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Ada Weekly News Newspaper Archive: July 19, 1934 - Page 1

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   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - July 19, 1934, Ada, Oklahoma                             THE ADA WEEKLY NEWS CITIZENS TO ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, JULY 19, 1934 PIONEER RANCHER AND SHOWMAN NUMBER 16 TO EN STRIKE Strikers Make Offer to Arbi trate Differences With Former Employers CITY'STILUjUIET Food Blockade Broken and Supplies Beint; Brought in Under Restrictions A number of automobiles, nu- tin- elad.-rshlp of C. W. will leave here Friday morning Hhortly art.-r 7 o'clock anil nmke a -wing around through John- ston nullity In the Interest of the randldacy of Tom D. McKeoWn, Mr. announced expects I" liavt- or .Vl ram filh-il with boosters for MI-J congressman. hand of or 'JO pit-cos and pl.-'nty of speakers will IK- used In entertaining and informing the voters at each stop. cars will go down IH and bark around on highway FILEDMIT 0. U. The -wing County Attorney Takes Action Against Neal Myers in Mills Death Case CHARGE FOLLOWS HUTOPSY Myers Believed Trying to Make Way Across Rio Grande Into Mexico San FKANCISCO. .Inly Twn vital collide, ,e. her-. today in effon- Immediate s'-lllenienl Till strike. Mediators. em-oiir; strikers' offer "r sought anil iiiK tlir iiniiiii re '-I' were called i ill Hi'- g''11' -ed by t'ie urldd-iition. means of bring- le-cntatiM-s and together fur a l.-rinlnatii f "all, nut in- volving 101'. "Oil Ill'-ll i" til'1 region. Tllf shipowners Were Id con- sider I In- proposal of Hi'' gein-r ll strike committee lor mediation the niiirlthiK- strike. Involving 27.0IMI workers along tin- I'ncif'c coast. Tin- shipowners previously lu-il agreed 10 arbitrate with tin1 In- ternational Longshoremen's asso- ciation Ijiit had n-iii-'-il arbitric Hi, ii wlili Hi'- other striking maritime unions. Kxplulnliig Ilicir positions. tl'.'-y asserted "Hi'1'" nniOll.- were not representative of th'-ir Mayor Aug'-lo Kos.-l anil oilier mediators gathered. Discussion oT union lalior's rt-solntlon yesterday arliitratlon gave us something work on." said Mayor liossl. "We know that the unions willing H> ilo anil an- wail MIL- see how tin- shipowners f alioul II." IT STftTE ISSUE li.. W. Marland Issues Statement J Of Views in Address It Democratic Women "Tulv 1X--I 'I'- NOU.MAN. July murder charge wan filed today against Neal Myers, missing I'nl- verslty of Oklahoma student. In connection with the death of -Mar- ian Mills, 20-year-old campus beauty the victim of an al leged'attempt to prevent mother- hood. At the same time County At- torney I'aul I'pdegraff who filed the charge In the court of Jtlstlc of the Peace J. D. C.rlgsby. said I lie would release Hazel llrown fraternity house cook, If she cat aj furnish J2.SOO ball as a malerla i. I witness In the case. t The food blockade In the i region meanwhile was broken. with trucks bringing in hn.-e, loads of fre-.li produce, meats i othi-r foodstuff-. Some biiti-In-i- shops hen- opened their doors for Hie day will: special union permission. Meanwhile Chief of I'olice Wil- liam J. Ijnlnn issued terse orders to "keep the streets clear of loaf- ers and vagrants." and the na- tional guard concentrated its force of T.OIlii men along fie waterl rout. Chl'-l ijnlnn's orders followed extensive attacks by ami police on known communistic meeting places. Observers said they .-aw union buttons on the caps of many men among t'rfe crowds which demol- ished the radical Tin- records of the more ti.an "mi men arrested in the raids were being to de- termine whether any of them can s deported aliens. Ce.K .Mm The police raids against munists in tin- glon, brought District Adorn that etlorts would I have all radical alien lie and "vigilante" tin- alleged (oni- San Fr.un-lsi- a promisi Matthew made caught in the round up deported. of men were four arrested mid score, in a stn-et llarenp la which occurred a-- police led lo iV-per-e crowds listening to an a-sert'-d coimuuni.