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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 25, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 25, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Joe Zilch, who notices the Co.or.do coach, former director, has resigned, saysthis should be what Deer Hunters Set -All Summer For Hunt, Page 12 O.U. Rambles Over H inkers, See Sports Page ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 36 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY U.S. Officials Believe Russians Will Dismantle All Soviet Bases On Cuba In Pullouts Last Stage COUGARS ON THE MARCH Ada High School boomed into Class A football playoffs here last Friday night by whipping arch-rival Gushing, Norrii Stadium. Above, a phalanx of Cougars march onto the field under bridge provided by supporting "Mack, the cardboard Cougar mascot. The Adans return to the foot- ball playoHi after two years absence. They play unbeaten Miami here next Friday night. The march under "Mack with a touch for good luck is traditional for A.H.S. playeri. Taxpayers Ponder Bond's Fate By GEORGE GURLEY December 4 will decide the fate of four separate propoisitions which are scheduled in a bond election here. The four measures will seek approval for the issuance a to- tal of in bonds: The largest measure seeks en- dorsement 'for in .bonds." A federal grant of is also being, requested to bolster this fund. This money will be used to construct a new city hall, con- struct a new service building for the water department and repair existing city installation at Seventh and Townsend. Another proposition asks ap- proval for in bonds to fi- nance a new traffic signal and control system for the city. A third measure solicits ap- proval of in bonds' for use at -the Ada Municipal -Airportj Here again, a federal is' 'This" will' sup? plement funds from local bonds. Money here -will be -used to re- surface the north-south runway, install a new lighting system: and. repair present facilities.- Finally, authorization is asked for to finance the purchase of a new- "pumper" for the Ada fire department.-, The total of projects is With federal grants, how- ever, the value of the. over-all -pro-. gram reaches All indica- tions are .that both' federal grants will be received. or.' reject all of "any plirt of 'the program at the polls. Under, the to a resi- be a' re gistered, tax paying voter. Taxes must have been" paid within a 12 month pe- .riod prior to the 'election.' And these taxes', must have been paid on either personal or real property, nothing else. In- tangible personal property taxes, state1.-or federal -income taxes, sales" tax, license'tags, etc. do-not qualify a.voter for this election. A-. partnership business carried on in-Ada which''lias'paid'taxes gives, voting -part ners. Husbands and wives joint owners of a homestead may vote: Voting- .'will be1 at traditional precinct polling places throughout the Placid Amish Accept As Protest INDEPENDENCE, Iowa (API- Eight bearded Amish men went to jail here Saturday in protest against what they said was state interference with the operation of their private schools. In Justice of the Peace Court they refused to pay fines of on misdemeanor charges of fail- ing to hire certified' teachers for their two schools in this northeast Iowa community. For the simple farm life of their religious sect, the Amish contend- ed that their own teachers with only an eighth-grade education are sufficient for their children.'They said they do not have enough money to pay for college-trained teachers required by state law. Two other Amish men had been One of them paid the fine. The other was in a hospital and could not appear. Three-day .jail 'sentences were imposed by Justice of. the Peace Joe Koeppel for the includ- .ing'one of., their number, Dan Bontrager, who acted as.spokes- man. Bontrager argutU that his peo- ple were protected by constitution- al guarantees of the right to re- ligious freedom and right of peti- tion. Chris Rober, John Nisley, Andrew Kaufman, Dan Stqtzman, Empn MulletC Joe Bontrager and Willie Bontrager, dressed in the dark garb typical of their sect, walked, quietly out of-the court- room and upstairs to .the jail. Buchanan County attorney Wil- liam O'Connell represented the state. .He said the Amish have a right to maintain a parochial school but .must comply with state standards. The Amish were warned in Sep- tember they were violating the state law in operating two.schools 'in'a.rural section of North Bu- chanan County. The 37 pupils- are