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Ada Evening News: Friday, December 28, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - December 28, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             ft. w..-milli.iiv .h. sald. charter say Joe ys. OSU Slows Down Go'Go Sooners; See Sports Page Kids Exhibit Yule Presents, See Page Ten 59TH YEAR NO. 247 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 28, 1962 10 PAGES 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Davis To Lease Turner By W. L. KNICKMEYER (NEWS. StaH Writer) DAVIS Defenders of the 'status quo at Turner'Falls may relax-again in their-armchairs. The deal's off. Probably, that is, Davis City Manager Foster Thomas told a NEWS reporter yesterday that the. city council had' reversed its stand on a proposal to lease the city-owned falls to a private development' enterprise for a 50-year period. Councilman had approved the proposal at a meeting Nov. 26 .and'called an election to submit the plan to Davis citizens Dec. '11. Subsequently, the election was' postponed to allow "further .Now, according to' Thomas, the-. whole: thing has been can- celled; The city manager refused to -go into details as'to the reasons for the council's decision. "Just say it-was a-disagreerhent over of the he said. However, there'was specula- tion that .the proposal'foundered on a clause which would-have allowed the lessees to.call on' .the city .to take back the whole, project, under certain- condi- reimburse the lessees for the amount 'spent on-it. Apparently the city fathers took a hard second look at this phase.of the proposed agree- in the world Davis would" find a mil- lion dollars or so if 'that clause were -put into .and de- cided to call the whole thing off. Under the terms-of the pro- posed' lease, Max Sulcer, .West Memphis, Ark., and Art Howell, Ardmore, would .have leased the falls.and surrounding 725-acre park for 50 paying the city a total of in rental over.the period, :Rental .would have'begun at for; the.first year an'd'in- creased'by annually .for. 18.years, until the yearly-rental' reached which'point it would remain "until expiration .of the.lease. The le'ss'ees proposed a luxury lodge, east "of the adding such .recreation, facilities as a nine-hole ing ranges, a' lighted tennis court and. a riding academy. When the .proposal..was first brought into public notice, a good deal-'of opposition not only.in.Davis but over the state. Opponents of .the move 'argued that a .spot of scenic, natural beauty like .Turner Falls (Continued on Two) Baptists Dedicate New Wing Sunday By GEORGE Sunday afternoon Ada' residents will have their first chance to take a look at the First Baptist Church's-.fabulous new Activities Building. The new structure will' be of- ficially dedicated in the morning worship service. Then an open house is set from p. m. until p. m. It .will begin with a ribbon cutting and a presentation of a key to the building from Con- tractor Mel Hart, contractor, to Sid Spears, chairman of the.build- ing committee. Any interested- person is invited. The .new, building represents a cost of exclusive of fur- nishings. It. was'designed by'Hoa- roe .architect. of, a.cherished dream for many members of the church. Years ago the area was used as a play- ground... Later a .tabernacle '.was built oij the site. It was used as a parking lot. For a time, it was felt'.the building -should be. '.con- structed on a site across Fif- teenth'. Then, finally, it was' de- cided 'to erect the building at its present location. Planning began when Dr. Roy McCIung was pastor of the church here. Financing-.began under Dr. Hubcr Drumright. Then last spring. Under the leadership of the church's'cur- rent minister, Dr. David- G. House, ground -was broken and construction began. And this week -Dr. Hause an- nounced the appointment of Dave Pritchard as director of the -new building. Pritchard has been serv- ing for eight years with the First Baptist Church in Oklahoma City. "We are really fortunate -to se- cure his Dr. Hause said. "He is unquestionably one of the finest leaders and workers in Christian recreation." Final operating plans and schedules -for the new building will await Prit- chard's supervision. He begins his work here on January 15. building is a splendid addi tion to the church's already im- pressive facilities here. It contains a huge gym with a stage at the south end, complete with'curtains, lights and other equipment. Seating, is available along the east wall of the big gym- The gym also serves "as a banquet area with a capacity for as many as 750 people or an addition assembly hall. K