-t oratot. Tin- most s. rioiisly injured was a bystander who-.- -honlder broken a" In- was knot ked down and trampled by iln- crowd. Tin- Tour jaib-d included two mil" d Slat.-., -oldiers. Itoya! lirant and Harold Fish. wb... police refused to on." In Oakland and li.-rl.eley Ibreatein-d tour i .-siauranl.- i-d by Iln- e.i-! bay citizens emer- gency committee bill poliC" arr'm--1 before any of the were damaged. While declaring no lessening of the general in the east bay cities was j.lanned. William H. t tie Alameda county labor council. .-aid tin- actions of San Fran- i-lsco strike coiiimlttee were be- ing watched clo-ely. He Intima- ted that tin- east bay union.' would follow the bad of their embattled fellow workers across Hie bay. Uelief that strikers may need protection" from the fuiv of citi- zens" unless the walkout in the bay region, now In Its thirl day here. Is ended was expressed Iiy" Acting ('.memo- Flank Merrimn of California. "Three hundred men In OaV land wanted to arm themselves and go after the sinker.-." tin California executive said in an address at Colusa. "I am not go- ing to advocate anything lhat but I feel tin- people have a rlgM I" ex.-rci.-e tb- M'lrif thii' marked tin- activities of their forefatin-rs and determine questions for themselves. In .--uch an event the state, will have to protect the strikers as well as the ulhc.r nee fin- governor, (old a group of democratic women who nn-l here j today. i He spoke to approximately i delegates to the state meeting of j the Oklahoma Democratic Wom- en's council at a meeting In his home. The statement was M.irland's first public expression on the pro- hibition question during his can- didacy for governor. He was class- ed as' a "wet" candidate when he rin for congressman In the nor- mally republican Klghth District two years ago. see by the press that the re- publican party in the state is con- sidering the advisability of raising the wet and dry .Marland I said. "There seems to be some un- 1 certainty in Its rangs as to whe- ther it is advisabb to raise the Issue at all and if the issue Is raised as to which side the re- publican party is to take. "To my mind tills Is not a poli- tical Issui: at all In Oklahoma. The democratic party had never con- Idered It a political issue in the late and I hope that tin- parly will maintain that attitude." Helical Political Milder Marland added thai whether there should be repeal of tntlonal prohibition was an Indl-; not a political matter. 1 Tin- nominee repeated his In- leiitlon to appoint a group of coni- inllte. s to aid in drafting his legislative program, Investigate problems of Oklahoma farmers, suggest relief measures, analyze the state budget, study an edu- cational program, study natural resources of the state. Inquire in- to necessity for subsistence home- steads and suggest plans for de- velopment of such homesteads in every county win-re needed. He announced plans to name a committee to study the old age pension problem and recommend legislation. Taxation will be stud- ied by another committee. Uy" starting the committees to work next November, much valu- fidin abb- time will he saved If the; liradv legislature approves the program planned. Marland said. He told tin- women his address I today was his last opportunity to press his plans and policies, lie is leaving for Washington after next Tuesday's primary election to confer with President liooseveit in an effort to oblaln approval of In public works pm- jects for this winter. W. H. EBEY IN Defies Decision of Supreme Court Declaring Him In- eligible to Hold Office Ada Legislator Will Be Race For Speaker if Rc-nominatcd in I LETTER MEET CLOSE DECLAREWIAL Lieutenant Governor Issues Orders Countermanding Orders of Langer lllSMAKKrN. D.. July I Two men acting as governor of North Dakota clashed In exercise of executive authority today as With many prospective mem- bers of the legislature writing him to In-come a candidate fori