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Ada Weekly News: Thursday, May 10, 1934 - Page 1

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   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - May 10, 1934, Ada, Oklahoma                             THE ADA WEEKLY NEWS VOLUME XXXIV ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, MAY 10, 1934 NUMBERS President Makes Clear His Views on Silver; Message On Debts Coming WILL Mm BILL Green Endorses LaFollette Public Works Bill Calling For Ten Billion WASHINGTON. May Tin; Roosevelt attitude on war debts and was redefined hi part for n listening worlil today at the White House. At the capltol end of Pennsyl- vania avenue, the arguments of thn moment had to tin with stork exchange control anil legal pro- cedure In utility rati- cases. Here anil there legislators clustered In private, however, to assess the latest turn on controversies yet to conic. They were not long In learning that the preBldent, aftor Ills press conference, signed the Migar con- trol bill and planned to do the Maine, with the tax tomorrow. There, was divided opinion on hlii reduction of tho sugar tariff hy half a cent a pound. There was nothing substantially new In the presidential stands on debt H and Hllver. On the first, lit reemphaslzed to reporters around his desk that this country willing- ly would grant a hearing to Its debtors, that none has heen asked and so payiuentH are looked for on the June due (late. Whether "token" payments such as made In the pant hy Great Ilrlt- aln and some will he ac- cepted In June will he decided up- on the merits of each case. Writing Silver Hill The silver case remained one of waiting for putting Into hill form the tentatively agreed declaration of policy for nationalization of the metal, and to set an objective of having a quarter of the curren- cy based on the metal. The presi- dent wants discretion left to him In' e'ffoctlng a broadening of bl- metallsni. Incidentally, he legislat- ion at thlH session to control oil production. To the NUA. trade commission and Justice department he sent the voluminous Darrow report con- cerning monopoly anil the NUA. The three agencies presumably are. to report back to him about it he- font publication. Among other happenings of the that attracted above the ordl- notice. Secretary Hull en- dorsed proposals for it congress- ional study of the advisability of trading war debt concessions for new supplies of tin. President Green of the Ameri- can Federation of Labor advocated the Lal'ollette public works bill. He said unem- ployment estimates for April showed still out of work. The president told western senators that Intensls of wool growers would be carefully pro- tected In the use of proposed power for him to make tariff-trade deals abroad. East Central Faculty Grows But Student Increase More Rapid nnd More Instruc- tors Needed Growth of Kast Central State Teachers college through the 25 years of existence of the Institu- tion Is reflected not only In size of student body hut also In the number of Instructors required. East Central started out with Id teachers years ago. Today the faculty numbers (if. teachers. The members of today's faculty have on an average at least twice as many years of college and uni- versity training to their credit an did those of the first faculty. It Is noteworthy that the pres- ent faculty Is four times as large as the first faculty but that the number of students In regular attendance Is eight times as large, sn that the average mem- ber now Instructs four times an students during the day member of the first facul- many did a ty. Tills condition points to next forward step for the Day by Day Happenings in Pontotoc County Oil Fields (From Rolling of the Harry Black- i.tock No. 1 Lewis well In 19-2-7. Kills field, Wednesday night fail- ed to lower oil In tlio holt; he- low the foot mark, so the well was shut In to await arrival of the swab. Swabbing Is expect- ed to start late today or tomor- row. There was not enough gas to lift the column of oil and force It to flow from the foot depth to which tliQ well was dril- led, hut It was thought that af- ter the well was shut In for a time It might accumulate enough to start oil flowing. While no accurate estimate of the. well's probable production or oil is yet available, the showing of