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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 23, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Joe Zilch notices there was 32 pound turkey on the Kennedy table -f Thanksgiving. He Mississippians Surprise Tigers, See Sports Page H Youths Head For Meet, See Page Twelve 59TH YEAR NO. 218 JFK Turns Attention To Crisis Budget Director Gets Call For Round Of Talks HYANNIS PORT, Mass. (AP) President Kennedy swung his attention back to the abating Cuban crisis to- day after taking a holiday, respite around -a dinner table laden with a 32-pound turkey. Kennedy also was getting down to dollars-and-dlmes concentration on the budget he will be sending to Con- gress early next year. The President asked Budget Di- rector David Bell to fly up from Washington for a conference. And he asked the executive committee of the National Secur- ity Council to fly up session to review the Cuban situation. Several In Group The committee includes Secre- tary of State Dean Rusk and Un- dersecretary George Ball; Secre- tary of Defense Robert S. McNa- mara and Deputy Secretary Ros- well L. Gilpatric; Adlai E; Stev- enson, U.S.- Ambassador to the United Nations; Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; John .J. McCloy, chairman of the U.S. Cuban Crisis Coordinating Committee at the U.N., and McGeorge presi- dential assistant fdr national se- curity affairs. Kennedy was able to report to the American people at a news conference Tuesday that grave problems still remained but the dangers imbedded in the -Cuban crisis had diminished. and there was much to be-.thankful for. at this Thanksgiving season. As they dp every lots of Kennedys... .adults.- .de- scended on.the family compound for Thanksgiving Pay. .The youngsters -were fed early at the home of Atty. Gen. and Mrs. Robert F. Kennedy. And then Thursday night sons and daughters and in-laws, the Presi- dent and First Lady'among them, sat down to a turkey.dinner at the large, -gabled, white-frame home of the President's: parents, Mr. and Mrs! Joseph P. Kennedy. The elder Mr. Kennedy suffered a severe stroke nearly a year ago. And the family could be thankful that at least he was able to "be out on the front porch in a wheel chair to welcome the President on his arrival from Washington Wednesday night. Rainy Day Thanksgiving Day was dark and rainy on-the Cape. Even the har- dy Kennedys considered it a little too dreary to try touch football or skating at the ice rink. These have been family sports on pre- vious holidays here. It wasn't a day of complete re- laxation for the President. He got in some paper work and gave as- sorted other people'something to be thankful for. Matthew J.-Connelly, appoint- ments secretary to former Presi- dent Harry S. Truman, received a full pardon. He was convicted and imprisoned on charges of con- spiring to defraud the govern- ment, to commit per- jury and to violate the internal revenue laws. The pardon came two years after Connelly was pa- roled after serving six months of a two-year sentence. Happy Man In New-York, Connelly happily received the news. "In our history, there have been many injustices .imposed on peo- ple of good he said. "lam happy today that one of them has been brought into true perspec- tive." Connelly is now in the public re- lations business in New York. Connelly was sentenced along T. Lamar Caudle, former head of the Justice Department's tax division, on charges of trying to block the income prose; cution of Irving Scans, a St. Louis; Mo., manufacturer.. At Wadesborb, N.C., Caudle ex- pressed delight don and said he had an applica- tion to apply for'a. pardon but. had not yet filled it }was paroled after serving six months of a two-year sentence., Democrat Robert'M. Morgen- thau, who quit attorney! for the.Southern New for governor of 'New York- and lost, back; courtesy of. "ap- pointment from the.President. The U.S.' Senate .