speaker of the house In the next session, W. H. Kbey announced this morning that he had con-i sentcd to make tin1 race In case, he is re-nominated and elected, i Many of the legislators from I counties having state Institutions are anxious to have a speaker j from an Institution town. Thusi far no one from such a town has] announced, and thus the pressure has .been bron -In the race. Lieutenant Governor Ole H. Olson, Mr. Kbey, having served sever- acting governor by court order. I terms, has a wide acqualnt- called on the adjutant general's and Is a personal friend of f f 1 c e to withdraw national I nil the law makers who nave guardsmen and end state wide Vrvcd within recent years. He martial law ordered by William Iwlll start In tin- campaign wll.i Langer. recently convicted .of a J hunch of friends ri-a.ly Adjournment to Come This Afternoon When All Busi- ness Disposed Of BANQUET PROM ENJOYED Congressmen Tom McKcown And Will Rogers Amontj Morning Speakers been there for a day and a half using a quack remedy In a frantic effort to balk maternity. "The autopsy report finds from an examination of all vital organs that the girl did not die a natural death and that death was caused by an attempted said r'pdegraff. explaining the com- plete report of post mortem ex- aminers would not be available until Saturday because of a neces- sary chemical analysis. Search for Myers, who fled the Drown duplex after calling a doc- tor on July 10 and later abandon- ed his motor car near Houston, Tex., centered near Urownsvllle, Tex., and Matamoros, Mexico. I ike -ill the pioneers oV his Ilk, Colonel Zack Miller of Hit- famed 10 I li'anch never admits defeat. Today, he Is t" make his visl 101 llanch properties recover their losses, despite the. handicaps ol'the depression and another drouth. The ranch was recently re- organized, but Miller's wild west show remains Idle. lucky breaks, pioneer hopes to have the show on tin; road Home ilav. II' With by adjournment of their convention scheduled lo the lat- ;ht to get Mr. I-.be> hers ol the Oklahoma Hural let- ter Carriers association and les Auxiliary today continued ih'i program which began Monday morning. One of the big occasions of llio was the banquet Mou- nt tin; First Uiiutlnt Asphalt Mill Near Ada Ready To Put Product on Market Now Mill Can Prepare Natural Product at Rate of 40 Tons Per Hour, Ideal Surfacing For Many Roads and Streets With Tough, Enduring Qualities. noon. For the time being It was un- certain whose orders would be fol- lowed. National guardsmen, a r m e d with bayonets, were scattered throughout the statehouse, still acting under Langer's martial law .order Issued last night. Although 'anger declared martial law to cov- ler the entire state. ISIsmarck was the only city where guardsmen were used. Assistant Adjutant H. A. (the organization. As soon as the primary Is over, if Mr. Kbey Is nominated, he will begin an active campaign and ex- pects to go to Oklahoma City in January with enough supporters to become speaker with little con- test. "We're ready to -o the, which conveys It to a hammer- copp called out the troops Its (night on orders from I.anger. jutant Onurnl Kurlu Sarles expected to take, charge of JHlluntlon Hoon. Hrocopp received Olson's order liro- last Ad- was tin; jjnilar Army Officer cumbs Monday to Long Siege of Illness NOU.MAN. July The exact cause of the death of Mar- Ian .Mills, former I'nlverslty of i Oklahoma beauty queen, who a week ago In the home of a fr.i- Icrnlty cook, still baffled 'gators today. I I The cook, Mrs. Hazel IJrown. who is held as u material ness, told aulhorllles the girl bad attempted to prevent moth- erhood with quack remedies. Dr. Cuy Y. slty professor of his tests would not be completed before Saturday. He compared his millings with those of Dr. Hugh Jeter, of the university1 'medical school last night, after a post mortem examination and i they agreed that so far the cause of death had not been found. County Attorney Paul Upde- graff, after conferring with