the Illackstock test Is regard- ed as encouraging and as point- ing to a profitable producer. A. C. Huckleberry No. 2 Hll- ler. In northwest of 27-3-fi, sev- eral miles north of Ada, has been In 27-2-8, western part of county, today wcs at 4.190 Coal feet. (From Frlilaj'a Dally) Knocking out a bridge which halted flow of oil from the Los iVngeles Petroleum Corp. No. 1 I'latt, In ;tfi-5-4, southwest exten- sion of the Rebec field, resulted In renewed flow estimated at about 350 barrels per day. The well has attracted much at- tention since It was drilled In last Sunday and flowed 700 barrels of oil In 42 hours. Caving from IfiO feet of open hole Is blamed for the bridge which blocked the flow. When the bridge was knocked out of the way, enough gas pressure had ac- cumulated to hurl the bailer against the crown block and spray oil over the derrick. The well flowed two Hours be- fore It quieted. The operators are planning to put In a liner to cut off caving of shale. Into the hole nnd Interfering with the flow of lege being an Increase the col- ln the number of Instructors so that the students may have the definite personal attention which Is Im- plied hi higher education. LUKE LEft LEAVE Former Senator nnd World War Velernn nnd Son Lose Last Fight For Freedom NASHVILLE. Tenn.. May 9 (.T) In two automobiles with n machine gun and an automatic rifle guard, Luke Lea und Luke Lea Jr., were started for North Carolina today to receive penal- ties Imposed for bank law viola- tions. The Tennessee supreme court turned the former United States senator and his son over to Slier- H Iff Laurence E. Brown nnd Dep- uty Sheriff Frank Lakey of Anlie- vllle. N. C.. whom fiovernor Hill McAllster had named as agents when he ordered the Leas' extra- dition more than a year ago, Lea sr.. Is under a six to ten year prison sentence. His son has the alternative of paying a 000 fine and costs or serving two to four years. Lea and his son also are under ndlctment here lu connection vltli affairs in Knoxvllle In coll- ection with the failed Holston 'nion National bank. L. E. (iwlnn, chief counsel for he Leas, left Nashville just he- ore noon for North Carolina and t was reported a habeas corpus OKLAHOMA CITY. May 1U34 wheat crop was estimated at bushels today by the crop re- porting service of tin; state hoard of agriculture. Abandonment ot about 58S.OOO acres, or approxi- mately 14 per cent of the acre- ago planted last autumn, leaving for harvest acres, was reported. Tho heavy abandonment was duo principally to drouth In the western third of the state, wind storms In the northwest and some Insect damage In the north cen- tral and central areas. Harry P.. Cordell, board president, said. At that, the crop will exceed by more than bushels tho harvest In 1933. he predicted. WASHINGTON, May Federal expenditures today pass-1 oil for the flsca" year which ends June "0, to rep resent the first outlay of this size since 1920. i The 'exact expenditure upi to May 7. tho latest day available 'was Of this was for emergency purposes and for routine governmen costs. The deficit on this day was 410.509.129. as compared will a year ago. S Test tube babies, says Sir Ar Mithnot Lane, famous Loniloi rgeon, will produce a mon 'orous race. But with no fath to gloat over thorn! ictlon state. might be brought in Hint AS ROBBER OF DALLAS, May Tht slate of Texas, determined to ob- aiu a death penalty, drew fron hree witnesses today definite dentlflcatloii of Itayiuond Jhinill ton. 20. as one of the men win robbed the C.rand Prairie State iank of March They were J. T. Yeager, cash er; J. V. Waggoner, vice presl lent, and Maudii Crawford, bool; Iseeper. Hamilton arose and said. "1 jilead not when Dear Oatildln. assistant district attorn y. arraigned the southwest ban! robber on an habitual criminal In llctinent. Iloth sides rested tentatively n' noon. TWOlGlifflS" SEMINOLE, May Irst case reported by way o recognition of demands ot union oil field strikers came to Ugh today with the announcemen that two rig contractors had sign ed a tentative closed shop agrc mcnt -with the rlg-bulldlng divls Ion of tin--union. W. E. Hicks, representing th rig builders division, said a ten tatalve agreement calling for a day Increase in wages fo rig builders had been slgne with E. L. Bonyer, Shawneo con tractor, and E. H. Hollls, Ad contractor. The