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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: November 18, 1962 - Page 1

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Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - November 18, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             JOHN FLEET PAUL DENNY DUANE RATLIFF TAD MACKENZIE WALTER ROWi ACT. Presents "Born Yesterday" Tonight PLEASED DIRECTOR A.C.T. director Wriy really with for "Born in tmotion for of htr icton. Tht driving fore, of th, local th.atrt, Mr.. Wray is ing htr fifth waton with A.C.T. Th. group Born tonight for th, firit It kicks off th. 1962-63 stason for Adans. At upp.r right a few of.th. play's in posts. (NEWS Staff By ERNEST THOMPSON "Born a play that turns an angry, sermon' into an amusing evening, :opens the. Ada Community Theatre's-1962-63 sea- son tonight at the Ada Junior High School' Auditorium, Curtain time is ,8 The Garson Kaniri comedy deals with an ugly customer a big-time racketeer. For roughneck Harry Brock, who has his paws 'on most of the nation's junk nothing talks but money and nothing what- ever-.talks back.--: .But in slugging Harry, -portray- ed for the A.C.T. by John; Fleet, Playwright Kanin has'saved his fists 'and relied on his funnybone. His menacing. robber 'baron is also a slob and eventually a sucker. "Born Yesterday" brings Brockj to where he -.has] bought'a senator; to try-to grab off junk i yards- all-, over- the post- war world. He installs himself, .his...hench- men and his .dumb girl friend, Billie Dawn, in a fantastic a-day.lvptersuite.-.Since there are forays .into decides; had better, get educated. His' choice of' .is a crusading young writer on.The New Republic.: .From" there on, everything in the' play is pre- dictable but piquant. young woman (Linda Rob-j er'tson) defines peninsula as "that new medicine" when she .first ar- Tives in D. C., but soon is mouth- ing words such as'antisocial-and cartel: Her "mind conscience -and her-.arnorous inclinations shift, "She 'and -her tutor' get..the goods on Brock, then march'off to get married. "Bornv Yesterday." is strictly a show 7-pne.. much.: more- bounce than craftsmanship. The first act. with 'its-picture of the home life. of-, a baboon and his .delightful. starts -muscling in .on character, -and the.show has its-ups-and-downs.-But, things are kept-moving by; enough good gags and deft'direction by A.C.T.'s Jeanne Adams: Wray: Miss Robertson, a' queen, and 'native -of .Ada, is. a pleasant surprise with her slow takes, flat nasal twang and floozie walk: When- she sorts her 'cards in. a gin rummy game; Ada theatre buffs 'get one of the great, comedy moments ever presented .by the tough, vicious but somehow vcomic .Brock, and bria for what he lacks in menacing physi- cal, -makeupi.and.-comes.out not quitc'Paul Douglas, but certainly believable. Paul a real-life college is cast in the role of Brock's alcoholic attorney and yes man. He -was a latecomer' to 'the cast, but Adans: will bevsiirprised by his adroit-turn of phrase, as arid as: the Sahara and often' overlooked the general .clamor. ..Eugene' Hughes., his' A.C.T. debut in1 .the.irole' "angry young man" who.wants .to put an .end to. .political horse- trading .and up from poverty mugs who make...put '.in Hughes .'is .a .young college, pro- fessor in real .life .and carries off his part well. Walter Rowe; engineer at Ideal has oust the right: (Continued on Pig, Two) MY WORDI Eugtnt Hughts .is shocktd by Linda Reb- trtson's -suggestion that thtlr acqyaintanctship might something other than platonie. MFss! Robtrtson plays .th, Itad rolt of dumb) Billit Dawn in "Barn Ytsttrday." Hughes, colltgt prottssor, plays tht part of ,angry >oung inttlltctual, hirtd to givt tht girl "culturt." Curtain timtlfor.tht first ptrformanct.il.tonight' at -I.MNIWS Staff Atoka Slates Vote On Bonds, See Page Eight 59THYEARN0.214 Dump Mighty Mizzou; See Sports Page ADA, OKLAHOMA, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 34 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Series Of To Ada's Events Lead Election By GEORGE GURLEY Four separate .programs will be placed before the people on De- cember 4 in a special municipal bond election. The total sought on the four proj- ects is in general obliga- tion' bonds. Any registered, tax paying resident-of the city may Actually, city councilrncn have, for several months, been consider- ing several items too large for the city budget and were destined for under bond financing. Three recent events have galva- nized this concern into action. The first "nudge" came when the Public Works Acceleration Act was signed into law. Under its terms, the federal government will participate in certain desig- nated areas to the tune of 50 per cent on approved municipal proj- ects. Next, the state highway is cur- proved its last bond issue. One of V14W rently conducting an extensive these issues was for and traffic survey for this city. One of the areas it is investigating -is a new signal system to replace: the city's, outmoded traffic .control devices. Arid then, even more .recently, councilmen- learned.