could easily seat people in .stand- ard seating arrangements. And that's not all. The gym, featuring, an unusual new floor, will double in brass. The floor was laid-in a striking parquet pattern of special 'hard woods. It received a .special cov- ering and will also serve as a realization" skatinjfTmk. And. there 'is .still. mqfe. Some classrooms are available. on the first. There is a handsome .lobby and office and. .east of. the entrance way is a modern, spark- ling soft drink fountain and snack bar' that will .'delight .the heart of any youngster. Divider doors are in. place in the big room running north from the fountain with ping po'ng, shuf- fle board and other recreations available. But there is still more. Shower, dressing room and locker facili- ties are ready for boys The gym is-, two-storied. along the street side, another tier of classrooms are 'ready 'at .the second story level; These are not finished at this date but as 'the need arises will be 'furnished and opened to serve'' the- church's young people. Some Sunday school 'departments' are already operating in the new building. Suspended accoustical tile is utilized through much- 'of the structure. Durable plastic tile was chosen for floor covering.-' The building- is handsome, striking. But it is .also built ...for durability and the 'treatment it .is bound to receive at th'e' hands ol hundreds of. active youngsters. Dr. Hause stressed'that the gen- eral public is .urged to, come out and attend Sunday's open house. (Continued on Page, Two) Monstrous Explosion Rips Wall BERLIN (AP) The biggest explosive assault ever against the Red wall dividing Berlin was car- ried out before dawn There .was no immediate indica- :ion of who set.the.blast. The explosion ripped a three- square hole in the wall and smashed 600-windows in neigh- coring 150 in a fire brigade headquarters. West Berlin police said it was the biggest explosive charge laid against the wall in'its 16 months of existence, although. previous smaller explosions have caused more damage'to the-wall itself. .They ''believed the people re- sponsible were- disturbed" at-their work. The charge-was: not em- iiedded in the wall before'it went off, which accounted for the-com- wall itself and the considerable it. v' .-.The explosion went., off; 100 yards- from the site: of. another explosion Dec..'16. .That timef three men-set a charge-and gave them- up-to-police before'it went off.' Both blasts; went, off .in the Jerusalemer 800. .yards from the U.S. Army's ..checkpoint Charlie, Nobody wasihurt in today's ex- plosion .but a weather shelter used by West Berlin police was' ripped apart- It was.-empty at the tune. "x- The explosion-was heard for miles. '-.The.East -Germans rushed six extra .border, guards to the hole, They ".took station..with' tommy guns pointing "through the hole toward .the'. West. West. Berlin .police -said 'they were hindred in their'.investiga- tion, by. the Vopos, .Easl guards are nicknamed. The" w'al jtself '.lies "about, -10' feet' on the East. Berlin" side: of. the actual boundary line.' When Western in- vestigators tried to -approach .'the wall, the'Vopos slipped off. their safety, catches and-threatened" to fire.. West police reported thai-Thurs- day'night noncom '6f.v the. army.got through the: barricades 'in uniform on West Berlin's north- ern border .unobserved: Dr. Takes New High Post Thalidomide Hero Heads Office To Pass Ort New Drugs .WASHINGTON (AP) Dr. 'Frances 0: Kelsey, hail- ed as national heroine 'for keeping thalidomide off .the' American to- day was put at the head of a new U.S. office' which j will pass on requests to test new drugs on humans. Her, appointment as director or the irivestigational-. drug branch j was part of a'. reorganization at the Food' and Drug1 Administra- tion's new drug division which was approved today by Secretary of'Welfare' Anthony J. Celebre'zze. j In a statement Celebrezze said the retooling the drug division intO'five branches'will permit the FDA.'to cope with its increased responsibilities in the'new'drug :ea. Strong Law's Enacted As a backlash of', the outcry over sedative Blamed for thou- sands of'infants born in .Europe October enacted a law giving the-FDA..stronger authority over production and sales of-prescription .drugs., To cany out the new law and to make administration changes the a rash of tight- er regulations which after being discussed and criticized "are'now being redrafted. An FDA spokesman-said today that .the regulations dealing' with the testing of drugs on humans will be issued fairly soon. Dr. Kelscy's investigational drug branch, according to'- the