agreement states that th wage Increase to a day fo eight hours work, will be In fore until "a complete settlement" reached In a conference to b hold at Tulsa on May 14. The action returned 30 me to work In tho greater Semlnol area. Hicks said. Thu rls-biilli: ers had Friday. been on strike since las plugged back to the Hunton lime after drilling to feet wore under way Is reported flowing several him-1 today to swab the H. L. dred barrels of oil, with No. 1 Lewis In 19-2-7 which ga.i to force the oil to the been drilled deep Into the lime to feet, deep- The Los Angeles Pet. Corp. No. 1 Flatt, In 38-5-4, producer In the Kltts field. Wednesday night balling could ield, wljcli 1ms beun flowing oil since It was brought In Sunday, Is re-ported to have slowed down, HO that the operators may drill further into the formation from! which the oil flowed 700 barrels n 42 hours earlier. Moore-Wlrlck No. 2 in 20-2-7. which early Wednesday drilled through after cementing surfac" pipe at 538 feet, today was lower the oil In the hole be-ow feet nnd a. swab was ordered. U was thought that iwabblng might get under way ate this afternoon. Another fishing Job In the Fills irea resulted from twisting oft of drill stem at 500 feet In the Moore-WIrlck No. 2. In 28-2-7. Magnolia No. 1 Norris. in 18-2-7, today was drilling at 'oet. Ing feet. It Is an Merrlck No. 1 Norris in o the north of the No. 1 was at feet today. Vlrlcl: which Is producing No. 1 Edwards, from the Hunton lime below 27-2-8 was at feet. GOO No. 1 Mayer, In 7-3-8, Ward Morrlclc No. 1 Norris, down at feet because also Is making weather conditions. progress, drilling today lit E. Crobsic, Inc., No. 1 Dawes In 30-2-7, this morning Magnolia No. 1 Norris, in opened and produced 15 bar- 2-S, today was at of oil In three hours. Opera- Deaner-Moore No. 1 (Continued on Page 8, No. M! GITI'8 ABOUT Mexican Reported to Not Yet Made on Given Details of Plot of City At- Collect For Ada TUCSON. Ariz., May (.T) O. E. Welborn has been Tho Associated Press was told by the new board of city an authoritative source today as health officer one of tho men who figured In the city of Ada. cldnaplng plot ot June Robles, commissioners made the year-old heiress, has been on this appointment >y Investigators and Is now afternoon. in their custody. It also was told that a written document giving details of the and locations where tho have not yet reached a decision on the selection from among applicants for a city at- las been secreted was found, penned by the man. Not formally under arrest, nor the subject ot any charges, the man has, been In the custody Most of the business of tho Tuesday afternoon meeting of tht commissioners dealt with disposition of claims .entire routine nvestlgutors for a week. V document, it was said. Implicates ilnt as one of four persons In the {Idnaplng of the girl last LIFE 25 from her home linn He was Identified as a RF dlHllUd The others in the plot described as a Mexican and Miss.. May 4. wife, and a man whoso 22nd quadrennial general ity was not of the Methodist Epis- The document. It was Church, South, today defeat- alneil. outlined a plan In proposals to limit the terms ol the white man and the decided not to elect anj couple were to have 'taken bishops at this conference to Santa Cruz, Sonera, about amended the discipline to per- miles southeast ot Nogales, the retirement of bishops foi after she was seized, and and Inefficiency.' there while tho other major decisions were now In custody, negotiated with Bishop Jamof; Cannoti the ransom, originally set at In the chair as the presldlns of the conference In hlf Knrly of seniority In the college o The money, the document closed, was to have been Cannon yesterday was within the first 12 hours after In office as one of the 11 kidnaping. At the end of bishops after an unsuccess period, the child was to have fight made on him from t spirited to Cauanea, ot the conferences seek south of the border, below to retire him on the claim o beo. Tli ore nlic wns to left with a relative of the man who wrote the document nnd a request made to the relative Checks Expected to Be take tho child back to the Hobles family. Investigators, It Is Off Soor have questioned the relative and have absolved him of any part In the kidnaping. The Associated Press CITY. May 9 Governor Murray's final