taught arithmetic, reading, writ- ing, spelling, health, geography and history. ,For refusal to hire certified teachers the country school super- intendent has asked for a district court injunction to dose the schools.' KEY, WEST, Fla. na radio said Saturday night So- viet First .Deputy Premier Anas- tan I. Mikoyan would bid farewell to people'Sunday. Salvation Army, Lions Begin Gathering Toys Christmas season has begun with The Salvation Army, too. Recognizing that it takes more than a festive dinner to make a Christmas, The Salvation Army here has for years gathered good and broken toys and dolls, rstor- ed them, and gladdened as many little hungry hearts as mouths. Santa Claus Will Be In Ada Monday '.That's the sound of that well- dressed individual from the North Pole as he prepares to swing into Ada for a little pre-Christmas visit. Santa Claus, taking time out from his activities up at Toyland is going to appear in this-city at 7 p. m. Monday, to' signal the lighting.of the downtown Christ- mas decorations. He's appearing through ar- rangements made: by .the Ada Chamber of .the Jay- cees and Retail Merchants. The jolly old guy ..will visit with, young- sters and, as always, and candy for all; He has other appearances slat- ed in the area December' 13 .at Roff, December 14-at ;Stratfordj- December at .'Stonewall and: December 18 at Allen.-... Santa sent mail room will-be in good! hands while he's.swinging through.Lattle Dixie so no. boys-and.-girls heed'worry" about important: g ting to him because he's away from home. V OSU Lamb Takes Top U.S. Prize The Ada Lions Club cooperates in the job of collecting toys.- In the past, a citywide campaign has been the manner of getting them. This -year it's different.' The Lions- have -erected big collection boxes! They will.'be located different- places. At-least of the super markets .-will have them outside. t Some will be'located .alongside the Salvation Army .Christmas sidewalk-booths. The toy shop, 330 West Twelfth. There'the'repairs are made. Bright paint replaces weathered surfaces. And'old toy's can be left at the shop if a- donor would prefer. The.' Woman's Auxiliary. .will again this..year 'collect and dress dolls for the city's little girls; This has become one of and most dependable of the Christmas efforts.. Captain R...M. Miller1 explains that .the toys-will', be 'given to.par- ents for 'the1 children.': :The, par- ents' preference and -advice..; will be-sought. The entire effort-depends, i how- ever, on 'the. generosity-of. the'peo- ple 'in 'giving-toys! .In'.order, to. have time to-do1 good repair. Job, .the toys donated early.. v Of courseY.'Capt.-' Miller, explain- .ed, this year.-. 1 Diplomats Say Troops Are Leaving WASHINGTON (AP) An extensive dismantling of nonnuclear Soviet military bases in Cuba is'now ex- pected by U.S. officials to follow Soviet Premier Khrushchev's .withdrawal of weapons with nuclear capa- bility. Russian diplomats are reported to have told U.S. representatives in recent days that several.thou- sand more Soviet troops' will be removed from the Caribbean is- land, Russia, it js believed, may also disarm and abandon 24 surface- to-air missile sites which, could of- fer formidable opposition to U.S. reconnaissance planes flying pa- trols over Prime Minister Fidel Castro's land. But evidently be- cause Russians man the antiair- craft installations they have not been used against. American planes in the last 10 days despite angry, and explicit warnings by Castro that surveillance flights be fired on. Back To Normal Both the Uhited.States and Rus- sia, Washington authorities' say, "are now-trying-to.restpre theirre- lations to more: precrisis This' may ef- ;forts..by both' powers, Security Council this.week.to. take the .waning crisis-'off .-the '.docket; Kennedy' and tary of State-Dean is un: derstood, would be w31ing--to in- form the.Security Council that the United States has a-policy ot non- invasion toward Cuba under pres- ent conditions but will: continue strict watch over the island.in'the absence 'of international tion arrangements, which Castro' has blocked. He Backed Down Khrushchev pulled out big nucle- ar missiles from Cuba and agreed to permit U.S. warships to .look over the deckloads of missile-car' -CHICAGO (AP) Two univer- sities and a father and son team T -r, rymg Soviet ships. Last Tuesday shared major awards Saturday at- hfi p6romised to.take out heed; Aircraft machinists' union j.wtiait. the: coin- .contract and iirged eiter acceptance or.'