and labor conciliation hoard to be named soon by President Roosevelt. Marland also announced tht> ippnlntnipnt of a committee to make a survey of all state In- stitutions and recommend Instl- ntlonal legislation. The committee composed of 27 Oklahomans, follows: Mrs. John Leavell, Tulsa: 1'rof. J. J. Rhyne. Oklahoma I'nlver- slty; Prof. August uf O. C. 1'.: Mrs. Ben Hlrschland. Mrs. Reorge Calvert. Joe N. Hamilton. Mrs. Katherlne Van Charles France. Miss Kdlth Johnson, the 151. Rev. J. A. Rarvey. Mrs. Katl Mississippi, Missouri. New Mexl co. 71.S45, North Car- olina, Okla- Carolina. Tennessee. (34fi.- Texas. 2.141.520, Vlrglnla. CtO.n'H; all other slates. 12.0110. Linscheid Talks To Schoolmasters legs. I do not .think the hnllors struck any vital sprits." ho said. The warden said that guards Hood and Cox called to Ratl'n and Anderson an they raced across the prison deadline close to the walls and fired when they failed to halt. The other threw dropped their Improvised lad- ders and fell back Into the cen- ter of the prison yard whero they were taken without trouble. Mlckle recently slabbed Pnill Evans, another convict when tho latter was being "dressed out" for parole. Evans had received the parole for giving Informa- tion to the prison auihor'tles that led to the recovery of weapons. secreted In the peni- tentiary. It was the fourth break at- tempted by Ratlin. On two pre- vious occasions ho escaped wtlTi his brother. Luther Ratlin and on another he fled alone. Luth- er, also uniler a long sentence for robbery, now Is a fugitive after escaping last August !l from prison. Seven guards sus- pended after his escape. Foster, Miss Margaret S. Veasey. Lieut. Robert Houston, Mrs. C.eorge Waddy. Pr. Carl Puckett, all of Oklahoma City; Mrs. For- >st Reese. Mrs. George Abbott, Verio Teeter, all of Tulsa; Miss Tressa Ilnrger. Dlackwell; Mrs. Tom Rammle. Ponca City; Jeffer- son S. KwlDK. Healdton; Judge R. Everett Mnrr. Kingfisher: Reorge W. Wood. Helena; Mrs. Mrs. McALKSTKU. Nov. The condition of txvo convicts who attempted to escape from the state I prison last night and were abut down was described today hy Warden Sam Drown as not seri- ous. Prison physicians plucked buck- Bhot from flesh wounds of Melvin Ratlin, former Arizona had man. and P.III Anderson, n convicted burglar, and predicted their rapid recovery. Five prisoners attempted to The Schoolmasters club I'ontotoc county met Tuesday night at Vanoss with excellent attendance and an Interesting program. Vanoss high school furnished musical numbers for the program. llr. A. l.lnscheld spoke on the condition of schools In regard to taxation, on the falling Income and the 'necessity for finding escape over the wallx during a other means to assure the driving rainstorm hy means o a "c nols of enough money to car- crude ladder made ry on their work. prison cots hut were halted by Tho club voted to Install a gunIIre from two wall guards tolephone In the office of the! county superintendent, a provls-] Ion that will mean much to the convenience of the superintend- lent In conducting the affairs of his office. I A legislative committee con- slating of Ray Stegall. county 'superintendent. Frank Spencer of East Central and W. C. Rn Proposes Jail For Nudists fi Young Woman Injured When Struck by Car A young Semlnole county far- mer named Payne, about wn' brought to the Sugg clinic here for emergency treatment Satur- day night after the wagon he was driving was struck by an automobile. I Payne's Injuries were said hy hosplal attendants not to be ser- lous.There were no fractures al- though he sustained a number Miss Vera Payne was Injured late Saturday evening on West Main street when she was knocked down and run over by an automo- bile which sped away from the scene Immediately after the accl- i dent. Miss Payne was taken to Ada hospital by ambulance. There Ing. and he described the oper- j atlous of the cooperative labor college he represents. Greatest returns for the amount invested Nuws ClattilBt-d Ada. a .