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Ada Weekly News Newspaper Archive: August 25, 1932 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Weekly News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Weekly News, The (Newspaper) - August 25, 1932, Ada, Oklahoma                             THE ADA WEEKLY NEWS VOLUME XXXII ADA. OKLAHOMA. THURSDAY, AUGUST 25, 1932 NUMBER 22 STRIKING IOWA FARMERS HALT TRUCKS j Victim of Ada; Several Projects Lopped Off, Others Added; Hawks Says Agreement Posiible MONEY Diagonal State Road Recom- mended by Miss Thomas Given Approval OKLAHOMA CITY. A'lg. clgantlc federal emergency aid highway program wan return'd to the state hlgh- commission by federal engi- neers today with suggestions tliat Cnr Collision Others Suffer Injuries UVMil Idilll) I Juki- Wilson, aged 1'ifl. illrd .il tin- Illrooo hospital Sunday night iit o'clock from Injuries received, In it oar crash hero mi North: llroadway almnl Sundayi afternoon. Tin- rar which WHson was! ilrlvltiK and one driven liy C. I llryan. of Moiilone. Cal at Ilioudway and Sixth Htr an inn- of tin- oars attempted pass a parked car. Invosllg ilnrs i reported tlii- accident unavoid- able Painful lifinl Injuries wore also' numerous changed In- made. V. Smiley, local federal engineer, made the rorommooda- tloiiK lii-fiiri- Ham Hawks, emu- inlxHltin rlialrinan. following a conference u  bureau of Hawks Hald that personally wan willing t" agree to federal rccniiimoiidallnim for tins west side of tin- stale, "I do not think II will lake inori- than four or five days to n-ai-h an agreement with fi-di-ral bu- ri-un." Il'- di'cllned to fiirlhi-r because of tin- absence froin tin- raidtol of Commissioner suffered Mrs. M. E. Hays mill ln-r daughter. KHa Moul- tun, liotli of 'Ada. who were with Wllsiin. Mryiin. ilrlvi-r of tin- sec- iinil rar, his. falhi-r, Charles llryan and lirotln-r Hi-i-. won- alid given first aid Irtxilmonl for minor Injuries. Tin- Hryaiis are farmers mill llvi- fuur miles north nf Ada on highway is. Wilson IH survived l.y his wid- ow and oni1 MUM, alHO liy two more Iliun l.v a fnnni-r marriage. fiindn wan nvallutili-. ,irraiigomonts liav.- not wan ri-rallcil also Iliat com- Colton Season of 1932 Opens Here With Mnlloy Win- ning Premium PEACEFUL Undeterred by Threat of Of- ficers to Keep Them Out Of Southern rnntotiic cnunty'H first halo of rnttnti k'amo In I-'rlday. Tin1 owner j was Charl.-y Mallny, who lives' near Ahloso and has established a reputation [nr a 1110111; the ourllist every year to bring cot-1 ton Into Ada. Mallny received. In addition to price for Ills halo paid by the Choctaw Cotton Oil company. a premium of mailo up by businessmen of Ada. I n? LATHItOP MACK lit- also receives a year's sub-1 Stirr-Wrlun Hcrlptlon to the Ada Weekly! tlENTON. III.. Aug. News l.v virtue of hlf feat. Mai- Talk of martial law "Unroil a loy owiis the land which pro- eonferenro today of IlllnoU na- j ear's PUN TOJftWP THERE Predict Other Miners Will Quit Work When Expedition Arrives Thin picture, from the heart of the mlilwr: market In the cmirxe of their blockade wh midweHt "farm strike" zone. Miows fanners near City. Iowa, halting a milk truck en route to hlch Is to force an Inciease In the prices they receive. Observe the nall-stllildeil hoards llrit lire l-ilil across roailt to puncture tires of trucks tryhiK to run the blockade, anil the cable that the men are A deadlock ensued when lln- farmers per 100 pound for their milk, as aualnst the SI.70 offered by the distributors, l.oai'ors In the "farm strike" movement from sever'al states, attending a iiioetlns of the National l-'arnn-rs' Holiday Association at Des Molnes. declared ilie nioveinent is Hpieaillim. Restrained From Tearing Up Pipelines of Union Crude Cumpnny J. P. Mi-Keel. OKLAHOMA CITY. Aug. 24.