-must approve" the-- ap- (Continutd on Put Two) ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 23 1962 14 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY As Red Chinese Begin Cease- Nehru Claims Long War Is VENISON COMING This buck ii ont of the many bagged by hunters in thf Allen during first two d.y. of th. Th. youthful hunt.r with the nfla adm.ring look isn't lucky hunt.r, though.'" Ht's juit admiring this future trophy. (NEWS Staff Photo) Deer Hunters Bag 24 Bucks In Two Days lir By BOB HEATON Hunters in the Allen area 'bag- bed- 24 -deer during-the.'first''two days of open season. Eighteen shot opening' day, three, more thaji on openhig day last year. The largest buck reported at the Allen :check 'and weighing station was a 150 pounder, shot by Bob Hightower, Gerty. A 149 was by Mickey Ada. Both tro- phies -were, hog dressed when weighed.' Gordon Brown, Oklahoma City, shot an eleven point, 135'pound. -buck on-the-Ned -Biffle-ranch, south of Allen. This one almost escaped.- When hit, the deer plunged into the brush. 'It ..caromed .up a rocky -creek" bed, and ran into another hunter, who fired at.it again. .The buck reversed direction Argentina Claims Plot To Bar Vote Is Smashed BUENOS AIRES, Argentina government says 'it has smashed'a-plot'by an-army faction of upset President Jose Maria Guido and prevent elections next June.' .The -government; warned .that supporter's of -dictator, .Juan D. planned'to prevent the elections................. Security- 'eight alleged plotters said were likely. Those were to far 'a comeback by Peronists un- der'Guide's .plan'to .hold, elections Juhe-16 and.restore-constitution al -Retired ..'army Benjamin who'led .an'unsuccess- fulplot -against Pero'n -in :1951, was named-, as the leader of-the 'al- leged plan. He is reported to favor othe ouster' of "Guido aad installation of a military strongman.. Guido was installed; last March after'' a' military coup" overthrew President Arturo Frondizi. The. government did. Jiot .reveal how it. had "learned .of election-plot -Interior. Undersecretary i'Mari- aho Grondona said "two sectors in -that elections should not'be guerrillas (anti-Peronists) and Peron. They are'both parasites of national hate among Argentines." overthrown in 1955, is living in'Madrid, Spain. His supporters have been strug- gling to regain power. The .coup that installed Guido was-precipitated by a Peronist re- surgence in the March elections in which' Peronists won 9 of .22 gvernorships and 47 of 192 seats in the House of Deputies. .Interior Minister Rodolfo Mar- .tinez .said Thursday Peronists would be allowed to participate in the June elections if they cam- paign within the framework of the law. Elections are to be held for president, vice: president, both houses of Cngress and prvinclal and municipal ffices. Those-elected are to be installed Oct. 12 the situation mits" at that'time, Martinez-.said. The alleged antielectibn plotters rounded itip in addition to Menep- dez were: .Two.sons of miilo .Menendcz and Lt." jamin Desider- io Fernandez Buenos-'Ai: res province: in the pst-Peron revolutionary. govern- Col. Gustavo Eppens; re- tired :.'CoI. 'Manuel .'Raivundezi 'un- dersecreiary of war .under.'Fron- Col. Carlos Zavalla, and Jorge a "civilian. and re-encountered' Brown. An- other shot was 'fired. The ani- mal' then -disappeared. Brown and a-fellow hunter .spent'an- Tiour searching -for'- the elusive buck. When they found it, the animal was In all the eleven-pointer had covered nearly half a mile of territory. Brown" bullet hit the buck just behind the ribs, one had grazed its a third pierced a fore- leg. It was the largest of five deer shot on the Biffle ranch on open- ing day. Ruben Huffstatlar, Allen, was first to score oh'the Biffle ranch. He parked his-car and started toward his -bagged-a seven point buck 'less than. 100 yards later. Bard Todd, Ada, also hunting on the': Biffle' ranch, counted nine -'deer-' around "-his stand before-daylight. v "I couldn't see. which ones were Todd had to wait for light enough to see their' antlers." .The light was twenty minutes in. coming. A long twenty min- .utes for Todd. 