the 'doctors, said the case could he cleared up quickly If Neal Myers, young pharmacy student sought in the lor questlonln be found. Myers traced to Houston last Thursday, thus far has evaded pursuit, despite the plea of father, an Kl Hono physician, that he surrender. DROUTH REFUGEES Hanenkratt and Harry Harndol-j lar have been working for two months to Install a mill and get the quarry ready for production. Tuesday the mill was busy run- ning samples of the asphalt which now goes on the market as a surfacing material which the operators believe will find a real place because of tin- prop- erties of the material found One of the advantages of the iroduct here Is in tin- fact that, treatment, no materlal to make up for deficiency. Instead, it is ready for use as it comes from the mill. In Its natural form the asphalt Is hardened, but when it is -shot' loose from the wall of the quar- ry with dynamite it is easily pulverized and when It. is milled Into proper fineness it is 'live so that when It is stirred it stirs ,and moves for a time. I Laid on a road surface, grad- ed level and then rolled, tin- as- Iphalt makes a compact, tough, An elevator carries the pulver-lfore acting. material up and pours it In-1, Whose orders members of the to a revolving screen. Pieces .legislature woulfl follow remained too large to he screenod return [problematical. Langer In a lele- lo the 'mill, the other pouring (gram last night Informed them to o e steadily into a truck bed below, j convene Thurmlay. Olson today In one test Tuesday the asphalt wired the legislators lie had tiled w is milled a' the rate, of four a proclamation with the secretary six minutes, or forty tonsjof state revoking Langer's special Ions in an hour, i to where i facing. i Mr. Hanekralt It can then be hauled it Is to be used for aur- Is a road con- Sergeant William Uhikesley tiled Monday evening at at his home north of Ada after a protracted Illness. Funeral services will be cnn- afternoon i- First'H; Morris lllmv laid to rest In Itosn- dale cemetery with military hon- in charge of the National guardsmen was handed personally American Legion. C" .call. The order to withdraw as handed Olson to Drocopp. the in I here tiack remedies. ]u Williams, Fnlver- anv of chemistry, said f detlcien jby Olson to Drocopp. 'surviving deceased ore Ills' Iractor of many years Leaders In the Olson group said daughter, mother and familiar with every type of Sarles refused structlon and surfacing. Mr. liarndollar is associated with In the frojert of placing Pontotoc" county product on market as a material well adapt-1 ed lo the needs of much ot highway Improvement work Oklahoma. Driiioiixtriitlnii Here Ada citizens will HOOII see to accept Olson's order revoking martial law. It was possible the federal government would be asked for 1 i soldiers lo restore order. I The slate supreme court in Its late yesterday neld that him the. _ Datives residing In ii-veriil hundred cur- yen and- guests -.vi-ru a delightful pro- to do gram. Dr. A. I.lnticheld, president or Knst Central college, was at his best as loaslmaster. The Ad.i high school orchestra opened til" program with music after whlc.li U. K. Katllff. president of the Pontoloc county association, cal- led the meeting lo order. i H. D. llamlell of Knld gave the Invocation. Miss Cleo Stuut'-r. with a vocal solo, and Miss Calh- rlne ljualls. with a reading, de- llghled the audience. Then came the notary Trio. Dr. W. K. Dean, J. I. .McCanley and Denver Dnvlson. who eiiter- Italned with their customary iiuc- c cess. Fred Fauntleroy. with u specialty number, was the HIIIIIO Fred Ada 1ms known for years 'and a master of entertainment. Tin.