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Ada Weekly News Newspaper Archive: September 6, 1934 - Page 1

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Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - September 6, 1934, Ada, Oklahoma                             VOLUME XXXIV ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6, 1934 NUMBER 23 IRE TEXTILE MILLS CLOSED BY mm, PISSES Or. I.. I family home Chief Hope of Early Settle-; ment Centered on Action Icliurch Of President RIOT AT LOWELL Moore died at tin- In Stonewall Sunday I! morning at Funeral s.-r- 11 vires were held from the Ilaptisl church at Stonewall Monday af- ternoon at L> Dr. C. C. Mot- Iris, pastor of (he First liapllst I of Atla. be Ins the minis-' in charge. P.urlal was In ce.....tery following tin1 services. I Surviving Dr. Mooro are Mrs. one daughter. M-'H. Harry ;.Martin; and three brothers of Ile- Flyim: Squadron of Strikers troll. Texas. i Dr. Moore had been a practlc- Busy in Chief Centers ol nhyslclan In Stonewall for Industry .many years and leaves a host of 'friends throughout the county uu Thr CIM.I Ito mourn his untimely passing, sldeni Ci.osi-veli annonnceit reached the ag- of ii.i Ilia, be would appoint a'years death ended his lo mediate (be gen-Till 'inborn. textile industry. sections of l'i country inllN Ilia, operaled leiday were rinsed. The iiiini.ier Idle, 'inclndlni: both -uikeis ami Ihdse Whom .lie strike put OU. I't work rose from 'joo.iniii to at leas, Heads of the woolen iiitinn sections of industry at a luncheon conference derided lo obtain all protection possible for fe-.ille workers who wish toj remain at their Jobs. I Pefer Van Horn, leader of I no! (I'm silk Industry, speaking for the I Oct< conferees, said that they thought', as lh '-y i possible opener of now area. Itocommendallon will be made In the ,lu> drilling the corporation commission continues with several IB! prorallon rules for wildcat. down aml others an- to that prorallon pools be reclassllied to give "dis- covery rights" and minimum well allowables In such pools or 100 barrels per day. The commission will cut allow- No Exceptions, to Rule on Be- Binners" Enrollment Above I 933 Total and address the teacher group. Hell-Canto Ojiartet. famous ra- dio group from Dallas, Tex., will entertain the teachers during tho meeting. W. P. Hopper, social science professor at Hast Central, is presi- ident of the association. i Superintendent of 'h serves as vice PONTOTOC races New Instructors added are prov- ing necessary In lightening the too heavy load that teachers have car- jrled here for the last two years, i There Is every reason to believe it ha; this will be one of East Cen- .1......r rent increase over yes- I.Ti Employment of t years. iVrrtay. '..lately f.OO Jobless teachers In I run- able production for lhe state to. 4fll.ono barrels, a reduction of y Is 1II.100 barrels dally from the, iwn-1 August figure. j rses The recommendation was work-, are loaded also. ed out at a meeting Wednesday Many of the faculty members of state allocation committee who work with the scheduling members and operators, vear after year say that they have i As affecting the Fills Held In not seen a'heavler day than Mon- southeast Pontotoc county, eacn day was The lines -poured well will be allowed to produce through from the bell at S until! 100 barrels daily until 15 pro- au eight-hour day ended. ducers have been drilled. Audi- Hails and classrooms have been tlonal wells after have iieen brought In would mean a pro- portionate part of the total of barrels for each of group, or a reduction for well. I Well Allowable Cut 1 This provides a reduction wells going down and others an nouuced. TJel-inev et al No. Al Cratl-1 in "5---I5. is reported at beginners In the city schools ea-h feet" This WHI topped the year, hundreds of .n-rdy boys and tiim. 'i Y'O feet i K'rls fresh from loving homes Petroleum company '.Just entering a brand set- No E. Cradduck, In and cutting loose m.iny or wis at 3 SB f. feet. the ties that bound them to earl- I 'Magnolia No. 1 Norrin IJoyally lest childhood. Is drtlUns at Already Ada's city schools lmu> fuet reported enrollment of 331 "r thoiiRht of the proposal. "I am unable to understand, ft' perfectly lo.lca. that If they c do a yt h tlii> can attend. cinrk of naval do a yt h t' south American countries wan tliat ht i ad ot to to A Clark made the charge nt the munitions Investigation as ho was J. C. Shafor No. 1 Norrls In 25-2-fi is at 510 feet. J. E. Crosble No. 3 Dawcs Harden In was reported today at COO feet. H. L. Illackstock No. 2 Dawes In 30-2-7 was drilling 111 Of I freshened up during the vacation for the large classes meeting to- day for the Ilrst time this iiMiies- ter. The campus Is blight with i flowers and the activity of a full thn today at 3.410 feet. Magnolia No. 1 Dawes Hard- en In 30-2-7 was at 22400 feet; No. 2 Dawes Harden was at SIS feet and No. 3 rigging OKLAHOMA CITY. Sept. 