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   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - August 30, 1934, Ada, Oklahoma                             ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 30, 1934 NEW EftST C1TI. BETTER FftCILITIES FOR FULL Concerning Tax Refunds Those Not Having Got [Re- funds Asked to See Treas- urer About Them TEXTILE STRIKE Academic Work Strengthened By Additional Professors; Two Added IIBJWJV IS STRONG Administration Desires denls to Feel Free lo Brim; Problems East CenterT.ioks forward the new school year with conn-. deuce in the belief that It will able to do more for Its student.i1 during the school year than It has been able to do in the I Ariiileiiile Work Mrengtlieneil i Two iiildltlonal professors have been employed; one In I lie de- partment of biology, and one in the department of social science. This will enable the college to do better work In two Melds in which the number of students last year was so great as to im- pose "an unduly heavy load upon the Instructional staff. This col- le-e Is In position to olf.T worl: In chemistry, physics. biology., geologv. and other sciences equal i r the'best w'.rh Offered 111 Manufacturers Refuse to Meet In Conference With Union Representatives STRIKE DEEMED CERTAIN In Race for House Speakership Although the time for tiling claims for the ad valorem tax re-j '.fund by the refund being brought about by an illegal I Treasurer Fred .Mc-j JCoy will be as lenient with tliei as possible. Any per-1_______ e, re-! Workers Firm in Demands and fund should see the treasurer D-I Refuse to Consider Com- promise Proposals see till .day. Thursday or Friday and see 'what. If anything, can be done. All taxpayers who have not al- ready paid their taxes will the refund on other IIUil I II tl I ready paid and have not .isked 'refusal to confer with union leai- for a refund are likely to lose ers to avert the threatened tex- tile amount of the refund. tile strike. Vnder the law as ..xplalimi by The position of the emp oyers Mr. McCoy, when the was ior the Industry was communlcaieu NICW YORK. Aug. The Cotton Textile Institute noti- fied the national labor relations board at Washington today of us thrown out the have nolllieil th county public Fhoul! through the newspapers and thus plenty given for asking for of time be the refund. Hut the by (leorgi Chairman A. Sloan, president, to I.loyd K. Harrison, chairman of the labor board. In his telegram, Sloan .that the Industry refused official who should "threatened" by strikes in to I will get It. Ib-bls In undergraduate ci anywhere. It has been the pur- pose of East Central In the last four years lo enlarge ils offerings In the so-called academic sub- jects- English, history, the sciences, physical science, foreign public school art. and music. These have always roll-j Btltilted a higher education, ami] they always will. A capable stun Is provided In eacli of these do-1 partments. Teachers n.....1 not, only a broad cultural education, i but' professional training as well. In a teachers college the facili- ties for professional training of major concern. This is offer-, ed through the departments of i education, psychology, and In the. training school. East Central has d reason to be proud of the men in Its departments of education and psychology. Its tialiilir: school Is one o flhe best 111 tin stated to be acced- ing to amendment of tne cotton textile code for an approximate 10 per cent Increase and wages and corresponding decrease in hours of labor for mill workers. -The government, the public the Industry are now con- 'frouted with the threat that un- Miinillie r.ipicM-malive .tosepli Jlyrns In (he fm-eiront among Democratic congressmen mentioned to ..iici-eed the late Henry T. Rainey as speaker of tlio national House ot arc Representative .lolin McDilllla ot Alabama, who was (involved III Hie bitter spc.iUorshlp fight in and Majority Leader Joseph W. Tlynu of Tennessee. It I s expected" tlio e may rxr-i t Inllitrticc lo avoid a "iloS flrM" fcf the rpcakcrshlp in thn 71th nod to OSSura harmony in the Rob and Shoot H.V. Waldroop j Of Watts in Store Hold-up OFFlClsTOllOW Find Outlaws in Camp Battle Follows, two Escaping HTiyp YOUTH Claude Hoppes Succumbs To- day to -Injury Received Tuesday Afternoon Claud Earl Hoppes, 17. w h o I was accidentally shot at his home. 41 f> East Fourteenth. Tuesday aft- ernoon, died at p. m. Wed- nesday. Funeral services will Be held at 7 o'clock this evening at tho Crls- well Funeral home, Rev. O. H. Lee, pastor of the Presbyterian church, officiating. The body will be taken to tie- osho, Mo., for burial at the side of his mother, who died early this i year, Claude was born at