- principal speaker of the 'eveiilnc was Clifton J. llrown. Franklin. TIMID., national secre- tary of the It. L. C. A. This moruliiK'K joint session began with a memorhil service In which tfie convention paid re- rienioon sped to the memory of carriers, nilm church, their wlveu mid-other near rel.i- lives who died since the convon- llon a year C. H. Hess, McAlester, pretd- dent of the state organization ot county commissioners, spoke for a time. Committee work followed. Hon. Tom D. McKeown. >it New Ada, Fourth district congress- man, and Hon. Will lingers, of Oklahoma Clly. roiicri-ssiiiaii-.it- in i demonstration of the material, ship, hence could THELBERT is OKLAHOMA CITY. i.lv Tln-Iberl I'.rady. who was ex- onerated a vear ago of participat- ion In an Arkansas bank robbery by his outlaw cousin. "Ilig Hoy" li'ob I'.rady. today was granted a leave from state's prhon. Mc- Alester. where he had served less than ten months of a five-year sentence for robbery. He was sentenced at N.-wklrk on a pl'-a of guilty soon after he won a fight against exti-.nliHi.il isk'-d by Arkansas officials. The -cull-nee' followed an attempted burglary of an Klks' club sale at Hlackwi-11. Hill H'-nsley of Okla- homa City, "'ho pb-ad'-d guilty with llrady. still Is serving a five- year sentence. The leave stated llrady is need- -d at Kl Keiio to aid In support of his mother and sister. GRAND LOW MI'SKOCKK. July 1   EI'TUa? ,to defraud the fulled States gov- 'T. "h installiition nf new ernment. a felony under the led- Canal H wl was to be a feature of the rlos- a'.eral law, took away his citizen- Pershing expedltlon th. of uriei t u .u acLs was to reject a proposal to try to get exemption for rural letter re- carriers from payment of BUHO- I line tax. u.itij II.n rights as an elec- Into Mexico after t'u1 at- onstratlon ol me maiei -uu.: snip, nence ins us an N M. When the operators having agreed some tor, and that therefore he was not hro'ke out h" tiu.e ago to furnish the material eligible to continue to serve as H not bclnK sent for patching of gaping holes In jKoveinor. STIHT1 FflCES OKLAHOMA CITY. July of head of across the water. He tallied In the 1'nlted States to drill recruits, a duty someone had to perform, if an army was to he whipped into shape for service. He was stationed at Ada about 1" years ago in connection wlt.i is training the National C.uard of Ok'la- this area and for several years homa cattle faced starvation and was custodian of the gmvrti death as heat and drought com- erty. (I'riini llnlljl Vlnlta was selected Tuesday las the scene of the 19115 cfinven- tion of Oklahoma Rural Letter and the Ladles Auxiliary. i In the closing hours of their harmonious sessions In Adn Hi.) Auxiliary reelected Mrs. C. O. I Merrill ot Perry president 'Jt the state organization, chose MM. A. .1. Plunkltt of Checotah vlce i president and Mrs. FllxwatlT, lif demand for years to come, and it is tin- hope of Hanenkratt and liarndollar that this natural re- source will Ilnil a ready market GO TEMPBUIT Three Dnys (if 1 05 Followed by Two of 1 Of) nml No Uclif Here Today ll'min llnllj) Al :i o'clock l.'dny the ofliciiil d water wells. of disease. Reports here today were lhat was a splendid type more than 000 head of western young manhood and made I- been shot during Ills resldenci a futile fodder and head havi Iheriiioinele crees. lilghol mer tlius fur. recorded murk for HIT de- Ihe snni- Administrator Terms Such Act- ion Civil War; Issues Warn- ing to Labor r.KKKKLKvTcMif.. July i.l-i "Civil war" Is Hugh S. Johnson's name for the gener.il Oklahoma cattle havi down already after search for water and that more than been shipped to other sections of the state In an effort by cattle men and federal relief directors, to save them. Itnless rain falls soon, dreds more will he destroyed and thousands of others will be ship-] ped to areas .where the drought s less severe. Six Oklahoma counties already ire In the federal emergency 1 drought relief area and federal of in in th San 'Francisco bay statisticians estimated today that latlons unless there Is a let-up In the Hale a drought, all western Oklahoma as kee's recent rontotoc county's late has been such all that can be done weather of that about about It perature Ims averaged 101 grces here. With the mercury rllinhlr.3 to above 1 1II decrees In narts ot Oklahoma and