-an flection on the .'offer .among -union and .non- union members, alike. the International Live Stock Ex- position. The grand champion wether a 105 pound' Hampshire named ''Oklahoma, was shown'by. Oklahoma- State Uni- grand 'of -three wether lambs, also was- exhibited .by.Michigan-State Mich. and, his son, Jack, 31, of 'Ida Grove; .Iowa, showed. 15 sleek aberde'en angus steers that were adjudged- the grand champion carlot of position. 1 Oklahoma- State's Twinning weth- er lambs were ;shown-in theTing by- Alexander McKerizie', who has atnthe, school. for 34 years. -In grand .champion also breed- champion- ship'in Dorset, sheep. McKenzie showed grand champion- show'.two'years ago. and'has won at'least'four .breed "championships for ,-the OHahom'a'4'school, cent .'years ,at :In shrep: competition at- the State', granoV. champion; pen and State; the first ,a southdown.'" :The carlot 'cattle'was the; "eighth' since'.'-1942 for'Karl-'and arid'.his team a.team: Thenvtfirst .victory J-.'i, __ promised IL28 jet: bombers under a similar compromise inspection system. White House, and Pentagon planners .are .now looking into possibilitiesJor some different approach'to. the inspec- tion problem. Castro blocked Khrushchev's promise of U.N. in- spection. One has been; talked about is the formation Caribbean, or some similar, zone free.of nuclear offensive weapons, which would be brought .under'.a '.local system of international inspection. We're Satisfied U.S. officials profess to be satis; 'fied that Khrushchev has removed or will remove the weapons speci- fied the big missiles and the bombers. They do not know-wbat he might have sneaked into.Cuba that aerial-surveillance, would nev- er'discover what might1 be hidden in .the'-country's-, many caves. .Thus; -.they .pressure for. inspection within, the'1, country must be .continued'-. This pressure now will .be .brought to 'bear .more on -Cuba than on :Russia. since U.S.-Soviet te'nsions.are easing off; long story, short, .like: having the boss, (Copr. Gen. Fea. S" WRECKED The remains of the R.-L..Magar involved accident three miles west towed from the highway. Two members of the Magar famiry injured in Staff Seeks Monitors GENEVA. High Western diplomats. night des- cribed.' a -suggested system of to- bot seismic-stations to monitor a huclear..'weapons .'test- ban as ex- tremely' complicated -and expen: sive'and apparently not'-even fool- proof. i. They were referring to the black box idea, .a proposed .worldwide belief instruments.1- Both the -United -'States arid Brit- ain have -said they to discuss '-the' first ''raised in the' London PugwasH Conference in September and picked -up by Soviet 'officials in Gene- va 'and, New Yorlo1 Western .diplomats expect the Russians to submit a detailed pro: pbsal after the' reopening of the 17-nation! disarmament conference Monday. Western officials said American and .'British, scientists. -have found many .flaws, in. the black-box idea; which the -Russians; contend could eliminate the -need' tional 'on-site which the two Western. 'powers- and- could solved toe deadlock' over how. the' ..proposed natiohally-manned-stations should :-As far, that -the -sealed seismic recorders, each" -weighing 'lup'-': to '400 .wdul'd the, the ,'V jhey.Vwquid would be to the' -proposed-; 'Vienna headquarters-, of theilnterna tional1 Test Ban Treaty ----Commission.' There technician's .would jscan the. tapes-for' possible! recordings indi- cating ..a clandestine, nuclear ex- plosion. Only a 'official would-be allowed, 'to break the' seals. j Jhe sources said Western scien- tists maintain 'a test :ban could almost- and al- (Contlnutd on Piflt Two) Oklahoma City Kills Mrs. An Ada woman was killed and- Her husband injured in an automo- bile accident in Oklahoma City Friday. Fif-. teenth, died in an City hospital-about.S.p. m: Friday.after the car-in'-which a pa's-1 senger. collided with another ve- hicle. Snowstorm Sweeps Over Northeast By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A small, left a trail' of snow from Wisconsin to New England 'and' blew itself' out Saturday: ..Another storm was building, up in the Gulf of Alaska- and already was. battering the .northern Pacific. -with gale force'winds! the na-: tion Clear.: skies'''.were' the: rule: over wide .areas.-.'.' .'V- .The stornVjiv from. in of; Upstate New York'- A 'few snow hi the ..northern-; mountains1 Temperatures' rangedI-'from, the Iowir80s in the. 'and ;west- .ward through tbeJGreatjLakes re- gion.--' Ample'sunshine frpnrthe.'Great Lakes westward Mo-' pulled, temperatures .into- theCsOsVi.after, chilly, morning readings ;below freezing..Readings in the 30s in 'the northern Rockies 'and in along Pacific .'