FDA'; "is tablished to evaluate, reports of proposed' clinical .tests of new drugs" which manufacturers: and others will, submit -in -compliance with, the inv'estigatipna.1, drug reg- ulations. Who'Knows? what :it (the' new consist of "'un- til the Kelsey told a'newsman.' But .'for which she will receive yearly, will be to check oh reports of 'firms proposing to test new drugs on humans. She will be operating'-under.new powers 'which' give the'FDA. au- thority, among other' things, ..to: .substantial' evidence that a drug''is effective: as well (Continued on Page'Two) Delay Construction Of IH-35 For More Than Two Years High temperature (n Ada Thursday was 52; low Thursday, night, 38; reading at 7 a. m. OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy, northwest, .portion cloudy, oc- casional rain or drizzle; partly cloudy west rain ending east to- night; Saturday, clear to partly cl.o.udy west, considerable- cloudiness east a .little warmer Saturday and east and south to- night; north-, west to'47 southeast- High Sat-' urday-48 to 58, Lyons Says Charge Is Correct OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) A charge that, political interference has put Okla- homa two years -behind schedule in constructing Interstate 35 south of Oklar homa City was hurled to- day. Keith Cartwright, execu- tive vice president of -the Oklahoma Good Roads and Streets Association, said the Highway Commission has permitted politicking to in- terfere with work, on the proposed -superroad: His charge was substantiated to a degree by Highway Director Frank Lyons, who said the com- mission yielded to pressure from such towns as.. Pauls Valley to re- route the highway to the east, costing an additional million. Federal approval has not 'been obtained for the eastern' route which would be 2.8' miles longer aud has been pushed by 'former Gov. Roy J. Turner. Turner could not be reached immediately. Lyons -said, he- -plans to recom- mend to the commission that 'it return to the original route, which puts the highway on the -west side of Pauls Valley, "Wynnewood and Davis; we will sub- inif'the' western -'route- my opinion', the 'commission' will-want to submit the eastern Ly_- ons said. .Cartwright found out from Washington-officials -that the state Highway Department .is ov- er two years behind on 135 be- tween Purcefl 'and Ardraore. "We also found out the depart- ment has. had political' interfer- ence. They 'have made over 1C line surveys; IThe trouble is that every town; that way wants it. to come through town or just as close as possible. "To show where less, political interference has .gone on, there is 135 north 'of Oklahoma City. No- body "much 'interfered there and they got -it built.- "We don't promote one road ov- er another, but .this- is different Politics has dragged us "It gets 'down. to. this if yoi: follow the line between "PurceU and Ardmore everybody wants, it would cbst-.about "However, the -main .thing-is that Oklahoma-is about'two years behind time. fin- ished by. 1972. V "Frank. Lyons' .is not getting anywhere! He can' t get. the com- mission to That's the trou- Lyons conceded .the.project-was about' two 'years behind schedule. He said. the cost while" the', eastern route' is estimated 'at. "We 'are'. aware that ;the. hinges -on whether the1 Bureau' oi (Continued -on -Page Two) HOW ABOUT A SUNDAE This ii JOtU .fountain-snack bar in Activities Building at Ada's First Baptiit Church. This u but of many featurts that will tht hugt installation-to-youris ptoplt-- (NEWS Staff Photo) BONFIRE City-firemen were concerned with this fire last night." It roared for most of the night in an_ behind thi College; near Norris Stadium. Fire Department the Illegal, that there are ordinances oft refuse within Ada A resident of the t re was apparently'started witlTgasoline, as.it "exploded" into, flame.. He said 'j. sounded l.ke a .car wreck when the fire was touched An unidentified auto .was reported leaving the scene immediately Though fed only :by rubbish, it caused more serious sparks fired nearby brush. (NEWS Statt Photo By Bob Heaton) "______________ In BRUSSELS, Belgium Katanga: troops were reported fighting: U.N. forces in Elisabeth- vjlle today with.-casualties on both sides. Diplomatic 'reports reach- ing ;Europe from -the African trou- ble'.'spot' said' ..efforts, were being 'made'for, a-cease-fire.''