'malely f.OO Jobless leaders In New England Oklahoma was mad esllma.ed more than 'P-- ratlves were idle ill Massjichu- se.is. Connecticut and Isl- and while employer) said not more than were Idle ir those stales. Some 2.MHKI silk workers ir teachers possible to- day by allotment to counties of 1.400 for tlie emergency federal educational program during Sep- In charge of the s.Ul, m NVash- Ington Indicated similar anot- In.ents would be ma lonthly lines. Sliike lead strike there was per cent effective and expected II would be rs S4ild 'lial 'be imme.li u 'ly Iha. tl'ey ion clusively for hiring teachers now on relief rolls. The Instructors Will conduct adult and nursery schools. college Is living to Its record of low per capita cost which was (juoted last year as being slightly above The high enrollment and the continua- tion of the biennial budget set last year when prospects for rais- ing money were meager Indeed will continue the low per capita cost for the school. A better 'son. however, for the low cost here grows out of the fact that all moneys allocated to the school are spent for the greatest hem-lit Ington. at C.lenwood. IS at Wlllard, 77 at Irving and C2 Hayes school. Supt. U. It. StubbH today relter- ated that no child will be admit-1 Dawes Hard- ted to the beginners' classes who rotary. not fully qualified to do so. The rule Is adhered to normal-, I lori (rrniMMiniliiy'oDnllJ) the Yield of 2.1 barrels per day I Announced as a well to be per well as under an agreement i drilled for the Magnolia I'e- J among operators for August tho'troleum company No. 1 Norrla "L., wells were allowed to produce; Royalty, ill cente' of southwest o( 12B barrels each dally. of northwest of 25-S-fi, liaii.found To lu. The reduction for the Hold and gas In considerable quantities and t ''a ra" .illn-mrv 1. 'for Oklahoma Is part of a testing at 1.405 feet. tlonal readjustment to a lower. The well found a show of o figure In anticipation of the usual: at 1.340 that continued until decline In consumption during comment, then added: "I'll until Farley passes on Upton Sin- challenge on Conn., to submarine, increases In prices nt L. Y.' Spear, vice president of ties bought by the farmer in coinuany said: creased steadily In advance "r l nt these beginners, six yearn old .'nil t1llnsa t1lc farmer has to sell. ll "rt {L? "m mHd discipline and undorsuuid- ft the new deal" equipped In caso we Kot Into Ing supervision of the firs' grade. There are S4 of them ;.t Wash-, am uUaculng monopoly and trouble." Spear added that It was tho If the new monopoly to 'am attacking deal wants to Its the I'nlted States policy to have South ,ll.V new deal. en was ringing up The rule Is adhered to normal-; for i Miming. n necessary i day I Announced as a well to be lwtort} enrollment In first' 'tho gas sand was topped ami No exceptions can be made the superintendent sfites. Already the enrollment In the winter months; New locations have been an- nounced for povejil places In the county. Southern Oil company's No. of 2 1 cent effective" before nlgl'lf'ill- Peter Van Horn, head of the silk manufacturers' association however, said that not more than lO.oiio silk workers were i n strike in the entire Industry that most Patterson mills wen the students by n discriminating administration. i Activity program '.s full this west of year with a complete background! Bishop for the regular clasr.rt-ork. Clubs.! Simpson, music organizations, debatt athletics are organized to supple- ment and furnish avenues for derived activity OKLAHOMA C1TV, Sept. allocations of In federal funds to be used this month in hiring unemployed were announced today Ed Morrison, state director of the federal relief educational pro-; recreation for the students. They j Idle before the strike was called, j ,.ram _ i provide means for bringing the, i" They include; Oklahoma coun-1 students Inlo closer relationship i ty Tnlsa. Semi- with each other and with the; Canadian. JSfiS; school. This leveling effect Is 1 Carter. Creek, JS40; Gar- 1 field, C.rady. ?fi24; Kay Logan. J3t'.4; Muskogee. ,JS7fl; Nowata. J17S; Okmulgee. Ottawa. J505; 