-- Several stretches of grading throe-Judge district court and drainage and gravel in west- tenuiorarlly restrained Cl- ern Oklahoma were ellmlnati-l Murray, the governor's Innii plans returned by the fed- Jmllliary 'prorntlon officer, from oral bureau. Some paving proj- pipelines of tin- were eliminated from the on Transport Corp. fuderal altl program as recom- liiended by eiigliu-erit while others were added. Tho bureau suggested paving a few gaps where commission plans call fin grading and drain- age. llnwlis said that while part of bis proposed gravel for Oklahoma had boon i Murray was not nniuod as llloutenaiit colonel of the national guard. In which capacity he di- rects proratlon enforcement In the Oklahoma City field, hut as an Individual. Tin- restraining older was issued at the of Sltl While, attorney, as the Injunction hear- Inal.-d. he would iisltiK ahead slat'- with II'- oil the lillHSi-ll I'ellolelllil ICiu-p.'s riMhl aualnst military and ,corporation control of Murray, a White said Clrero I. .MM TlHUiiii-.' llonil ;illstant cousin of I'.uv. WlllliHii ill. Murray, hnil threatened The bureau approved proposals pipeline ronnei-tlniiM of III" headi-d by of Miss Maude Thomas of llea ver. rommlssloner. for a diagonal 'bluhway In lbi  In charge of the local unit. Mr. Stein hat; already moved III, he and Mrs. Stelti being at home at SIM Kast Twelfth. They have a son who will he n junior In .the I'lilvorslty of Minnesota this scholastic year. The new concern will buy and casing and line pipe for the oil fields. The owners consider tills the Ideal location for oper- ations ciivorlngnot only the toloc county fields but the Sotnl- ,11010 county fields, and all other fields, south and east of In-ro. The plant located at llo'i North llroatlway. nients on Stale Highway 14 from to Selling, and pavement 'governor would comment on I In; junior. The governor declaring In- to t Clinton mi S. 270 from llhigor llrldgeporl, It was report-d. l-'ederal olflclals were said to have suggested pavlni: a Bap from Sllllwator north on Slate High- way 1 and to have proposed that Instead of construction of H'> miles of paving In tin- vicinity of Calvin, eight miles he built there and eight miles on tho I'. S. 7'J gnp between Klowa and Atoka. "The program has not yet been approved or disapproved." Smiley said. "We have 1100 to upend. The commission outlined 17.000.000 worth of projects. Wo recommended elim- ination of some of these because of the limited flnatios. It Is up to the commission to take tin- next step." Battery F One of Finest. 1 F. A. Band Leader in 45th Division Col. those court orders." Miirrny said tin- order had been served at noon. At the Itu.ssell hearlliK. attor- neys onuaK'-il In strenuous ment over the iiuestlon of C.ov. i Murray's rluht to extenil mili- tary aulhoilty to proratlon. A. lijchardson. corporation commis- sion attorney, closlni; a four hour defense of the governor's move by declarlnc: "We ore not trying to confis- cate property of the Ulissell CD. We are trying to keep them from flouting the law and WILL POT TO Two Business Mouses and Con- Declares Leaders of Farmers Strike Fail to Keep Promise Of Order tents Destroyed: Others Damaged New Expedition Headed in Di- rcc.ion of Hard Reported DISORDER BRINGS THREIU Sheriff Will Summon Force of Deputies to Handle Situation KONAWA, A fire of undetermined orlcln _ here Sunday destroyed the build-! and stocks of the Collins j day said the Japanese forces In SHANC.HAi. AUK. 22.   a day. agirlnst 'which tin) Invaders nro They lined the county liorder to the north anil west, watching for the advance guaid of Invaders. STAI'NTON. III.. AUK. A motor caruvnn four miles carrying striking miners, left here today fur an Invasion of Ilin Southern Illinois coal field where they will attempt to dlri- uade their fellow miners from working under the new J5 wacc scale. Mine leaders propheslml irotest march would be the est labor march In tin- history of the country. They esllmuted that at least would he In tho line of march before they camped tonight at Dowell. When word came frnm lln county that authorities would not permit the dissenting miners to enter, the