- that '..theima- jor north-south runway at Ada's Municipal Airport is in grave dan- ger. At the same time, they learn- ed they stood a good chance, to secure matching federal resurfacing of -the runway. With federal assistance, the city will be pushing several programs ahead at- bargain rates. If all grants are approved, and indica- tions -here are extremely favor- able the actual cost of the com- bined programs, is with the city actually spending 000. It was in 1959 when the city ap- was utilized for the improvement of. the municipal water, .system. Another in bonds was voted or improvements in Wintersmith 'ark 'and this -issue has since >een-retired. irm of R. J. Edwards, Oklahoma" City, .to assist in the election. A representative was at last Mon- day's- council' meeting.: He' commeritlsd that Ada -bonds always "enjoy 'a" ready cause of the city's favorable fi- nancial condition: And there is little doubt it is favorable. Currently, Ada has a net taxable evaluation of Indians Fall Back To Counterattack NEW DELHI, India (AP) In- J.NJJVY Aiiuia dian forces have given some launched their'. counterattack in ground to counterattacking Red Chinese around Walong, key de- .fense position on the northeast answer to an: artillery barrage in which the Indians fired! shells into 'Communist positions, around icnse POSILIUU un wc front in India's undeclared border. Walong.-early Friday.' war, the. Defense Ministry said- Saturday. India-'Was reported rushing re- inforcements aboard comman: deered civilian airliners. Red China pictured Indian with- drawals as a rout. A New China news agency broadcast heard. ;in Tokyo said Red Chinese troops ad- Walong'itself and Indian- troops fled southward. The broad-' cast claimed 'Indian troops were1 "smashed" late Friday afternoon when they were .unable to hold their lines under Chinese counter- attacks. OU Dads Pick Adan Dave Howe As President David 0. Howe, manager for Ideal Cement in Ada, Saturday morning was honored by being elected as the new president of the OU Dads Association. Tom- Garrett. The election was held Saturday morning in Holmberg Hall on the campusi Mr. and Mrs. Howe-have one son at the Jimmy., He i is a junior with, a major in en- gineering. Howe, who -is -also, vice-mayor for Ada, will: serve for year.. Give a man some facts and he draw, his Gen. own confusions. Corp.) The agency said- the Chinese The agency said Indian forces had launched what'it called fierce attacks on Communist positions near Jang andliuhketula, south of the Towang 300 miles .New China' news agency broadcast heard in Tokyo 'said the'Indians attacked, under cover of heavy sh'ellfire.' An Indian Defense Ministry spokesman gave a different ver- sion', saying the Chinese'attacked at.'Jang and were repulsed four times. The fighting around Walong ap- peared the more crucial., Indian commanders fear 'a Chinese breakthrough there could give the Communists easy' passage down into the-plains of upper Assam State, where India 'has its main oil 'installations. The Defense .Ministry spokes- man said fierce fighting .was in progress up to the time- the De- fense Ministry had; received its latest report Saturday morning The Chinese counterattack begar Thursday after Indian forces hac jnade attacks in-the 'area to'fceep the- Chinese -from ;consolidating positions. He said the Indian forces stil held Walong arid presumably'the airstrip south The. -village: Luhil .and: the'-fighting has on steep sides, online -the The into the Brahmaputra'River-'flowing Into the plains-'of Assam.' r The Defense -Ministry1 said .the Chinese attacked, considerably Superior He .made-no comment; on-Indian rein forcements said they --were .bemg-i'rushed'.up the Brahmaputra River Valley to Walong. Nixon Says He Won't Run Again LOS ANGELES (AP) Former Vice P r e s i d e n t Richard ,M. .in; :his .first public, losing: election 837. reserve accrual, 'the ity now has a net debt of 074. This is a ratio of bonded in- debtedness to net taxable evalu- ation of 16.3 per cent, a low and cxceUent ratio. Most cities of comparable size !o Ada have a debt ratio of 25 to 30. per cent and there are many who run as high as 45 per cent. If the bond issue passes, what will.it mean in added taxes to property owners. At the. maxi- mum levy, it will mean "approxi- mately an- additional per of evaluation. This amount will, of course, scale downward as the bonds are the figure wasiplaced deliberately on the high side since it is impossible to tell in advarice'atjwhat'interest rates bonds- will beosold.v But, -'.'in the past, Ada issues have enjoy- ed a favorable reception and ex- perts, point out that there no reason to think they, will .not con- tinue to do so with the city's ex- cellent record. The election will cover four items. Voters may endorse, or re- ject all or any.part of the pro- gram. Perhaps of primary interest, is the new' city'. hall. ,Th'e present building is. old. and... fraught with' problems. 