1'lttsburg. ---'JBfir.; Ponlotoc. i'ottawat- had been Texas. Wash-, 25th year of national guard Woods, J223. itrlct. OKLAHOMA CITY. Sep. 1 Portland work- thousand head of live-] ers of the Oregon Worsted com- stock and 750 milk cows have' t n-inv's mill stoned and damaged been purchased for distribution an automobile driven by a mall under the FEUA rural official. Twelve arrests were made tatlon program. Carl (.lies, reports from the Fltts Held were of routine in center of northwest of' drilling, northwest of 27-3-7, has derrick! Magnolia No. _ m. N rigged up and will be in southeast corner, was readv' lo spud within a day nr reported Saturday at feet. having caught up with the De- laney and others No. Al Crad- duck In 25-2-C, reported at 3.- 023 feet. J. E. Crosble, Harden, in 30-2- 1 J. E. Cradduck'of fi04, Ada Junior B High school OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug. (.Ti__Armed with authority from. Governor M u r r a y. Walter D. llauer. Tulsa attorney and audi- tor today was commissioned to ferret out and collect large amounts of allegedly delinquent gross production taxes on oil. Murray Issued an executive or- der yesterday appointing Hauer as ferret to Investigate collections from statehood to January 1. 1931. Tlie order stated Bauer had Information on alleged un- paid taxes not known to the tax American countries equipped with ships of American types In order that In event of war. their aid as allies would be grialer. A little earlier the efforts of the submarine building company to liavtj Peru grant oil concessions In l'J20 to an American concern lu order to finance a 12.000.000 xviirsblps program bad been des- cribed today to the senate com- mittee. Letters put Inlo the record dis- closed that the boat company had sought to enlist the aid of both shipping and oil concerns In or- der to finance submarine purch- ases. Clark put the evidence In the record during the testimony ot three officials of the concern. of Aim jniiiui MI-II .-V..---- mud (axes noi KIIUWII u> of 422. Ward school '.Mirollmi-'its Or to the governor, nre- Washington 373. Gionwood were named 2fifl'. Wlllard 250. Irving .142 and gpociftcally In the order and ADA MAN HONORED Hoy Young Klerletl Vlce-l'n-ildrnl Of I'oMofflce Clet-kH to Ol Is in i r, n ,v com t e n B rtlr spud. _ i I-St Of Dawes drilling Mine Shutdown- In South Shutdowns throughout t h f south Increased both because of Individual mill owners' iicllor. and because of the action ot "flying squadrons" of strikers in forcing closedowns. At Greenville. S. C.. a flying squadron forced a closedown .it the Duncan mill operating under ;.rotertliui. Strike disorders today Included: one of the main profits from membership in an club. All of the aspects of school year nre present campus as the bells ring to No. I 7. was i "TT 2tDawes 'has announced "n 'test for tl.e, Harden. In 30-2-7. was at J.480 Ot nock No. 1 Dawes Hard- DeliievNo Cradduck. In'en. In 30-2-7. Is waiting on ce- war "iriiling today at ment after setting surface pipe. feet. J. E. Crosble No. 3 Dawes In 3.1-2-7. Is waiting on Hayes 289. making total of 1 524 in the ward ,-chools 1 02fi In the high schools. OKLAHOMA CITY. Sept. niembers of PiL P10LEB a good on the for the the dlf Harden. cement. H. L. Harden. Illackstock No. 2 In 30-2-7, is drilling MISSING GIRL RETURNS Left Home Itcctlllxe of Quarrel With Older Sister Illbb Man- closed its of fl by police. At Macon. Ga.. tht iifacturing company three mills because between pickets and a car load of office workers as they atte.iiit- led to enter the mill. Spindle. N. troops usked by mayor "for prou-ctiou of life and properly." relief head, said today. ,1 Creator returns for tTit? amoun. lidng 'invested News Classified Ails. Kiot "I Lowell LOWF.LL. Mass.. Sept. l.T) __Klotlng broke out this after- noon when a crowd of 2.Out) sur- rounded the Lowell silk mill as employes of that plant were go- (Coiitlnued on rage 8, No. .I. OKLAHOMA CITY. Sep. Judge J. F. MC- Keel of Ada, former highway commissioner, wan appointed by Gov. Murray today as a member of the state court ot tax reviews succeeding the late district Judge AMI K. Walde.i of Marietta. OAKLAND. Cal., Sept. Wanda Canllhet. 13. whose wanderings led to the belief that fll she had been kidnaped. Is home (1eptli of 937 feet, today with the explanation that, Denduem and a quarrel with her John A. Neal, In No. 3 Edwards III 2-8 Is waiting on drill pipe. Petty No. 1 McMillan in Is-Ke, IH drilling at 310 feet. (I'nint Mexhoma Oil company brought. Ill a gasser near Allen, good for million cubic feet per day, and plans to do more worl; in the area soon. The well is the No. 1 Buller, In 21-5-8 and was drilled to total: Trees No. 1 10-S-3, Just; led to her absence. 