claln to wind up his administration o that the man delegated to collect the ransom was frightened off relief was on file toda} with W. H. Bruminett, Jr.. specla the widespread hunt for the child. Thus the first part of the plot at FERA headquarter here, with a request for abou collection ot tlie money Several days later, when tho police announced a "hands off" policy to permit the Itoblcs family to make a contact with the kidnapers, the contact man, s'us-pcctlng an attempted undercover Inquiry, still refused to approach the family. This, U became known, was tho reason the family hfiri nnnhlo to ninke nnv requrft was complete! Tuesday by Sam Bounds, audito In Murray's oiflce, but Brummet said it will be three or four day before ho can complete a check o the claims and prepare n sched ule for the Washington office. Brummett predicted the fund will be allotted within a -week aft or that. Checks then will be mad Court Declares Commission Proration Orders Under Former Law Invalid WIPES OOnSLnTE CLEAN Law Under Which State Now Operates Not Involved in Litigation OKLAHOMA CITY, May Oklahoma supreme court In effect wiped out bar- rels of "hot" oil from the Okla- homa City field today. The court declared nil prorat- lon orders made by thn corporat- ion commission prior to April 10, are void. It granted a writ preventing the commission from proceeding to punish alleged vio- lators of the old orders. The far-reaching decision was handed down In the suit of the H. P. Wllcox Oil and Gas Co. against the commission. The com- pany Instituted the suit when served with an order to file dully reports of production under the old proratlon regulations. The new proratlon law under which the commission Is now operating was effective April 10, 1933. and the opinion does not apply to subse- quent orders. Gross production taxes paid to the Oklahoma tax commission, In many Instances anonymously, dis- closed that about 10.000.000 bar- rels of oil were run from the Okla- homa City field In excess of al lowables under the old proratlon set-up. The opinion has no bearing on the authority of the tax cotnmts slon to proceed with Its Inquiries on payment of gross production taxes on local oil production. lilisby Dissents Justice Monroe Osborn announc- ed the majority opinion In which seven other members of the court j concurred. Justice Orel Busby dis- sented. Osborn announced from the bench that the old proratlon or- ders were declared void, "because of jurisdiction on defects." His Ifi-page written opinion dwelt at length on alleged errors of the commission In falling to give prop- er notice of Its proration hearings and In falling to establish the market demand for oil under prop- er rules. Chairman Paul Walker of the corporation commission declared: "Now we've to begin our work all over again." He appeared elat- ed, however, over a portion of the opinion stating the writ granted Is not Intended as a check on the .commission's inquisitorial powers, I The opinion pointed out that [the law gives the commission "full authority to require production of I books, records, etc. in any proper i proceeding." Can Denuitiil ItepoHs t "I don't know what the major- ity of the commission will want to do, but I am glad the court recog- nizes our constitutional powers to proceed with the Investigation of oil runs. I don't know what good It will do, for the writ prevents us from taking any action to punish violators of the old prorat- lon orders, but It gives us a lever to demand reports from all com- panies operating In the city Walker added. The chairman Intimated that he will ask other commissioners to join In demanding reports as a means of checking on the comp- anies which exceeded their allow- ables. READY FOR "FIGHT OF HIS LIFE' Federal Circuit Judge Issues Habeas Corpus; Will Be Heard Tomorrow BEWlsfdW Aged Prisoner Deeply ned But Takes ment Calmly CHICAGO. May Will M. Sparks of the U. S. cir- cuit court of appeals granted' a habeas corpus writ for Samuel Insull this afternoon and agreed to hear a petition at a. m. tomorrow for the reduction of his bond. The petition, signed by Insull himself In the county Jail hospital, was presented by his attorney, Floyd E. Thompson, after another federal Judge had refused an In- formal motion to trim tho heaviest bond ever required In a Chicago federal court. Thompson said he