-'.'v The accident occurred at the in- tersection of Sixty-third and May in Oklahoma-City, at m.-Fri- day. Her husband, Jess a passenger in the car; was reported to have sustained-two broken ribs in the accident..He is hospitalized in' Oklahoma '.City1 and unable .to attend the funeral. The car was -driven by .Mrs. Hale's Floyd Oklahoma' City! Becky Fur- long, 12, Mrs. .Earl's" daughter, was -passenger in the. car. No information-as1 to'th'eir-'ih-1 juries, iTany, was available" here Saturday., The Hales 'were 'in Oklahoma City "for a'Thanksgiving visit with Mr: and' and another daughter, 'Mr. and Mrs. 'Bill1 Craw- ford. The accident victim..'Was-torn: August 16, 1890, in Winnsboro.i Texas'." R.! 'first husband-died epidemic', of- 'World'.War'-'L .'.Ada. about 1921 an'd worked as-cashier'for t-E: for five -years.' married one.-, of.; Ada'.s; .best knownV He for on- ly about- aftef r man's pepartment-'Store.-' She. leaves; -three .daughters: Mrs. -Bill'', Oklahoma City; Mrs. Floyd Earls; Oklaho- ma-'' .Mrs.' Dallas! ,There'are four grandchilf dren-.ahd five greatrgrandchildreh: for' Mrs. ,Hale" -will '-.I' the Chapel Home, ,Dr: -'.Hanse.v-.iiastor -'of '-the First .Baptist ChurcHl. officiating, :.with'.burial Cemetery; Badly Hurt In Smash up Two' members of a Pontotoe County'family, were seriously inr jured Saturday; evening in.a.grind- ing. car-truck: collision at the rain- slick intersection N of: State HighT three miles west of Ada." In serious'condition at the Val- ley View Hospital _were'Mrs. Betty Magar, arid 'her son, -Both received multiple injuries: to'the-bead and. chest. 'They were passengers in a car driven-by Ray L. Magar, 31. Mrsl Magar's'-'husband-. Another -pas- senger was a daughter, Mr: Magar and daughter were apparently seriously injured in .the'crash; but'were held over- night', for treatment and obser- 'vation? '.'.The accident.'occurred-at. p.--m! ,-in -a-light idrizzle. -.The Ma: 'gar. .smashed beyond recognition.-' An'. ambulance .-was. dispatched to the' scene1 where the four mem- bers'-of-'-'the .Magar- family-were picked', up "and rushed to the hos- pital' -The. truck, was driven by- Leon E. Sedder, Kan. Sedder.apparently received only Sedder-was proceeding'west on Hqldenvjlle 'to picte'up a- load .'of .going SH .19.-. _..- V The.impact spun the Magar czr around on .the, while the. truck slid-jsome 50 feeti past the and- nosed into the west'ditch.., after, the "accident; bystander's created! hazard, bothi 'and passing WASHINGTON (AP) General Dynamics Corp was picked by.tKe first test planes in what will, be- come a '.multibillion gram for sign fighter aircraft the'-, Air.' Forcearid Navy. The Defense Department said this "will surpass any fighter air- craft program' since. World War II in both numbers'and dollars." Dynamics 'No' specific cost were but unofficial-guesses'; were that !upward of -.billion ..could go 'into production-, of well over with Grunv Corp. '.first1 to" 2% years. next Saturday's1 award.was.Ior, deyel- opment'vand building "of' the test planes; and' not.! for ..production. That.will'. -mentJprogram..haMeached .vanced. point. 'The contest for'.the development contract Vthe.'jhardest' fought: "in; nar.-' rowed down coriipanies to.two of tiie titans-of .the.': .Dynamics and The Defense, Department chose General' Dynamics, statement said, company's-pro- posal "offered tlie best chance, of developing an airplane that would 'be '.botii acceptable ;and. compatible'Jwith ;the, ert'.S.vMcNamara-wants jet- fighter-plane l that; 'with' some" re: differences in jize U.S, and'weight arid with the ability, to. change configuration, .of. ;its fly Air. Force, 'Navy or'Marine, missions.; General is 'to -design .'a plane; at hour top.'-speed and 'at''supersonic', i Canl and short, .rough airfields, in. forward battle; areas or be launched.-and recovered by aircraft'carriers. >3 fly use. of'aerial, gets !'on: or'veriemy. lieves.that by .coming: up basic design for the'-.tacticalsfight- about as .compared with the cost, of, de- vieldpmgiseparafe. designs-'for. te The plane will! have Its .radar. equipment; .-.weapons system. than-just a pi: investigated: OKLAHOMA-Mostly cloudy, scattered: light central and eastern portions: ending late low 40 northwest to 5S southeast: Ugh Sunday 60 north' to 73 south. High, temperature in Ada .urday, 60, Friday niglitvlowi o'fj at, .5 58. :Rainfall dur- ing ending at .M inch.-   

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