temperatures bom- barding the century mark irim Texas to. the Dakotas. corn and pastures bore the brunt of the latest damage from the droutn that has covered Arkansas, Kan- sas, Oklahoma, Missouri 'ind Texas for from one to '.wo months. Kktannlng. Pa. Hep. N- I- Strong, seeking a tenth term in congress, is a republican, which explains his alphabetical history of the Fnlted States: K. D. N. n. A.: rj4 C. W. A.; I. O. U.: U. O. 1'. of extreme heat until Nature sees (It to deposit a relieving rainfall here. K.xtreme temperatures Have not been just occasional of late but have been consistent. Fri- day, Saturday and Sunday re- corded temperatures of an.l Monday and Tuesday surpassed hat with HIP, degrees. strikes area. "The right of dissatisfied men to strike against a .recalcitrant employer is the NUA chief 'said yesterday In an ad dress at the Fnlversity of Call fornia. "This government has 'supported it ami will support It to the limit. the general 1 strike is quite another matter. ill n EFFORT liOE TO E1JK STRIKE M1NNF.APOL1S. July new federal drive to settle tb'1. strike of union truck drivers be-j gall today. Father Francis J. Hass, a member of tin- federal labor re- board who helped nego- peaceful end to Milwau- electric strike, was llrilUglll. ail western UHI.IIHMIHI i .....7...... well as other sections will be from .n a Mrs. Uert K. ItatUff of Adti. member of the state executive committee, was elected as spec- ial delegate to tins national con- vention which will meet III Deli- ver. Colo.. August 20. The national organization will hear the expense of the deleiaU1. an honor accorded the Oklahoma Auxiliary for having attained, a i membership of 5S1. Mrs. Kntlltt was chosen by ballot. The liural Letter Carriers ami '.the Ladles AmUI'Ty of j county wish to express their ati- i precla'tlon of the assistance nun Ico.ipeiation of the nil-IU i Chamber of Commerce. HnpMst church for the use of their build- Ings, and all who participated. In tin- programs to make their I'ta'.'? j government move to :ttl" tin' Under the federal relief plan.'drivers' walkout, which ha  me street and sl.oot liinoceut (Continued ou S, No. 1.) destroyed summarily. The otlnirs are sent to pastures In other areas for reconditioning and pro- cessing for relief purposes, Most of the Oklahoma catti- purchased for shipment has been sent to the Osage. Even in that area, however, stock water was reported low and pastures but per cent of normal. K. D. Illood, federal crop statistician here, re- ported lhat pastures In US cou-- tles are suffering from drought damage, condition ranging gener- ally from 5 to 25 per cent ot Normal, with scores of catllemet partment conciliator, nml C.'jver- nor Floyd II- Olson In their ef- forts to arbitrate the matter. National guardsmen were In eadlness In the downtown dH- rlct to stop any disorders. Striking union workers toured he downtown streets In cars, but vlth I M. Wnlk'-r. TUhomlnso. nres'ldenl: John McAlesler. vice president; O. Dempsey. Chlcka-ba. secretary: Homer llurkliarl. Ada. treasurer. Delegates to national conven- tion from this district: Mr. ati'i [Mrs. Hurt Ilalllff. reporting that water Is hatiled for their herds. few trucks moving, th-re MFSKOC.KK. July 1 j, 20, of Tahle- 'quail, sweetheart of a t'J-year- ,.lrl m..ir death aK the result all Illegal operation. manslaughter chargen to- vis little occasion for disorder. connection with her ut- Newspaper, gasoline uml mil'< tempt to avert motherhood. ind market gardners' trucks were Davis. 27. also charceil In the tie-up, which I.H-JWIIH manslaughter In the caBf, u at midnight Monday. I was released on ._... Dr. Edward When the girlhood sweeili.-art allegedly ne.rforiii- ot 7.aro Acha. late old man ol If operation, drowned hlm- Turkey. learned of his death, sl-ei 12n, so sh old (Ml (I I HI T, self rather than face arrest after IICK. :-ii'- the girl's screams attracted .la- couldn't have dit-u ot to houiu Mondajr. of shock. She was onlv   

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