argue that which Insull can furnish. Is ample bond to assure his appearance for trial and that the higher sum was' exorbitant nnd violated his constitutional rights. Will lie Arraigned Friday CHICAGO. May Insull will be arraigned In federal 'court Friday, It was announced to- day, to be charged In the two fed- eral cases against him. The deposed utilities magnate, now In Cook county Jail, will ho brought before Judge Phillip L. Sullivan 'and hear himself charged with using the malls to defraud. In connection with tho sate of stock In Corporation Secur- Inc., and with fraudulent acts violating the bankruptcy laws. Determined to "make the fight of his lite for vindication." Samuel been II Boston police were all sot for a May Day riot, with a large supply of guns and ammunition, hut they took an awful chance of Dllllnger ruunlui; loouu. tact with the abductors. Former Senator Heflln of Ala out In his office to be signed by the governor, taking up the last of Murray's overdrawn relict bama has failed In his attempt checks nnd food claims which ac- to return to Congress. Gone at cumulated after me federal re- a time! now. Wo huvo Huey Longlltef work had Ilils control. boon taken from The opinion was regarded as blocking any attempt by the com- mission to start proceedings against W. B. Sklrvln. Oklahoma City hotel operator, who recently admitted .over-producing his Washington park well. Sklrvln was revealed as the source of about In delinquent royal- ties collected for the city by How- ard E. Cole, special Investigator. The well was over-produced about barrels, according tc Sklrvln, but he declared It had been kept within allowables slnci. April 1. 1033. 1933. The court defined Indlvldua rights to oil and the. commis- sion's authority to regulate pro ductlon with this assertion: "Every person has the right U drill wells on his own land am to take from the source below all tho oil that he maybe able to reduce to possession. Including that coming from land belon; Ing to others subject to tho rca sonable exercise ot the police power of the state to proven unnecessary loss, destruction o waste. "In the absence ot a restrict Ion by the proper exercise of the police power of the state, the petitioner herein had such right Whether the police power ha been vatldly exercised by the trl bunnl entrusted with authority In that regard Is therefore the par amount and determinative quest Ion In this case." The court then criticized tin commission's method of detenu Inlng "waste" and In fixing th market demand. It reiterated a former ruling that tho four sand (Continued on Pago 4, No, nsull is shown here as he .posed for, photographers upon reaching I and -will have their S'ew York harbor, on his way back to Chicago to face trial. Strain i next day ln court May 15 The f the ordeal through which he has passed was plainly apparent on nlne business associates who are he face of the fallen utilities czar, along with Insult; In tho j bankruptcy- case havo never been arraigned, however. They will come Into court with Insull Friday. Cuba Will Enter Competition For Divorce Traffic Ada Lee Turnbow, 6, Wound- ed in Side ns .22 Rifle Discharged (From Ilnlly) Ada Lee Turnbow, six jt-ar old "A year ago we were Juniors. Today we are a year older and j HAVANA. May a year nearer that goal which ,9 to nmond ncr dl. has been set for said E. H. m Nelson, of the East Central col- lego faculty. In his baccalaureate sermon to tho senior graduating a portion of the "divorce trade." Tho cabinet approved divorce ____.......-------- se __. innthv laughter of Mrs. Mary Turnbow, claM ot stonewall high fnt, 831 W. Sixth, was wounded this May fi. sess on last night, but leaders i tn. .tloMnun nntllpd. I declined to. disclose their Reminiscent of the sermon on: porgong to lm, 8ltuaUon. however, said strong pressure ut ..tic OMI faith which Mr Nelson delivered1..... a year ago was his scripture of )lnd been ,0 bcar upotl nornlng by tho accidental ills- charge of a .22 "target" rifle in he hands of her brother Everett, years of age. Ada Leo was riisheil by ambu- ance to the Sugg Clinic, where t was found that the bull-it _.....___.....