Wentworth, Mo.. May 2fi. 1917. and came to his family In 1928. He Sinclair and Meriman Head Opposing TickeU in Cali- fornia, Johruon Wins B1BSE nNTJBO BEHIND Johnston First in South Caro- lina Race, Stephens In Missiuippi WATTS, Okla., Aug. 25 Dennis Morris, escaped ma convict and gunman, was led In a gun buttle with Adatr county officers near here early _..................... today, after Morris and two com- Hayes ward school, panlons had shotand Junior high school and Ada high He was active as ft Hoy Scotlt and was ono ot the best toved members ot Troop 5. He wan a I'ttllU'lin uuit i...... H. V. Waldroop, Watts merchant, during a robbery of his store. State penitentiary guards from McAlester, with bloodhounds, and officers from A iirl> have attended to this overlooked tho matter, and Mr. McCoy did not know of it until last Friday .evening. As soon he get the i Information, he says he Informeii 'the newspaper men and the in went to the I tl H'I1 I Mr McCoy says he liopes law is changed and !everv' one entilhd to the money immediately the industry will be closed by strike and kept i closed until changes are character of such a strike 'is clear. "If It Is to bo an approved and successful weapon for changing the code or forcing governmental action it will set a precedent for rstrikes In every other Industry. Believed Agreement on Kelicli wlu put u premium 1 L .1 nu Program For Oklahoma Day by Day Happenings in Pontotoc County Oil Fields Will Be Reached MIC on force and violence as Instrument or law making instead of the ord- erly processes of the National In- dust rial Recovery Act." UefusliiR further to deal with (ration and relief Ifrinii A few hundred feet more on two wells In the John Fills field In southeast Pontotoc county an't the eyes of oil Interests in this section will be focused on them to see what they will do. The Magnolia No. 1 Cradduck In the southeast corner of 24-'--'' wa.s drilling this morning at 520 feet. The Delaney and others NO. Al Cradduck. In 25-2-fi, was at feet. The Delaney No. i Cradduck, In the northeast cor- 'ner of 23-2-fi, Is producing froti !a total depth of feet. The I [Magnolia test Is an offset to the 'sio'Vnl Cradduck Is'a qmirter ot a mile j to the southwest of the producer.] Magnolia No. 1 Uorrls Ko.valty In 23-2-0. is drilling at l.l-l threatening ,feet- leaders on j "In view of this situation we nroblenis unable to southwest. ience with the group threatening 30.2.7. MapnoHa No 1 heller trilnin- school al any In-, expected first to strike. Harden Is at l.fiOr. feet mitutlon lir Oklahoma. ian'informal talk with Harry L. said he considered MapnoUa N-o. 3 Dawes Har- I'oiir I'.eliiMi i Hopkins, the federal relief admin- Amendment under strike threat as ,s cement after S.-II..I.N Istrator. who announced only yes- Im.ilIllllK "absolute destrucllon surface pipe to S28 feet. Althou-h tb.-re Is no provision terday the administration of re- system." j H. L. Illnckstock No. 2 time in tills state Oklahoma would be return- j chairman Garrison had Hcrden. In 30-2-7. was at J.fiSU ed to the governor's office industry heads to confer (f< Marland's inauguration, assuming representatives of the Cot-; Mlll. election. i on Textile Workers union either In the liem Hopkins months ago removed or tomorrow In an effort to from the present governor. n strike of nearly lialf a Ham H. Murray, any authority workers after Labor Day. over federal relief In bis stale. Sloan said he would be glad to Discussing tin- new prospective with the board to governor. .Marlaml, the adinlnls- further the Industry s 1 Htnnd either tomorrow or any In was at feet. Magnolia No. 1 Norrls Royalty In 2'1-2-r, set 10-Inch to 1.2U4 feet and Is wnlllng on cement. J E. Crosbie No. Dawes Harden, In was at 400 feet Saturday. H. L. IllackstocU No. 2 Dawes I Harden, In :'.0-2-7, was at 2.8U5 I feet. Magnolia No. 1 Dawes Harden, was drilling Saturday 'at feet. Activities continue, too, In oth- er localities In this area. In the liebee field, Mldcontln ent No. Mllllgan, In 25-5-4, halted at 2.2tiO to set 81 Inch I pipe, and the Mldokla No .Mercer, In 24-5-4. was reported !lo have feet of oil In the I bole. j Petty et al No. 1 McMillan, in Is drilling at 280 feet. Kroeger and Gillette No. 1 Duncan, in nfi-1-0. Is at fills feet, drilling In lime and shale. Oklahoma OH Corp. No. 1 Maytubby, In ll-2s-8e, was ream- Ing down to feet. lates ot Morris, who escaped dur- jlng the gunflght. One of the m  11 H'111 ttidi authority not limited by general i probably good for "production. j Edwards. In, 27-2-R. north of Tu I production at the preseat tune getting eight-Inch He took the position that slnco under nn agreemen: by :caslnR at .j_goO feet and Is walt- i which wells capable of pro.tiicmg j on coment; and the Jack !125 barrels of oil or mons daily i.yncii No. 1 Thompson, In 'arc I to make s the claim h 1 Washington i.! olas said. "1 am going to write was prevented by Nicb- blni calling who Hopkins' state- attitude of the I vilil- Jill III 111 1 i i juillllly pIIlCCS Mill bad occasion responsibility upon Giles and full 'erefore feels authority to make any necessary in offer stu-1 changes." istr cti n and promised the bouse 'delegation yesterday he would that It Is in dents competent............ capable administration service.-. The president and secretary of the in-tiiulion extend an Invlt.i- ion to students to discuss any problems which they may h. M with them. Sometimes it is pos- to render assistance through these oflices. C. -a and courteous service In all d' i :so. 1 Simmons In center of the I west half of northwest of north- iwest ot 8-3-G Is drilling at 8G2 feet. FRANCISCO. Aug. __ I'pton Sinclair, soclolis: Immediate Inquiry to j author turned democrat, and act- whet her relief could Governor Frank F. Merrlam. make an determine broadened and expedited houia In Okla- The Oklahomans appeared fair- republlcan, piled up Increa.' totals today In the race for It hopes to maki this a ly well satisfied with that pro- gram, but some of them are going to remain here a few days longer to "start agi- i what they reality, i describe as Improvement is made In the relief situation. and courteous TeaciiVrs 'college, latlng again" Central -....niv Hesrribe as Imnrove WEWOKA. A unique lish Aug. was displayed here Caught on "Hoggy Creel: by an Indian farmer, the fish bad a full set of teeth, resembling In and appearance those of a rat. Only Its head the common typ< gubernatorial nomination of their j barrels of oil or mons daily _....... _ limited to that figure ami ln tools. unable to produce lha.j Xear Latta school the Al Spears are allowed to produce up to their capacity. In the nebee field, the Mid continent NO. Mllllgan, In 2.. was drilling Thursday night i "Sailor'and Vlersen No. 1 waler. Plugged back to 2.100 Oll No. i Maytubby. in feet The well had shows in of northeast of soutn sami at to feet and ot 11-2S-8E, near Wapan- ncka has cemented pipe to the Wllcox sand at 3.390 feet. A number of Individuals here "toi believe the well will make a al- producer, and If It does It will from 2.070 to feet. Fitts field southeast of Ada seek get an Increase In the daily parties. Sinclair's colorful which he said brought victory to President Roosevelt's "new deal" piled up the most Imposing vote in Tuesday's voting. His total ot llowahle from the field, now set open another canipaigni.it 1.000 barrels of oil dally, dril- possibility for ling and plans for still more j In drilling continue. llette No. 1 Magnolia No. 1 Cradduck, In I'ontotoc, Is in Tuesdays _ with nearly four fifths I 24-2-f.. was drilling Saturday at large area as a oil developments, the Kroeger and Gil Duncan, north of running pipe to B50 a and Import duties to eliminate, the bootlegger will be proposed In the next congress by a group of representatives who led the repeal fight. The fact that tho treasury lias not reaped the harvest of revenue expected from liquor sales and the continuance of large-scale bootlegging prompted the move Proposals to restore the old domestic rate of a gallon on 100 proof liquor, and to slice the J5 a gallon tariff by 50 per cent are being considered by ex- jpcrts attached to the house ways ".nil means committee. Secretary Morgenthau has Indl- atod ho Is opposed at ipreselit to any reduction In the existing lomestlc tax. He Is seeking to kill tho Illicit traffic by a large orcc ot Internal revenue agents. Tho representatives plan to await developments In Morgen- :hau's campaign. If It Is suc- cessful ibetween now and January 1, they may delay their drive for lower taxes. Should he fall, the leaders say they .will push for a reduction. republican honors, but he told the Asrociated Press he had no political ambitions. Welcoming newspapermen to Ills desk today, he made clear the depths of feeling that'promp- ted his statement. His Identity with what has been termed "the Hoover wing" of tho party raised questions whether the former president would feel called upon to express themselves. Former Vice President Curtis had no comment. Although Hen- of the precincts reported 1 "5.000 above that of his I'ear- est rival, George Creel, war time was similar of fish. LUCAS IN HOSPITAL 1'oncn City PosUim-tler In Failing director of propaganda, and 'JO.