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   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - May 3, 1934, Ada, Oklahoma                             THE ADA WEEKLY NEWS VOLUME XXXIV ADA, OKLAHOMA, THURSDAY, MAY 3, 1934 NUMBERS France Center of Greatest Dis- turbances; Troops and Police on Duty Demonstrations Less Violent in Other Parts of Europe And America SAN FRANCISCO. May 1. t.Vi Will Rogers drew applause that neared the proportions of an ova- tion the curtain dropped -in hlB first appearance In a straight legitimate stage role here last night. The actor anyl humorist, w'n> has played many motion picture parts, wan cast as Nat Miller. cimilnt. (jnlet, kindly father of a good .sized family in Eug.'Tio O'Nolll's "Ah. Wilderness." lingers did not deviate from tho linos of the role and 'suc- cessfully merged his well-known Individuality Into the part.   persons were estimated Injured. Moro than 1..100 people were assigned In special duty against violence In connection with ral- llesand parades of communlst.il following the graduating and socialists In New York. Precautions were, taken _ Civic Clubs to Join in Celebra- ting 25th Anniversary Of College Plans for the Silver Jubilee week of Kant Central were discus- sed at the Chamber of Commerce mooting today. As outlined by Dr. Must-held and his committee at the college. the tentative plans call for a celebration by all of the civic clubs of Ada. various func- tions at the College, and a grand finale by the Chamber of Com- I exorcises. 10' The notary club will start the Kills Dog, Restores Him to Life This Country Stands Squarely Upon Treaties and Recog- nized Rights JflPFsTEHT Press Expresses Resentment of Statement of American Attitude (Dr The Preii) Japan followed tho lead of Great Hrltaln today In Indicating It considered the controversy over Japan's "hands oft Asia" policy !closed. A Japanese foreign office com- munhiuo pointedly Ignored statement by Cordell Hull, United States secretary of state, reading: "In tho opinion of the American ipeople and the American govern- ment, no nation can, without tho assent of the other nations con- cerned rightfully endeavor to make conclusive its will In a situ- ation where there are involved the rights, tho obligations anrt tltu legitimate Interests of other sovereign states." In London It was paid that the Loagui) of nations Is determined to carry on Its project of cooper- ation with the reconstruction of China. Press llesentful The Japanese press, however, voiced resentment ot America's toward tho Japanese ______ oft China" policy, the ready for any eventuality. the Methodist Church. South, will being In sharp contrast Citizens or Spain laid In preach tho baccalaureate sermon mnnnoV iu which word of piles for the day because of a'at tho First Baptist church. Mon- oreat Britain's willingness to general strike mid a government-! day at noon the Klwanls club will guard against bombings In Chl-l week's celebration with a special cago where another heavy monl- Friday. May 11. The flrm Btnmi Illation of police strength was following Illshop Moore of Of general decreed brought state of alarm which! a special celebration pro- a general shutdown. Igram. and the Lions will follow drop the whole mater raised by tho Japanese foreign office de- claration of Ap.ll 17 was recelv- broucht a general shutdown. gram, ami me i-ions win clnratlon of Ap.ll 1' Thousands of Cuban soldiers'on Tuesday with n program tea- cd KMT? Havana after requests for pro-: of Foreign J communique recent ileclar- Mlnlstor Kokl llavum after renuosts for 'ations or I'oreign .Minister SSfo? ma'dV by Joseph C States and German official. or Lindlcy A "state of similar to n nf chamber wan iTmed martial law, was decreed throng.) in of iato clve the out Argentina. Workmen nii.sorv- WOII1OI1 lived In Ada _to.f Pronounced dead for four minutes on April 13. Lazarus IV, mon- grel terrier, breathes and eats again, slowly to nor- mal life through the genius of Dr. Robert E. Cornish, young Cal- ifornia physician. Put to death with nitrogen, tho terrier was brought back to life with Injections of blood, adrenalin, and hep- arln. Cornish, shown here feeding his Is optimistic that he has found the means of restoring life. ed tho with Parades and us- aRO and had a parl Monibllfs. I lociitlnji tho iiiHtilutloti will UP t i i Disorders were feared between beld. The Horace Mann sradua- s opposing communist and socialist, ting exorcises will bo on Wednes- factions In Panama. To avoid; day. .uumis da them times. a declara- actlons Panama. 