____ _. ______ struck her In the right has not given us a for merging on the right side of character, it has failed." six or seven montli's Kutu The fundamental part of edu the government to liberalize tho laws. cation should bo the building of. The consensus of well-informed character." he said. "It education ,g t, t nmondmcnt8 back. It was hoped that the ballot ill asod both lung and Intestine as It traveled Its brief course .hrough the child's body. Ada Leo was standing by a able In the home near Everett, ivho was loading the rltlo when n some manner llscharged. -tc- liflo was TWO SHES Ruth Is an example of the highest typo of character that i residence in Cuba. for nurlty and! Il also ls that tho the to! Bounds for divorce turn on her heathen gods and go will, he Increased. ______ with Naomi Into a straiige land. nnv QAV17Q TO AIM The young men and women ot BUY 1KA1N for at no time lu history have nioro heathen gods called to tho youth than are calling today. "K we are not going to build char- acter, we have no excuse for be- ing. Every generation Is obligat- ed to the coming generation to pay for Its existence." What has happened to every MUSKOGEE, May 4. country or city that has torgot- culturfc, because Its people ndd not take )lea to charges In connection with he "shooting up" ot the hamlut of Webbers Falls, near here, last; October. Uradshaw pleaded guilty to n specific charge at assault with In- tent to kill Charles. Green, a negro, on a Webbers Falls street while the two Bradshaws were Athens, Home and other exam- ples failed, "Just as Uuth dared to break away from heathen gods wnlch were holding and hindering her Approaching llroken Rail teen-year-old Stanley Cook a hero. Walking to school two ration west ot hero, he noticed a brok- en rail connection on the Mis- souri Pacific tracks. Stanley knew n passenger train was due In a few minutes. "You go on to school and tell teacher I'll be late." he told a companion. "I'll stop the train." Stanley ran n half mile down he trucks und flagged the train ivlth his cap nnd lunch pall. HEADRIGHT HOLDS 'celebrating" with wild pistol fire. I (n own laud, and gave God a chanco to UBO her, we may give After he had beun sentenced Rradshaw was taken Into federal court and given a two-year sen- tence on a previous plea ot guilty to liquor possession, The court specified that the term run con- currently with the state sentence xcept that It will take effect In Lhe' event Is released Trom state's prison, McAlo-sler, In less than two years. WHO SAW IIATTr.K GKTTY.SHWia DEAD s'elson concluded. NEWKIRK, May M. Zelgler of Newklrk. who saw the battle ;of Gettysburg as a boy of ten and later heard Lin- coln's Gettysburg address, died last night at Tulsa. His father was a Union soldier. Zlegler Was Kay county's first treasurer following statehood. Funeral services will be held In the Methodist church a.m. tomorrow. hero at Greater returns for tho amount Inrcsted News Classified Ads. Burrow School, Teacherage Go Up In Flames (IVum Tliiirsdiiy'ii Uallr) A report to tho office of Sheriff Clyde Kaiser this morning told ot tho destruction-by flre or the school building and teacherago at Burro AT about 3 o'clock this mornlug. The sheriff's office Immediately began nn Investigation Into tho circumstances ot the lire. Burrow Is In tho extreme southeastern corner ot tho county. The U. S. treasury department Is mobilizing 1800 mon to combat the Illegal liquor traffic, who said prohibition has been re- pealed? Greater returns for tho amount Invested News ClaasIIled Ada.' OKLAHOMA CITY. May An Osage Indian holds his icadrlght for life and It may not be Bold, alienated or Incumbered iiuler a state supremo court de- cision on file today. The court sustained an Osago county district court ruling against H. H. Brenner. Holding a (1.000 judgment against W. D. Musgrovc, holder ot an Osage icadrlght, Drcnner applied to tho court for appointment ot a re- ceiver to tako over tho hoadrlght till his Judgment Is paid. Stnr Ten To He (ilven Next Sunday afternoon. Mother's Day, tho American Legion Auxil- iary Is sponsoring a Gold Star Mother's Tea. to bo given In tho home of Dr. Sam A. McKcel, 101 West Fourteenth. All Gold Star Mothers In Pon- totoc county are Invited to be honor guests. The public Is also Invited. Any one who knows of a Gold Star Mother In Pontotoc county, should call Mrs. Roy Chrlsman. at 1363, Ada. The Auxiliary will furnish transportation for Gold Star Mothers next Sunday.   

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