-J Health in Cure JQOO above the conservative re-1 publican whom he will oppose In GUTHR1E, Aug. <.T) I Frank It. Lucas, CO, Ponca City associate Stephens county has produced hie best grade of wheat on the Fort Worth market this v-arV Grown by A. D. Jolin-on who lives southwest of here, the wheat lested 1S.S7 cent pro- tein. postmaster and a close lnlof E. M. Marlaml. the governor- nominate, was In a hospital here today. Lucas, who has not been In tho best of health for several years, was ordered to the hospital by Dr. Clarence Petty, of Guthrle. his friend of many years. I Fear was expressed by some California democratic leader.-, that conservative voters opposed to Sinclair might swing their .-nitre vote from the democratic to the lepnbllcan ticket, cutt'.ng Intotlie state's party delegation ot 11 in congress. The author, however, consider- ed his victory a (infinite swir. Greater returns Tor the amount invested News Clarified Ada. to tion. the Roosevoltian administra- feet, having reported a show of rlS7 feet. 'nil after topping what Is be- 'Delaney ct al No. Al Cradduci: (o be the Wllcox sand at "in the Rebec field. Stanollnd No. 1 Walker. In 21-5-5, has plugged bock and cemented plP Cotton (irouers According to a telegram re- ceived this morning from the Extension Department, Mon- day, September 5 P. m. will be" the closing date for sign- Ing of application for Tax Ex- emption Certificates on cot- ton. All farmers, who have not signed applications to sell Tax Exemption cotton should do so by that date or they will receive no tags for their cotton. feet to test out a Rood u J. E. Crad the to 2.C.50 show In Viola lime Magnolia No. 1 duck. In 24-2-fi. still leads .way In wells now drilling In Uic Fitts field, drilling now at et al No. 1 Al Crad- duck. in 25-2-fi. Is at 3.621 feet, i havlnp topped Hunton lime at Crosbie No. 3 Dawes Harden. In 30-2-7. has sot 13 5-8 (Continued oiv Page No. 8) Forest Fires Take Enormous Toll in State OKLAHOMA CITY, Aug. recent rains have pimctipd forest fires, the drought ry P. Fletcher likewise has trained from making public his opinion. It was obvious that he must weigh the league In tho light of his duties as republican national chairman. Hurley's text follows: "Various of my friends have been Inquiring of me If I have or I Intend to affiliate myselt with the American Liberty League. "My answer Is that I emphati- cally "will not do BO! "The Liberty League Is finan- ced by the same people and led by the same man that led the campaign; and I have never Joined a 'smear gang. "I deeply regretted seeing such splendid statesmen as Wads- 78.888 votes to votes lo. the "drys." Blea.se. In Ilun-cm In the same ptuto. the vetoMti political flRtire. Colo I., lllcase, who seeks the democratic nomi- nation for governor ran secono to a young Spartanburg lawyer. Olln D. Johnston, but wor. a place In the runoff primary to lie held two weeks from yester- day Six Incumbent members ot the house of representative-l- one ot whom had no opposition checked torest fires, period saw about acres jurned over In eastern Oklahoma, State Forester George R. Phillips said today. "From the standpoint of the number ot fires It Is tho worst year we have ever had.' said Phillips. "Had It not been for the aid of CCC workers I think ninety per cent of the wooded area of the state would have been worth. Smith and Davis taken In by tho old 'smear brigade.' "This Is a government by ma- jorities. The American congress and executives represent a ma- jority of the people. 'When the polltlces of cong- ress nnd the executives are dis- tasteful to the electorate, a ma- jority can change both policies and personnel. "In my own short lifetime, i have seen many such changes take place. Unless I miss my guess, In appraisal of tho di- rection in which wo are headed, (Continued on Page 8, No. 3) UI1I7 "I __were renomiitiled. on tho basis ot returns early today. Mississippi democrats favoreo Senator Hubert D. Stephens for renamlnatlim (equivalent to rer election 1. but It appeared that he would not have a clear am- Jorlty, and consequently would be thrown into a runoff primary with former Governor Theodoro G. Illlbo. Ross Collins war tao third man In this race. COLUMBIA. 3. C., Aug. 1.007 of 1.474 pre- clncts reported from advisory refnrendum on prohibi- tion, the weis held a lead ot over 10.000 The count was for retention of ftate prohibition. 9.230. ag'ilnst, 89.B81. A Wl l) V t V f majority of li.OOO In Charleston antl-prohlbltlon county shot total far ahead. Vanishing l.otH RICHERHEAD. N. a four year search for three lots which he bought for at the Suffolk county tax sale in 1930. Andrew Anderson reported the lots have vanished. The-board of supervisors aujn- orUed the county treasurer, to refund the purchase price. It was not explained why tho vlous owner paid taxes on .ap- parently Imaginary propertr.   

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