10 .num tlon of Japan's unique position In authorities arranged for, meeting of tho chamber F t j 'hem to parade nl different; next Thursday will feature.better, "The statcmont> delivered .Imes. rfHMiHied provide the program1" substance to Foreign Minister at Santiago, Chile, af-' The organization Jo n .insnnh n. Grew In Tokyo. division In puttin cancelled at Santiago, unm-. m- ter three days ot fighting bo- Junior dlv twocn workers and police which, lias resulted in four j.V An extra guard watched c K wlu the presidential palace In tllo matter of a city ball club D. F. I for this summer, and make rec- In Moscow. War Commissar.ommemmtioiis at a future meeting. Voroshlloff Issued a May Day, proclamation balling the red nri j Tj-J rnijnRjr army as the [ftLL I tLtrilllNt and unfaltering guard of prole- 1 tarlan revolution." i Ilrrlln made merry as Germany dor Joseph C. Grew In Tokyo, In effect: i First, that Japan Is still a Dr. nutlodgo. Dr. O. to treaties for the malntc- 'nance of Chinese sovereignty; Second, that treaties cannot bo legally "modified or terminated" except bp tho processes agreed upon by the contracting parlies, and; Third, that tho United States has certain rights in China and proposes to keep them. Although both the Japanese ambassador and tho Chinese min- ister In Washington had no Im- mediate statement concerning the Police Take Precautions Against Disorder and None Appears NEW May (.Ti- nder the survlllance of 1.500 ollccnicn. Now York's May Day lobrants marched today to emonstrate the unity of the orklng elapses. Officials took the usual pre- autlons, carefully guarding all tibllc buildings, and tho offices ml homes of well-known capital-. sts to prevent possible violence. They also routed, communist ml socialist pnraders along paths vhlch did not approach each ithor, fearful lest tho clashing redos of the two group? might ireclpltato disorders. Tho communist parade began on in Union Square. The socialists narched today Madison Square, ho city's other soap-box sector. The communist jmrado began on he downtown water-front, to the music of bands and drum and OKLAHOMA CITY, May 1 of devoted the second May nay...................... bratlon under the uazl. regline western IJell Telephone policy, there came peeches and, Increased over Borah (R., Idaho) .raise of the Improved lot of valuation by tho statejn statement: H pral working man. I American stand toward the mod- Rifled Nipponese .policy, there came STOLEN SftFE UPB1 equalization board today In !ts j largest boost of any public util- ity's assessment. The company's properties wore assessed at S18.300.8S5 as com- pared with last year. The company listed Its properly MANNI'OIJD. Okla.. May __Deputy Sheriff Wesley Gage In voluntary at return. The board also votod n Increase In the tax valuation "I like It very much and find myself In tull agreement with It." The league's London headquar- ters made Its stand known today In view of tho declaration of Ilrltlsh Foreign Secretary Sir John Simon that so far as the Ilrltlsh government Is concerned the Incident provoked by Japan's restatement of 'her China policy Is closed. year from a bank at Oxford. Kan., the same farm near hero whore several long hunted criminals were captured March 15. of Tho safe was conceab'd under few Inches of soil and some dirty straw in tho farm barn. Gage took It into Saptllpa to be opened and examined. He said be believed several other safes stolen from stores and banks in Okla- homa, Arkansas and Kansas bad been concealed at various places about the farm. Glenn Hoy Wright and Pat Col- lins, two of those taken In the raid, now are serving life sent- ences for robbery with firearms, while others. Including Charles Cotner. alleged former associate of Ford nradshaw. robber recent- ly killed, were taken to Kansas points for Investigation. testing rate reductions for moro I up this attitude, jointing out thai tlrin two years. It was assessed Sir Is a member of at An Investigation tho League of Nations i- blMt Ihe enii-.oyment of foreign charges legislature ress under direction of the cor- poration commission since July >f that year. GILES REDUCES FORCE Iteillirtlon .Made Necessary by Small Allotment Kor May OKLAHOMA CITV. May a 50 per cent re- duction In his headquarters ad- ministrative staff. Carl Giles, state FEUA head, said the reduc- tion was made necessary by re- duced appropriations for May. Again he emphasized thai no new workers are being added to payrolls, adding that ex- isting rolls are steadily being reduced. Claims aggregating in unpaid obligations of Governor Murray's federal relief adminis- tration have been presented lor payment. Auditor Sam Drown ie- ported. Report Roff Man Involved in Bank Robbery in Texas SHERMAN. TOX., Sheriff J. Ilenton Davis, whose leputles captured Raymond Ham- lion and T. R. Ilrooks here yes- terday, planned to leave for Clo- vls. N. M., tonight to assume cus- todv of n man held for a bank robbery in this county. Dnvls reported that Chester Dellsto of Roff, Okla., who faces charge advisers by China. It Is accepted In London thai Japan has officially withdrawn from Ihe "hands-off China" po slllon voiced by a foreign ofllce spokesman April 17 and that Tokyo's position Is correctly slat ed In a later note of Intorpreta lion delivered to Oreat Ilrltali and the United States for Foreign Minister Kokl Hirota. -X- ARMORY RAIDED WARSAW, Iml., May Thirteen .-15 calibre pistols were missing from the national guan armory here today, but whothe they have been added to the arm amcnt of the fugitive John Dll o nt noii. uKia.. wm, obtalncd mil ;.H ot robbery with f rearms In connection with the robbery of the Wbltesboro Na- tional Hank March U, had been caught there with a quantity of currency. Frazlor, Sulphur, Okli.. and Calvin H. Smltt. Roff, Okla., are held lu Jail now In connec- tion with the robbery. Yt'KON. Okla.. May A Rock Island motor Valn ed Into a truck carrying three wood-choppers Irere today, kil- ling two and Injuring tho third. The dead are Frank Mauk. 42. and John Vlan. 5S. Jeff Vlan. Is In the hospital, where the elder Vlan died. lolproof vests at the focal poltc station 13, was n question on which police declined to spec ulate. Whoever stolo the weapon walked In an unlocked door, wen Ihrough open cltlbrooms In th front part of tho armory, nn  and J10 bills Identified as part of the ransom asserted he Intends to go jmoney. The "hot" currency was court In that event to establish founu- William E. Vidlcr, a his right to the name ux- lKanibler, last Thursday. cluslvely. I" jjeivln H. Purvis, clijef of the Itep. Will Kogcrs, w'.-.o won I Chicago office of the bureau ot In- Ihe congress-at-largi) 1932 by an astonishin also has an opponent of rncu tn'vestlgation. announced that majority, Laughlln had made a full confcs- of his part in the disposition Identical name In tho same ram-lot portions of the ran- palgn this year and Is expected !KOm paid for Dremer's freedom to contest tho second filing. Oth-'after 23 days a captive of kid- Enjoy Program at Busby! er Cnmudate3 have opponents of.napers. Lodge. Informal Talk By Judge Orel Busby (I'rmn Members of the I'ontotoc Coun- ty .Schoolmasters club and their guests enjoyed a pleasant meet- Monday afternoon and eve- ning at Ilusby lodge In the final meeting of the school year. During the afternoon the teachers assembled as they drove In from classrooms all over the county and from neighboring counties. They pitched horse- shoes, gathered at curd tables or Flood and sat around In groups talking informally until evening. At the proper time Hugh Nor- Hs sounded tho call to eats and the teachers marched past the open air buffet to get their suc- culent steaks and other tasty Items of food. Later In the evening J. Arthur Horron of Francis presided ut an similar names. jlliljicia. Four men were In federal cus- tn.i.. mi  oro a species of art designed lymhollzo communistic principles.) j'Io why tho tu- Sovoral thousand unemployed milled about the square. preme court of this state Is un able to hold hearings and nand There was no disorder as decisions immediately, sta tins that the court averages cnmmunlsls marched toward the square. As they wound through ho financial section of downtown Manhattan, they received an offor- ng of ticker tape from their capitalists. HEW ISTMETBIS WASHINGTON. Apr. Col. Luke Lea. former senator [rom Tennessee, and his son, Luke Lea jr., today were denied a re- view by the supreme court ot the action of Tennessee courts order- ing their extradition to