'Hunting appears.to be a little this year than last. are being tagged. Whether: this is 'due to" more hunters or more deer is hard to say. tt, The vast bulfcsof the-kills, in this were re- ported in a south and 'east of Allen on or Bif- and Hamilton -Ranches: .The season will continue Sunday. Missionaries Go Back Into North India government ad- vice, three' American' mis- sionaries" have: set-out to- ward the uneasy Red'Chi- nese cease-fire line in north- eastern India to return to then-hospital, the U.S. cori- sulate, Reluctant.tb .leave'their patients at the Baptist'Christian, Hospital ,n Tezpuri the missionaries set out across the Brahmaputra River :rom Gauhai on a 90-niile' 'trek, gambling that the Red Chinese cease-fire will hold. The Indian government has warned civilians in Tezp'ur to leave. The consulate identified the missionaries'as Donald Loss and Joseph both physi- cians; and Warren hospital administrator. -No.'home towns were listed. Thirty-one.'American evacuees, mostly missionary-families, al- ready have been brought to Cal- cutta by the. Indian air force.; A convoy of five autos carrying: 18 persons -is now reported en' route, the .consulate said, and arid.50 persons are in-Ga'uhati, awaiting transportation south. The consulate estimates that 150 Americans, were ;ih Assam; mostly, south" of the river.--None reaching Calcutta reported .seeing anyfrghEngTESrconcefn'-'was ex- pressed for nicians still BERLIN (API-Chancellor Kon- rad Adenauer says it would be stupid :ior the West to let down its' 'guard- .now.- just .because ..So- viet Premier :Khrushchey backed down- rin. Cuba; i- -...Warning.'.'that. there, is "no-real proof of change of Adenauer in-, a '..speech' Thursday night, 'also .said West German Iroops in the. front line :.to .Berh'n'.V.if the So- viet; Union attempts- to -.use1 -force to settle the dispute over 'this divided, His .words were widly. cheered sbmeMO.pOOvof Adenauer's Christian Democrats packing Deutschland Hall, a big West Ber- lin indoor, arena, Adenauer's remarks on-the use of West German troops for the de-' fense of the' isolated city seemed to be directed primarily to the South African Police Arrest 300 Negroes PAARL, South Africa (APJ.-Po- lice-raided Paad's African settle- ment at dawn today and rounded up 300 Africans suspected of tak- in art in Thursda's race riot illed. Police, 'called the raid ,-an at- tempt to smash a dangerous, Afri- can underground movement in t usually sleepy Cape Province wine Tension ran high but police said they have the situation under con- A young while-schoolgirl'and "a rugby player were hacked to death and' at least five were', killed by police gunfire -in the outburst. Africans- wounded .in- fight- ing were held .under guard.in -hos- Police, sweeping into-the Afri- can settlement in riot -trucks, said .they seized scores; of clubs, iron bars and other-weap- ons, The: racial violence came at an embarrassing -time ;for, 'Spufli ca's all-white government, which- is under new attack in the .United Nations for poli- cies. Adenauer Warns West Not To Drop Guard On Soviets There has -been {fear that the West'. Germans' '.would 'leave the Western; Allies completely alone to deal with'an attack Adenauer, who came to. Berlin for 'a meeting of- his party's na- tional committee, appeared to'be in.a.less rosy frame-of mind than some -British- and American lead- ers when :guard..- Some leaders..are. reported feeling-'thafpressures on Khrushchev; followingrthe'Cuban ceptable solutions of some '.old war.-issues, particularly nuclear tests. Adenauer was -o p ti mi-st i c enough, however, to predict'a lull in'the Berlin dispute for the'time being.- If the Soviet moved against Ber- lin, 'he they 'could meet "The 'same firm 'and determined resistance 'as in Cuba.'' in- Cuba, he said, "Khrushchev- was smart enough -to withdraw Soviet-arms" when he- faced a. determined United The he 'said, didn't like the Red Chinese onslaught in In- at home also were tying down the Kremlin, Adenauer told his audience: .The 86-year-old government leader ran into .some :heckling when turned 'to domestic is- sues, .the _ affair con- cerning 'the 'weekly.news ma'ga1 zine Der.Spiegel. necessary.'the government 'crisis that. blew; up over the, arrest :'of Spiegel publisher Rudolf Augstein and 'his. editors on.sus- There'were booes and whistles when ,Adenauer: .-declared there was complete: press Germany. Young. Christian Demo-- crats ejected-at-least'five. of .the hecklers. -Adenauer ..followers clashed -on 'hall-with demonstra- tors ca'rrying banners Demanding new elections in'West Germany and -Adenauer's -resignation.