'across the line In McClaln coun- "I thought that 'f I out ,y> is now about feet on my own for a HUl" while." 'down. H Is a Wllrox test be- ,she said. "I would be better ap- jng drilled eight miles west of predated at home when l re-, rjoboe and just across the river turned." 'south from the Wanctte pool. The pretty daughler of E. H. I Oklahoma Oil company No. l Cardlnet, wealthy c.ind.v m.inu- Maytubby. In 11-23-SE. near facturer re-appeared h.st night Wapanuckn. was drilling today after an absence ot nearly 3" at 3.453 feet after setting pine hours. [recently to 3.330 feet. The wellj _.._ _. INDIANAPOLIS, Sept. Magnolia No. 1 Dawes Harden. Sam Goldstein of Fort Wayne, in'30-2-7, was drilling at 2.525 one of the orlgltm gang of feet- No Dawes Harden, also hoodlums associated with John 0'o-'0-7 was at feet and Dllllnger, has been paroled from v- No Dawes Harden. In southeast lne Htatc prison at Michigan City, "of 'northwest of northeast of 30- )t Was learned today at the office "-7 Is rigging up rotary. of Governor Paul V. McNutt. Near Wapanucka the Oklahp-, Trustees ot the prison Issued ma Oil Corp. No. i c wns iiiitfiiiMit-itrtt tcct. nor's office, and Goldstein was re- i ihTiim Gas trouble, the principal ail- ment that threatens wells drilling iln the Fltts Held sotilheast of Ada, has caused a delay at the Delaney 'and others No. A-l Cradduck, In 25-2-C. _____ Pressure of found an outlet _ betwenn surface pipe and the sev- Repairs (Continued on Page 4. No. 6) ucka the Oklaho-, Tru8tees ot the prison ssued o. 1 Maytubby. In parole Thursday, according to drilling at 3.500 information received at the gover- nor's office, and Goldstein was re- leased from the prison yesterday. He had served three years of n H L for as- witn Intent to an d bata j w u sheriff was counl> Kti.eu. lied to pc'rmlt the attorney to ex- Oklahoma nieinners m inr amlne their books. Thoy were the National Association of Affiliated Sinclair-Prairie Pipe Line com- Postofflce Employes will meei. In pany. Oklahoma Pipe Line. Gulf Shawnen next May 30. Pipe Line. Magnolia Petroleum The convenllon site was chosen and Texas company. and officers elected at llauer will receive not more here yesterday. than 12 per cent of the recovery F. of Ardmore vas as his fee. Murray's order stated, named executive coiiiiiilllm'inan of the letler carriers' association. P Ilov Itlnghnm Young of Ada f. vvaner a ot Leadership iJl jilie postoftlce clerk" an wat llalidi Harrison of Ponca City.. Mrs. Halph Harlson was clios- ien a vice president of NEW YOUK. Sept. 1--   hold his own In plcl: up H ten point lead ovfr lllll Terry of tin- New York Giants, former Nati- onal league leader. Wane.' lift- ed 1-ls average one point to League Hitting i clerks' Cotton Certificates WASHINGTON, Sept. Wallace today set a price for tax exempt certifi- cates upon cotton production at four cents a pound on the cot- ton they represented. A farm- er who sells his excess certifi- cates will be paid roughly on tlie basis of J20 per bale. Napier Colored School Opening necause of general repairs that must bo made Napier colored school will not open Monday. Scp-i tember 3, as had been scheduled.' Workmen nre encaged now In tho repairs and In -a few days expect to have the school and Its facilities In good condition and ready for tho fall term. i 'while Terry dropped 12 to Gehrlg moved up from fourth place among American league lenders to oust Heinl Manush of Washington from the top placo lie had held for weeks. Gehrlg gained poluis to while dropped to .35o many eight] nialyatok, Cles- llkowa. 04. has given birth to a boy. The infant Is 45 years younger than his oldest sister and .Is the uncle of a man J7 years older than ho. TKXTII.K STUIKK AT A (Dy Tht AuotUttd Independent surveys Indlca- led at least 230.000 out ot 050.000 workers were Idle. President lloosevelt announ- ced he would appoint a hoard lo mediate the strike. Employers In the silk, wool- en and cotton sections of the Industry planned lo organise to defend workers from allos- ed Intimidation by strikers. In New England employers closed some mills that opera- ted yesterday "to protect workers." Instances of disorder reported from Portland. Ore.. Macon. Ga.. Danlelson. Conn., Nashua. N. H.. Salem. Mam. The mayor of Spludalo, N. C.. asked for federal troops.   

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