. The-.Belgian radio, quoting, dip- lomatic '.described '.fight- ing as very violent. It representative' Eliud' Mathu -was reach Tshbmbe 'of was Low Bid On Bond Issues Ada's' City.'Council met Thurs- day evening to'-receive bids on three of four-issues approved.in- Offered, were general obligation bonds: on the .'the and. new :fire fighting 000. Four firms submitted bids. The successful low ;bid" was a joint submission made .by'the.Liberty Natipnal Barilr, of Oklahoma City, and 'the First National Bank and Trust Seperate' bids- were'.submitted on each issue and L'ib'ertyNation-. aland Ada's First, National'were' low on'all offerings. .They .bid, cent. on city hall 'a- 2t yeat-issue.; They bid' io' per' 'cent on the' air-: port .years.. cent 'on 'th'e! fire 'equipment, a year issuef7, -_ ..Other firms bidding were Shoe- Milburn, Co., Oklahoma' bid: by_ Oklahoma City's First Nation-' al Bank'and: the. 'Oklahoma State. Bank in Ada. WillvBe Djdh7 OKLAHOMA. CITY (AP) By- next 991 per 'cent of Southwestern Bell.TeJephone'Co.'s telephone's in Oklahoma will be. on dial1..service. said to' have begun--ThursdayIILN.-'shells had fallen on a hos- nisht on'the outskirts .of the Ka-. pital, wounding a nurse. Tshombe tang-a capital'arid continued all night.- the British govern- ment-said .and. British consuls; in-Elisabethville-.sought also, to arrange a cease-fire. Reports from Nofthew Rhoder sia quoted Tshombe as' saying the U.N. troops 'were shelling the Eu- ropean quarter of'Elisabethville, and endangering civilian lives. The reports said-Tsh'ombe claims said U.N. forces opened-fire with- out warning in the European .sec- tion" of that Eu- ropeans were caught in the thick of a' battle, according to the re- ports., Katanga has''.seceded from the Congo central1'government based hi Leopoldville and the United Nations has .been pressing-Tshom- b.e 'to bringMiis 'mineral-rich -prov- ince under Leopoldville's control. The larger; part of-'the United'Na- tion's Congo.force Is reported to be in Katanga. It was the second shooting re- ported this -week between U.N.; and Katahgan troops in the Elisa- bethville' area. Heavy shooting continued for several hours on, Christmas, the U.N. command'claimed its forces did not fire a shot. The Katangans. shot- .down- a.- UiN.- helicopter, killed- an Indian lieutenant and beat up -other..members of the crew. '_______ Arid Liberate Homeland .MIAMI, Fla. (AP) Talk of another-possible- thrust against Fidel Cuban, exile colony today, .even as freed .prisoners ..of the, ;last at- .reunited- with- .newly The than .the African Pilot, the .vessel th'at took' food ".and-.-medicine, plies-to Castro.-'for release'of; captives 1961, Bay dfvPigs invasion: ".We.' shall proclaimed- Manuel 'the attack along.' witli other '.invasion, chiefs, met with'. P.residerifr.Kenheay'iin" Pahn Beach Thursday. "Papa- as ex-pris- oners call i the1 -man''in-' the "White. .arinouncedfthat'he will at-' tend' 'a Orange Bowl bri- gade. fu-; '.hire- ahtirCastrb. -actio_nr e'd, tliis .'I.THe: Cub'aniKevolutfohary -'.Couh-; cil, which .dJipafchea'StBeTjrigade- to "An "irrevoc'able'.'.'Jfesolutiori; unites' arms'.-'-in.-'hand- the' .country ...frbhiy j V '463 ren ...on the-African Pilot' we're 'quartered in- a spaci- ous, Miami building provided by the Cuban Refugee .-.Center. .-The center, operated by p'artment of Health, and Welfare, also provided meals until they ,gpt set- tled. 'of friends or: relatives. Cuban Families Commit- New York at- torney James B. Donovan and with U.S. government help, .spon- sored .the return-of.the prisoners, .re: iatives'wilicome; next, .boatr'thak..takes., sup- plies of .medicines and.'foodstuffs 'to Havana .will "return, .with more said a committee Official .was no immediate .con- firmation of this. told the Cuban-'delega- in Patai Beach, -that "he some, day' to'visit a-free 'Cuba." Artime ''the'.Presi- .dent military :sion aridi fiis'-first-assist- bans', in '.the yOraiigey'Bowl' monies in !which .the .'will- give. Kennedy their invasion flag.: Ada Councilman Approve Another Paving District City'c'ouncilmen Thursday eve- ning, authorized the -formation of a paving- -district. It-will be No.: -76- and -is "the fourth district formed., .seeking, funds under- the' Public Work's "Acceleration Act. it secures approval, it means' -government funds -will for'one- half the total- cost. 'Local property get -bargain- paving .at normal, rate. 'Those districts formed' mat are seeking.' P'WAA-.'.grants1 upon securingr'tKe''.n'ecessary grant. If does- iotv" materialize, the .district.-1.will; b_e. dropped... submitted; (by.-, of. -Qighscfaool. to iBel- jnont; Eighteenth CKerry ,to .Broad-- way; to WJiitersmltH1 Park; city- limits'; "Scenic to' city: .'Emits; paving .-'Sta'diurh' Drivel V. city ;limits -'Francis :to Bolton; Bol-' to 'city 'limits; How- Two) V   

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