- Ad- enauer supporters tore down the 'banners. Spaceman Say Problems isran 'animal that 'can thousand'people for-a'ride at the. .same time. (Cbpr. Gen. Fea. Corp.) B-'SKELTON; HOUSTON, Texi nauts'Leroy" Jr. and Alan B. Shepard Jr..said.to- day .practically' all ..of -Project Mercury's problems have been overcome. Cooper is on schedule to make the' nation's longest.space 18 orbits of the earth in ;24 hours February or.March.- "We have pretty weU'rattied all of.the skeletons out of the Shepard said as the two were in- terviewed at the National Aero- nautics and Space Administration Manned Spacecraft Center here. "There are problems, of course, but all of 'the major .ones have pretty -well been 'Cooper said. the first -American spaceman, is the backup pilot for Cooper's flight. Cooper said-he is-delighted with his selection and said he., was not discouraged by his lengthy .wait in drawing the" assignment. Cooper origi nalseven'astronauts to be'-select- a, space-.flight. -A--heart flutter-' eliminated Maj. Project Mercury's flight Shepard said.they prbb'ably'-' intensive training.-'for-, the. flight ;at Cape or early ,-February; They said no'radical: changes haye'-.b'eeii, made., in- the '-Mercury capsule-since "Shepard. .made his Atiantic1.- from Cape Canaveral OKLAHOMA 'CITY C. W. Chuck Bartles-" ville, was elected, minority'floor leader today biggest "Re- publican House! delegation in 30 years caucuse'd "Capitol.: OKLAHOMA CITY J. Howard Edmondspn joined today'in .asking the federal court order that 'the constitutional reapporUonment petition w a s adopted Npvl and" anVorder "of the" reapportionment commission ELLICpTT CITY, Md; A Lines plane crashec and bunied "today'; In a wooded area Homestead, .about 10'miles -west of State Police said there were 14 passengers and four .'crewmen plane .and reports from.; the, scene Indicated there were no survivors.; 1 KEY yana .radio said' today Cuba's'do mesflc'arid TnteAiatlonal airplane Saturday Ada, Elk City Police 3 .Three youths are being held Jn Ada and Elk City as.they stand; accused. of- burglarizing their own club ,and stealing from local.residents._ Charges .against; them are according to lo-: cal authorities. Ada' police detective.. James Branom said .Friday-he has filed complaints against ...three .-boys, 15 and 16, 'accusing them of burglary-and.; car: theft. One. is being held' in. Pontotoc County jail. The .-other. two are under, arrest-at Elk City; but. will be-returned to Ada. Branom.said the three signed statements ad-, milling burglary and.car theft. The burglary.'occurred .last Mon- day night, at'the Ada Boys' Club on East'Tenth; Monday the.building was entered-by -smashing a window, on the. west side-.and-kicking-in the door .to .the director's-office: Tom- my Daniels, director of'.the said -in.cash was missing: The stolen cars belong to' Earl Parker, McDonald ...McDonald's first but the youths, said they.wrecke< the-vehicle on North'.Nancy Stree when..they'reached a.deadend ant plowed; .railroad.embank- ment. ,'They ;admittecl taking the Park- er car, a few minutes later anc driving .''north1 from -Ada. .wrecked 'the about one mile south of Bowlegs..; .In boys' said they hitchhiked1 from Bowlegs to Se'minole where they .caught a bus to Oklahoma; City-and thence to Elk: City.-One of .the-boys had lived-near Elk.City prior ing-to Ada." 'i Branom said Elk City police ar- the youths.for a-car theft there. The -Ada .detective said-he .has signed.- complaints charging the boys with, burglary -.and car, theft. Because of their least two of them will be remanded to juve- nile.cburt. Toll Over Thanksgiving By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Traffic-.. 132 Fires-..