North Carolina to serve sentences Im- posed on them In that state. Lea. formerly publisher ot the Nashville Tcnnesscan and for many years a dominant power In Tennessee politics, was convicted August, son on charges.growing out of tho failure of the Central Hank Trust Co. of Ashevllle, N. C., a concern. Lea was sentenced to Imprison- ment for nix to 10 years, and his son was fined or sentenc- ed to from two to six years Im- prisonment. in North Carolina In 19111. along with his Circulation of petitions urging conspiring In the disposition ot tho state election board to strlkojum ransom, was alleged to havo tho other names from tho ballotjbandled of the money was anticipated. [that passed through McLiuighlln'a A farmer Jack Walton, of near .hands. Turley, tiled In tho democratic! The government Is hunting two governor's race against tho. form-'.Oklahoma ex-convicts, Arthur or governor, ousted ten years agOjllarker and Alvln Karpls. as the and now a state corporation corn-victual abductors of the St. Paul mlssloner. The strange situ-1 banker, atlon was further complicated j A report that the pair had been from 107 out of 220 ballot boxes In the district. The slender margin ho galmul from the first reports was main- tained by tho veteran Congress- man W. n. Oliver In the sixth district with 3.534 votes from 71 out of 204 boxes in the district, to for Peto D. Jarman, Jr., secretary of state, and 113 for Thomas H. Maxwell, ot' Tusca- loosa. A. H. Carmlchael, reprosontlns j tho eighth district, on returns out ot 209 ballot when a second Will Ilogers of Ardmore, left his filing blank In the democrallc congress-at-large race at the election board offices and dashed out again. The filing period closed Satur- day, with a record total of candidates under the wire for the, July primaries, but there Is a five-day protest period. Confusion Is Protest seen In secret custody of Purvis! over Hie week-end was denied by federal officers. L. SCOTT DIES IN WASHINGTON 2.C04 13 o i 'ir 1 The veteran Georgo Huddlest ton, who during his many yearn as representative from the ninth district (Jefferson county) has weathered many storms, appeared tto havo ridden out another, and to have escaped a runoff. I He had a clear majority in ro- I ports from 139 out of 235 boxes. 1.200 appeals annually, many moro appeals being filed In this state than In older states. Ho reminded the teachers that the opinions handed Jown on constitutional questions do always represent tho personal sentiment of the Justice wlu Is writing the decision, but that he Is preparing an opinion on a law In consideration of Its con-itltu- tlonality as the law was written by the 'state legislature. At a time when the United States Is turning from many of the old moorings and launching Into untried waters, the higher courts are faced with questions of gravest Importance as their decisions will have much lo do with safeguarding, strengthening or making effective new adminis- trative policies. The speaker closed with an urgent appeal for the teachers to take an active Interest In politics, to keep In mind their high calling In sotting attitudes of basic honesty and Integrity In the boys and girls of tho schools of today as a safeguard to the be .i AoX'i lolt f iff. it Ullt A tf Will, UL tflttJ Unprecedented confusion as al, lighter) Judgo James E, Horton ot u caused both for voters anrt nm, ng a trtoKA ot man. I Athens who presided In tho sec- ond trial of Heywod Patcrson. election officials by tho Identical Mlljor Hugli L. Scott Is dead. names unless changes are made. Tho IormcP ot staff of.ono of nine negro defendants In Petitions bearing 100 slgna-ithe army hall "Scottsboro case." and sot lures must be filed within 111 imuiiino fctnj challenged names from the ha -itlos Of his 80 years. He died lato diclal district on roturnn from .IS lot. Then, lo remain on Hie prlncelon, Now Jer-lotil ot 120 boxes. hospital hero for two. the death verdict aside, led Ills jlccaugo Df tho Inflrml-'two opponents In tho eighth Ju- lot, the challenged candidates would have to submit petitions of names within ten days. aej. was Kour of Horton had 676 votes; Oceola picturesque 'Kyle ot Decatur. with 485; ami military service began when Scott A. A. Griffith of iCutlman. with Two -other candidates, former from West; 408. Tho vote did not Include a Gov. Henry S. Johnston, ousted