-mil was found lo have snffel fracture of the right thigh, several minor Injuries. The young woman was walki'i In toward the city when the dent occurred. LOS ANGF.LF.S, Calif., Nov. A. and M. col- lege swept about everything in championship at the ninth annual great western livestock show. been elected. The grand championship went Mitchell succeeds republican to "Tuxedo Bill" of the Baldwin! Ascar del'rlest. congress's first P.anch at Pleasanton. Calif., but I negro. the Oklahoma school captured. O. P. Speaker longwortli _ the following blue ribbons: greeted him with a hamshake of bruises and minor cuts "Ivan Page." Aberdeen Angus when he first was elected, but. He was said to been calf reserve grand championship, some democrats from the south, driving his wagon and team a- Two firsts with herefords. four refused to speak to del'rlest or ong the cut-oft road with three with to eat In the house restaurant home between the McHeown with Amrd.tn. Angus, time Tlley wcnt bridge and Sasakwa. when, a car to the senate cafe at the other, coming from the opposite dlrec- end of the capltol or ate In thejtlon struck his wagon head on. democratic cloak room, which Details of the accident were closed to republicans. ,not learned but unconfirmed re- Mitchell, being a democrat. ports stated that both of Paynes naturally will have to sit on the j mules were and his wagon democratic side of the chamber.'demolished In the crash. Nov. As a memher of congress he Is The name of the driver of the entitled to eat In the cloak room 'automobile was not made known He down on the big soft leather last night, couches there, or use any of other privileges of a congress- fireatest re urns man. hivcutcU News A. C. Slekman. Ilartlesvllle; Dlllard H. Clark, Jr.. Ponca and Mrs. Kate Xanels. Stlllwater. In addition Marland appointed II. M. Roddie, Oklahoma City, a 'ormer state senator, to head a committee to study old age pen- sions. lory of Stonewall was to cooperate with tho Education Association state legislature In developing an appointed I Oklahoma j and the I shorthorns. The Oklahoma A. and M. anN mals were In charge of Prof. W. L. nilzzard and Arthur MacAr- thur. Professor Ttllzzard was one of the Judges for lambs, hogs and carlot entries. ________ _ _ OKLAHOMA CITY. (.Ti Extradition of Clyde Harri- son from Tulsa to Jackson coun- ty, .Missouri. to face forgerv charges was ordered today u. Governor Murray. effective latlon pro Unemployed Vets Asked To Report To NRS Offices Unemployed World war veter-lwere reported today by Joseph ans who have registered with j n. Cosgrove. president of the tho National He-employment of-: sixth district federal Intermediate fice. especially those who have i credit bank of St. Louts, some trade classification, have: Mr. Cosgrove based his opln- been asked hy those In charga. Ion on the rapid repayment or to report at once to tlie head- j the short-term loans made to quarters office In room farmers so they can finance Federal building. i crops. More than flO per cent It has been announced that] of the loans made In the district several contracts arc to be let for the production of cotton In soon and veteran applications I 19S4 already have been paid, he discharge papers or Veter-lsald. IK ans Bureau claim number which The local Intermediatei credit are active and properly certified bank, he explained, has dlscnun- OKLAHOMA CITY. Nov. Imprisonment for organ Izers or members of nudist col- onies In this slate would be pro- vided under n bill which Marvir. ii r- j Woolen. Semlnole county repre- :ram of school legln-1 tentative, snld he plans to Intro- duct- In the next legislature. "The Idea seems to tie prev.i- lenl in the fulled States for oeo- ple to organize nudists' Woolen said. "Of course we a few criminal statutes prohibit- ing obscenity, still 1 favor a 1-iw. with a penalty of life Imprison- ment, for anybody to organize or to become a member of a lurlists' 'colony within the state of Okla- homa." REPORTED BETTER ST. LOIHS. NOV. proved agricultural conditions In Missouri. Illinois and Arkansas DOUGLASS NAMED Oklahoma Man to Textile l-nboi- Hoard be given preference. The, offlcn open from m. until 4 P> m. S a. ted cotton loans totaling J3.- of which only 880 remains unpaid. WASHINGTON. Nov. 20. Frank 1'. Douglass of Oklahoma City today was named a memher of the textile labor relations board. Douglass Buoceedn James A. Mullenbach .of Chicago who slgned because of lllnenn. Doug- lass previously four railway-labor boards. Herved on mediation   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication