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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: May 31, 1966 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - May 31, 1966, Ada, Oklahoma                               The Sooner amateur agricultural experimenter, announces plans .to cross a pofafo with a sponge; He recfcons it taste as good as a regular potato, ____ mm but think of all the gravy it will hold. 63RD YEAR NO. 68 ADA, OKLAHOMA, TUESDAY, MAY 10 PAGES 5 CENTS WEEKDAYS, 10 CENTS SUNDAY By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS [thing in his basket." A .housewives' budget brigade! "All prices have skyrocketed thaf tfnuprn- Huf mpaf IS extrfimelv Mfih." today that govern- ment price indexes fairly reflect a hard fact of life in the 1960s: it is costing more feed the family. and more to Many housewives seem firmly convinced that food prices just about doubled in the past year. They didn't, but government figures, supported by an inde- but meat is extremely before.' said the Pittsburgh reporter. The Baltimore surveyor said "an employe of one of the su- permarkets included in my can- vass claimed he is spending more time changing the shelf prices of goods than stocking the shelves themselves." "The average housewife finds Sunday Combat Victim pendent Associated Press sur-; herself buying a lower .quality vey in March, show that the item to keep her budget bal- cost of a typical week's -shop- ping went up nearly 7 per cent. Meats, however, have risen sharply. Based on the govern-, ment's national price averages, it cost to buy one pound each of sirloin steak, hamburg- er, pork chops, ham, bacon and lamb chops in mid-March, compared with in mid- March of 1965 a rise of 21.5 per cent- By contrast, the other items on the shopping list of the AP's budget brigade rose only 1.5 per cent. The AP's budget brigade figures, and the government's, should enable skeptical shop- pers to judge for themselves. The AP housewives themselves started out highly skeptical on their 12-city spot survey. They said food prices over-all unquestionably high, al- though many a penny could be said .the Detroiter. "I watch pennies closer than ever The AP budget brigade turned up a wide spread'in prices-for less the checker's-total bill was .in the first store, in the other. Reports-by both sets of check- ers indicated that pork-.prices, 1965, in Boston compared j fleeted in April statistics an-, with and 90.6 nounced by-'the government a ULj Ct VY1UC vJJI- COM f i individual items from store to which had- been in orbit for store in the same city. But by months, were beginning.to level the time they had priced all the out or decline, although still far it-ems on the'list, the total tend- higher than a. year ago. ed to be about the same. j -Government checkers-report- In Baltimore, for example, ied an average price of one store had an 89-cent special for pork chops in Baltimore on sirloin steak while a second compared with in Febru- store charged Neverthe- ary and 93.2 cents in March in Cleveland compared with and 90.8 cents, and in Detroit compared with and cents. AP's 'budget brigade, found j general agreed that there, are their three-store average -price several ways to resist advanc- for pork chops to be in ing prices. These include buying Baltimore, in Boston, i only the items on a prepared in Cleveland and 99 cents list, placing a limit on the total in Detroit. jto be spent, eliminatingluxuries The tendency for food prices! and buying less expensive in general to .level out was re-! grades. Adan Dies In Vietnam A young Ada Marine, Lance Corporal Noel D. Marr, 25, was killed Sunday in Combat in Viet- nam. He is the first serviceman from Ada to die in the fighting there. He was the'son of Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Trobaugh, 817 East 14th, Ada. The Trobaughs were advised of their son's death in a tele- gram from the commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps. determined bargain-hunting from store to store. Some made the point that few housewives can spare so much time from their other home-making duties. If a housewife does all her shopping at one store, the re- searcher in St. Louis.said, "It doesn't matter much which store you shop at they'll get all your money anyway." "Each store's weekly bar- gains really were she reported. "They cut off as much as 20 or 30 cents per item. But they seem to make it up somewhere else." The Associated Press budget brigade priced a list of 38 to '40 fpodv items, from potatoes-'to sirloin steak, in .three super- markets in each of the 12. cities on March 10. The results were set alongside returns from U. S. Department of Labor checkers who shopped a wider range of stores in the same cities at approximately the same time. (The govern- ment checkers also covered stores in .50 smaller cities for 1C U.W. "I------------- "J YT J Preliminary details are; graduating from Hayes and sketchy. The -telegram stated Ada Junior High School. He at- Cpl. Marr died from "multiple tended Ada High School for two wnnnris" .from an years but1 graduated from Hor- ace Mann High School. He joined the Marine Corps seven years ago and planned to Bill Lee Heads Community Chest Drive This Year G. William "Bill" Lee, well- known Ada businessman, will head the fund drive for the Ada Community Chest next fall. Lee accepted the post of fund drive chairman this week. He is well-versed -in Commu- nity Chest activities. He'has u6v. --------o'-M-served on the board and was North Carolina, he was in Ada president of the organization last grew up.in for aT25-day'furlough in wnen-jt mounted a revital- He had been in Vietnam since 'make a career of military ser- March 21. Serving as a grenade TT- -------1 launcher, he was attached to Co. L, 9th Marines, 3rd Marine Division. At the time of his death, he was participating in Operation Georgia, a Marine sweep against enemy vice. He had. served two.tours of duty in Okinawa before his assignment in Vietnam and had also served -at Marine stations in "California, Rhode'Island and North Carolina. anccF ------j strong- Originally a'clerk-typist, Marr holds in the north of Vietnam.! volunteered for guer- He was in the general Da Nan'g rilla unit approximately a year area but the exact location was i ago. After intensive m not given. Cpl. Marr week ago showing that over-all food costs, rose only .1 of 1 per cent over the March averages. The AP budget brigade in 7 Per Cent From 1965 The AP's Detroit checker said prepared foods now is on the [advantage of their loss leaders n T Unrrin advances in the processing of market 'that I begin to suspect foods often beguile the .shopper.j the cook may be done away into spending .more than she j intended The budget brigade said shop- "Before, it was canned in several stores now it's'frozen peas with minia-1 money but may prolong the mushroom chore of buying the groceries ture onions or in said. "Corn once came packed in water. Now it is frozen in pure butter." The Cleveland member of the beyond that which a busy house- wife can spare. The Philadelphia checker said: "I find it necessary to de- ifie ylcvcjailu IllcjUJUei ui LIICIOOIU, HUM team remarked that "so com-1 vote considerably more time to plete and elegant an.array all three stores to take an enemy explosive device. Pre- sumably it was a booby trap or possibly a mine. ___________ which no price breakdown is In .the 12 cities where the AP 'paralleled the government sur- vey, average total bills were remarkably similar and in the case of St. Louis came out at precisely the same figure The government goes about tts.monthly price-gathering in a coolly scientific way, using 125 checkers working under field supervisors and supported by computers at home base. The AP survey was a matronly af- fair -on a much smaller scale Javits Seeking No. Two Slot? He Has Backing WASHINGTON (AP) It is an American tradition that no politician runs openly for vice president. Sen. Jacob K. Javits isn't-exactly breaking that tra- dition but he-may be-bending it. In-a'field-where few men care to: publicly venture, Javits quietly is trying to narrow down to 'himself the GOP's choice.of a 1968 vice presiden- tial candidate. Although the New York Re- publican insists publicly he has made no decision, he has told friends privately he would be willing to give up his Senate seat to get .the Republican sec- ond-place nomination two years from now. Behind Javits's willingness to risk his political future is his desire to become the first Jew- ish candidate on a major party ticket. It is his private opinion that this would be a crowning achievement for a political career in which he has gone all out for civil rights. It also is Javits's view that if John F. Kennedy had not won the Democratic presidential nomination in 1960, it would NOEL D. MARR ary. He was actually en-, route overseas then. .He flew to Oki- nawa for another brief training period and then joined Marine units in Vietnam in March. He was based at a village approxi- mately 11 miles southwest of Da Nang.- The Trobaughs said they heard from their son regularly. He recently told of participating in an action against a Commu- nist-controlled village. For the first time since 1961, the Village was freed from-Viet Cong con- trol and the road serving the village was opened to traffic. When he was killed, Cpl. Marr was on the final day of the Ma- rine' action and was due to be rotated to rear echelons for a rest period before going into combat again. He said he 'had not" had his boots off 'for more v than 'IS; minutes'- at'; a'time' -ih'.the lastrmonth. ;i-The-last letter the-Trobaughs received' fromHheir son was oh Saturday. On; Sunday, the official; .-.tele- gram came, on the.eve of Me- morial Day. His body will be.flown back to this'country and a''full mili- (See "Adan Page 2) iciu -va a- J.UUWI. nomination m wuuiu but following in the footsteps of been another decade be- Buddhists Meet With Viet Military Junta government checkers. 'AP housewives spiced findings with pointed comments about food prices like "exor- bitant" and "skyrocketing." Food prices make up only 22.5 per cent of the government's over-all cost of living index, which during the March-to- March period rose 2.5 per cent. However, it is food prices which the housewife encounters face to face every week Both AP and1 government checkers reported Cleveland to be the cheapest city for the over-all food bill. Government checkers came up with a figure of for 39 items, and the AP housewife found the same items for Government checkers found San Francisco to be the costliest city, with an average price of for' 39 items compared with reported by the AP checker. Costliest city in.the AP survey was Boston, with a.total of compared'with the gov- ernment finding of between the extremes came Chicago, De- troit, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, St Louis and Washington, D.C. AP's San Francisco checker called recent price rises in meat "exorbitant." "My budget-is strained to the breaking .commented the Cleveland housewife. The housewife in Washington complained that "some basic items 'of diet have increased over the past year.with no pub- licity bread .up 4 cents, milk up rice up 4 cents, pota- toes up 15 to-25 cents for 10 pounds." .Said the Chicagoan: manager of a store: I checked he had 600 the past 
                            

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