into tho 187fi.slnglo box from Morgan counly. In 1329 and now running for glmlx aml tlle of the trial, and Kyle's congress-at-largo and G. n. Mil- drlvcg against the Nez Perco home. OKLAHOMA CITY, May of Herb Kelly, ou fielder and Charley Moncrlef, pitcher, from the Tulsa Oilers was announced today by-Secre- tary E. J. Humphries of the Ok- lahoma City club of the Texas league. In a straight cash The price was not announced. OIL HELD WORKERS TO MEETjtOIL CENTER I'ontotoc county oil field work- ers will hold their regular week- ly mooting at Oil Center Friday nlghl. according lo j. C. Mitchell, of the Allen local. The organization will he com- pleted and temporary officers elected. Mitchell says. He also urges that nil men who work in tho oil fields bu present at this meeting. nation's future. ton, former assistant attorney and Cheyenne Indians. general and a candidate for sit-. Ag ag 1931i premo court Justice, said they (b thc ubrary ot Congress, he would fight It out at the friend- from 13 tribes with candidates of similar names. jlo a ,nal at nrownlnK. Tho opposing candidates are Montana- Thcru conversed Henry Johnson. Stephens count> Ulem tho farmer, and Elmer L. Pulton. wMcll Would havo per also a former assistant attorney general. G. B. Fulton, who Is only 38 years old, accused older oppou- iuaii to "master" was awarded students ents of sponsoring the Elmer indelibly Into mollon picture county schools. Fulton filing and cx-Gov. John- One group of certificates will Ished with Its users. Tho slrango method of expres- sion, which Scott was the only Attendance And Spelling Awards To Be Presented J. .W Huff, county school sup- erintandent, today was busy for a' time affixing his signature to n number of certificates to bu In Pontoloc McALESTER. May. OT) Mrs. Lydla C. Jones, 92, who liv- ed in Montague county, Texas, as early'as 1854 when frontier clashes with Indians woro com- mon, died at tho home ot a dau- ghter. Mrs. T. E. Wllklns, near Klowa, lato Tuesday. Funeral services will be held tomorrow at the Wllklns homo. Springfield, lamb followed her to school, but May takes her goat firmly In hand and leads It there. No, Ihe teacher doesn't object May Devereaux Is tho tea- cher at Bowerman school and takes her pot goat to school for tho children to study, ston, declaring "there should be a charged that "some- body has put tho Idea In this man's head to fllo against me. Tho law makes no provision for differentiating In any way In tho caso of filings under Identi- cal names. Tom Anglln', Gov. Murray's candidate for governor. Issued a statement today saying be was "adverse to uncertainty and con- fusion at tho ballot box" and de- claring the election board should "find a way for tho voter to eas- ily Identify the person for whom ho wishes to vote and his rota should bo counted for that candi- date. "Any willful and deliberate filing for tho purpose of confus- ing tho voter should he con- demned and ho added. W. M. Darnell, Stlllwater, runner-up" for tho democratic (.Continued on Paso 4, No. aim. Knitted Snake Denver "There's a big snake In my back shrieked a feminine voice In tho oar ot an operator at police headquarters. Officers hastened to the homo of Mrs. Charles H. Thomas. They had no trouble. Tho "snake" proved to be a knitted belt colled In tho grass. Yes, Mrs. Thomas did remember drop- ping tho bolt. Doubling Up Denver Arthur Taylor, taxi driver, got only ono passenger when ho called for Mrs. Ronald Heath at her residence, Bcforo he'd driven far, Taylor found ho had two fares. Mrs. Heath had given birth to a son Taylor sought tho nearest hos- pital on tho doublo quick. co to students who havo not boo li absent or tardy during the school year. The number ot theso Is about up to normal despite In- roads of measles and mumps. Huff states.' For tho first tlmo under his administration. Huff Is making special awards for proficiency In spelling. The attractive certifi- cates will go to a surprlHliiKly large number ot boys and over the county. Huff offered theso certificates In order lo Induce more Interest In spelling.generally In the grade and high schools of tho county. Nineteen stales bad nudist col- onies last summer, but lliey're expeclcd to bo outstripped by others this year. Greater returns for tho amount invested News Classified Adi.   

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