- 16 Miscellaneous 1? '227 'The'1 tally of Thanksgiving holi- day deaths moved, steadily higher. today, paced by a rash' of multiple fatalities'-.in; traffic accidents: '.Highway deaths since the count began' ;at 6 Wednesda'y'.'totaled. .192 isomp'arejd to 168 for: a' comparable1' period last -year.. Fires; 16' persons and There 'were-numerqus'.'reports of accidents' in; which fliree, four 'a'n'd- when their car' smashed into a Union Pacific freight train .at a crossing1 -in 'the outskirts '-of Omaha. The National Safety did not .make an estimate-of the traf fie death'toll for .Thanks'givingxpr for1' the ;extended from ,6 p.m. Wednesday TJntilvroid night- Sunday1.'it said the traffic- o'h the: holiday is' no'Pheayy is'on other "major '.T :the: council "said tha 'deaths- -Sunday '.peribi at'tEis'tiine'of abbu .102 there' -were" two in 'persons" were fatally: four 'of pmaha fStudents-.were death's in (Cbntiri'uad-on (AP) banned the sale of preludin and other drugs" suspected causing" 'deformities in unborn'" babies in the wake of: a British investigation into birth-deforining .pills. The issue of ;the: British Medical" .two women .who; had; takeif jreluijin; gave xbirth---to t, defprmeflsbabtes.' it .could.haye.Tbeen spokesman British" Col- lege oFGeaeraV Practitioners said mide 'are suspected causing baby deformities. He.' said drug were notified .-about-' the" college's the-drugs, pending: additional'evi- .is.- a.1. pill ,'fpr-vslimihing down preg- lant JK The Amerlcah'THMical tion, reiterated advice to expect- ant mothers to take-only. prescribed fdrugs" during tKfe'e. months' of- i-Ari' {Amencan' since the United' :Geigy v -W anVsaid" eyi-: dencci preludin "t. was Jrespon-.. marketed is "taken orally to suppress the .Lyman-'said. Thc'Italian Health ban Thursday.ifrind -.-phenil-' Preludinr' was -.i- -y.-..-'. -JVOheVor twb'.drugs' that are" require further: "This may be coincidence, but until -we have more. information! we.would rather. 'fc was'- med- j He isaid college :had studying congenital deformities: drugsjarevcbnnectediwithssbnie 'information'-.'regarding  'r< have'J-resulted andjl Invaders Stay In Ladakh NEW DELHI, India (AP) The Indian army rushed resh troops to the Himalay- s today as- the nation wait- d out the tense'nine'-day eripd of a cease-fire before led .China begins it promis- d'military pullback. be- ieved .consolidating, and. rer inforcing the-startling gains- 'in 'the rugged mountain border .areas in 2 days of rundeclared war Before they .proclaimed and rat into effect t: Tacitly accepting ndian tropps.were reported under ecret orders' to' hold .their fire nless fired.-upon. ..But' Prime Minister Nehru aking; a pro- wsals for ending- the .conflict -Red China, said .die would begin pulling her troops back on Dec. i. Then But what..would happen then was far from'clear. Peking's pror losal was regarded as an iltimatum- whiclt-would .force In- dia lo. 'yield the Ladakh Plateau on the western end of hei- in return .for ;regaining most of areas .in. .-Adopting- ahead em'ergency' measures -to .put--its': forces, into a better- suffering (smashing-jblowsi-v.' of allongh'ard speech since' no notice .of' Pekirig's "Be prepared 'for drawn out -war mined le young Red Cross -workers.'-.; '..'He" -called 'On.-.Indians for a sense of sacrifice to make the country great and.-to defend hard- won freedom. Word, here; -that; the .Chinese may be. Consolidating; their posi- tions awaiting the outcome of the cease-fire may have- been based on aerial reconnaissance., 1 So far there; has been no aerial fighting, bombing or strafing by either side., Provocations But a Red Chinese.- broadcast charged- two, Indian "plans -made provocative intrusions .over Chi- lese positions along.the border h.the Lake Spanggua sector, of Ladakh; In luie 'with ;the cease-fire, Peking, said; Chinese troop's. did not open fire' on: the .planes.; The Chinese said the cease-fire would be followed by 'withdrawal to approximately the line dia, says is. the border in; .the to what .Chiha'.says has been-its -contol in .the Lost Higtrjofficials as.' well as loudly1 outspoken members of'Par- were determined -not .to accept this as a permanent rangement .because'it would .leave miles of Ladakh' Since: the: border public .in: repeat- edly that meant thfclb'ss-bfTeastern Ladakh. r said may take -what: benefits it- can- fromj'.the have to fight again. Renewed-- would begin .with stronger foreign support than has come-so (Continued on Two) OKLAHOMA Partly, cloudy tonight; 'Cooler extreme, nortk cloudy :.Sajurday_occa- and; cooler. CCD- .tral-Md tooljht. 94 a to MuUk'   

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