strike leaders sanl "It's nil a bluff. Christian comi- ty officials said the stunt' thing last w-ek whun wo marched nn withdrew their Franklin rs to delay Taylorvlllo. They of tin- Trimble, clerk representatives, was accompanied by a letter sl-ticd by Chairman Allot- 1'nmorono showing that 437 loans totaling '.r, had noon mad- during tin; 10-day pe- riod and Increases In loans 7'authorized prior lo July 'totaled bandits. They described tho entry reeling the flight from llm Itiirro-Monlpeller airport In Ver- mont sent tin-in n i i tln-lr hop until tomorrow morn- Hoards, dldn t they Ing and In the meanwhile lend'county will do tin- all possible assistance to Pot-r- vvlth orders that them HOII and solh.-rg. to ho no arms among Peterson and Polberg had tak- j marchers, leaders In dm ran uf en off from a Now York airfield local contingents searched storday morning a few They said no before 1.00 llncbkon left were found. nl-to llarre. When tho "Oroon Moun-1 banned. The "blc push aln Hoy" took off In Vermont tho York plane was but an tint as purely to obtain his releas and not a military invasion. The Japanese charged, how- ever, that allies of Marshal Chang Hsiao-Hang, deposed Man- churlan war lord now In Ivlpln-. 21 boon responsible for Islil- i molo's capture. On Highways 75 and 34 tho picket-strikers still wore stopping trucks and forcing them to un- load produce before proceeding Into Council Illuffs. Important to tho large markets In Omaha', its sister city Missouri river. On Hoad 34 pickets threw rail- road ties and bridge timbers on the highways. Savory, an organizer for the Farmers' Union, said he was not abl- to control tho picketing strikers. Sheriff I-alnson said. The letter said of the total amount loaned, was authorized to banks and trust companies Including to Jehol province officially order of Formerly bad been new not allocated In the things In Manchuria. it was a part of Chlhll dominated by aid In tin- reorganization of 1 province. China. f 101 30r> to agrl- olplng. Later maps Miriw It nel- closeil banks; across the culture credit corporations; 13.- building and loan issoclatloiu; to In- surance companies; JflO.lfiO to a joint stock land hank; J.ISO.7In livestock credit corporations; 47.000 to mortgase loan com- panies, and to rail- roads. Insmiinonlatlon than In preced- ing yl-ars. Orchestra, vocal quartets an 1 soloists were provided for a nui.i- ber of from the rank.-i 1 of the IfiOth F. A. band, nml to formulate rules and proVfde and put both tint! distribution for storagt' the feed. Murray Bald furmers have rod to furnish the feed If II. fo bor Is supplied to harvest of- la- To those who have no faith In government, xvo want to call at- tention lu the regularity with which bills always arrive no1 la- tor than tho second of Hit' mouth. over cilled for many demand performances. The two units, including pay of officers and enlisted, moi.. men employed to take earn of the guard efiiulpraent and h-jrses, the guard equipment and horses, ducted In connection with the battery, hrlns u payroll Into that runs between and (Continued on Trite O, No. 2) Striken Two Victories DES MOINES. la.. Aug. Two victories marked the course of the midwest farm strike for hlsher prices today, as the movement spiead In some quar- ters anil receded In others. Inte-- ference with rail transportation continued. noth victories were scored in Nebraska, where milk producers gained higher prices for their products. At Omaha, officials of the lowa-Sehraska Co-operativo Milk consented to pay 12 per hundredweight for milk, compared with a previous top of J1.45. while at Lincoln milk dealers agreed to par SI.SO an Increase of 40 cents over the previous flsure. More than 1.000 agricultural- ists were assembled In camps (Contlnnnl on I'ago fl. 5o. Trlmhlo. In making public officially report, following his decision China. Thursday that he had no other! choice under the law, took coptlon to a statement by Ilepre-j gentallvo. Treadway of Massachu-j estts, a conferee on the relief bill, that bis decision to make) ther as a part of China nor Man cbnria. The now Japanese maps of the recently created Manchukuo. tin! Independent nation sponsored by Japan, show Jehol as a part of Manchukuo. None of the terri- tory has been recognized by for- eign governments as Independent, remains a part hour's flight away. was conducted 'along military lines, with .12 sergeants 111 charge of preserving order. Tlnv almost mot hours later! ,'t llellevlllt. n.Oflll men aMom- as hot'h tried to fight their lo KO ll. the through a blinding fog which en-1 Illinois shrouded the New Koundland transporlallon could be found coast. When I.eo ami Ilochknn 1.500. They were lo set their Plain- down on the H" "'ll1" "r beach nt Iliirgoo. they wore told Staunton at Mascoutah. Approximately of 111" diggers wt-re from Springfield. III., win-re they had gulhereil this morning for an organization mooting In a park. A contingent of 500 men we.iv and Hochkon lot some of the I'nnn. Mich carryliiK nit of tin- tlr.-s of their for a week and an Amtrl- o that tin- whoelH would onion flag. n the loose sand and continued The ramrun was enulpped with heir flight to Harbor Draco. Al-i" al'l Jutflt to cure fur though Darby's Harbor Is butltboM- who might becomn ill or 0 miles from tin- place, com- Injured. Woiiiun'ii auxIIUry .'groups carried the food and will by townspeople that the Peterson Scilhorg plane had flown over the same spot but 20 minutes bofot" ami had continued nn. After spending an iincnmfor'- able night tin the beach, TOKYO. A state- ment attributed to official quar- ters today paid It was only a question of time before strong action would bo taken to make. ,Johol province unquestionably a public the reports was to gain t of npwlv created Imle- John N.'i--.. favor with Speaker Garner. uch a charge ridiculous." Trimble said. "The law gives me no discretion In the matter. Speaker C.arner has never at- tempted to Influence me In discharge of my duties. I considered every objection raised to the publishing of the reports and no one has to me a single decUlon of the court lo mpport such objections. "My attorney. South Trimble jr.. cited supreme court decisions Continued on 1'age 4. No. O state of Manchrukiio. This assertion came a few hours behind dispatches from Japanese correspondents at Chin- chow. Manchuria, stating that a Japanese detachment, stationed near Pelplaon Jehol, had routed several hundred Chinese after a sharp battle. The war office, however, de- nied thai tin- Japanese army had assumed the offensive In Jehol or contemplated at present a largf scale Invasion of that province that heretofore had divided China, proper from Manchuria. ntinlcatlons are none too mil but the hiiro facts that Sol- nnd Peterson bad crashed jnd wore uninjured reached th" ulrport here. COTTON ABOVE EICHT GENTS IN MARKET NEW YOIJK. Aug. 24.- Colton advanced 12.75 to J2.D5 a bale today on extremely heavy buying based on bullish Implica- tions of the weekly weather re- port. All contracts sold well aliov tht> 8-cent level for the first time, on the current The census taker found three communities In Colorado without a single radio set. are reported preparing for u rapid influx of tourists. iipi-rvlsit the feeding of Mo-tt of the, carried food enough for four lays but they said they could longer If necessary. I.AMH.l'llltKHK CROHS ATI.A.NTICJ HAKKI.V fJIIIItALTAH, AUK. Five young landlubbers, all un- dergraduates of Princeton uni- versity, have conquered the At- lantic In a two-master In 49 dayii despite storm and calm. The adventure began In York July 2. and will end, for the time being at least. In Mar- nellli-s, when the craft reaches there. The. venturesome team lost In a heavy blow and ipent I-4 days In various of dead" calm. They are: William ery. New York; William Crow. New York; Standlsh Backui, De- troit; Ashley Hardy. Hoston; and Itouert Kcldle. Baltimore.   

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