'Councilmen; 'have long been concerned about it. The total cost -of the new struc- ture is programmed at This includes for. furnish- ings. Another will be spent in constructing a new service building for the water department on city property at Seventh; and (Continutd on paat he to.run again> for: public .of: fice. .In..telegrams Deceived :by several declared the.Califbrnia'race was "my last'campaign for public office." The defeated Republican candi date, in a Nov.; 7 news confer- ence, conceded defeat to Gov. Ed- mund G. Brown and indicated he was through -with public life. At one point he declared: "This is my last press conference." "As I begin a long-delayed va- cation, I want to: thank you for your recent editorials and the ob- jective news coverage of. my ac- tivities during, the 16'' years I have been in public life. "As I finish my last campaign for public shall always be grateful'for, opportunity :that has'been accorded of serv- ing'as a congressman, as a sen- ator and as vice president of the United States for eight -years.. Looking to the future, I hope that Ttiy "voice'can .help to' pre- serve, and extend the'kind'of-op- portunity for all Americans which it has been my privilgeg to enjoy. few disappointments have been my lot in pol- itics are as nothing compared to the mountain top experiences which it has been 'my' privilege to enjoy..' "There is no more striking ex- ample 'of this 'truth than the events, of..the .past does an attack by one .convic'tec weighed.on the scale against the thousands 'of: otic. Americans? "My parting advice to all those contemplating a.' political career is simply this: It is not whether that, whether we fight to the our .abilities for cause' in Soon On FBI Woold-Be Saboteurs NEW YORK (AP) The FBI cracked down Saturday on what it called a pro-Cas- tro Cuban sabotage conspir- acy against the United States. Agents arrested three persons, including one Cuban United Nations at- arid seized a small ar- senal of explosives.. Two other members of the Cu- ban mission to the United Na- tions, a husband and wife, were- named as conspirators and furn- ishers of the explosives but were not arrested because of diplo- matic immunity. The' U.S.; 'delegation to the United Nations'quickly asked for theuvrecall to Cuba, saying their .action's were a most flagrant abuse of the privilege of residence in this country. The government accused the three under arrest of conspiring to gather information on U.S. mili: tary installations and to destroy, national defense materials, preni- and utilities in New York: Furthe'r details were not given. Seized in.a morning raid on a Manhattan 'shop were six French delayed-action incendiary .bombs, a dozen detonators for them, three U.S: Army-style' fragmentation hand .grenades and a 45-caliber automatic pistol. i .those .arrested was. itbbert Santiesteban Casanova, a new. attache of the .Cuban U.N. mission .who flew here Oct. 3on a plane bringing Cuban President Osvaldp-Dprticos to attend a'U.Ni session. on Pifl, Two) Pretty Crummy: Typical .winter .weather dribbled into. Ada and over the rest of. the.state Friday night' -and, with the usual, snowstorms in the Pan- handle and generally nasty con- ditions elsewhere. Drizzling rain sifted over the local area, as the; cold front moved in, and stayed. Autumn foliage, fairly .to be described as gorgeous, took on. a bedrag- gled, air. -And a good part of it took'off from'.its parent trees; settled in ditches and .gutters. i. Motorists turned on. their fog lights and ..windshield' wipers, spoke- bitterly when -passing, trucks kicked' up spray. of dirty water'over their: wind-: shields, began, drifting into service stations and garages in search of anti-freeze for the radiator.- Ada weather observer W.- E.- Pitt reported- .20 inch of preT cipitation'tb 5'p.m. Saturday. .Meanwhile, Weather Bureau forecasters --spoke "gloomily- of more rain to come, mixed with snow; and-hopefully, of-a slight warming trend Driving conditions. were re- ported .hazardous- in .northwest Oklahoma 'Saturday. In the Ada- roads were pnly; .normally' slick from .the rain..; Snow.. moved into the- state night, two .the, .Panhandle .-by.-. dawn. Saturday and spreading- into. .western.-portions of the. state along with drizzling rain during the said the. snow was expected-to continue :through Saturday.night..; The Highway-Patrol reported a rash of accidents .in heavy traffic in the.-'Norman'area; "Ddmestic" Corps WASHINGTON (AP) Presi- deritiCennedy'appointed a Cabinet- level conimlttee-of seven'Saturday, it :would be a launch a' domestic -ilarto''thelPeace Corps-operating The--President :picked; his-broth- er; "Attyi'.GenV-Kbbeft'F.-Kennedy, -to The.'attorney gen- eral already'hasinade.a .prelimin- turned The.atto'rhey. general envisioned ;ca'ns'of aH'ages a "chance iwer the'President's challenge in his inaugural, address-toj they can :do for, ;their country: Robert Kennedy said: "We need to offer visible avenues for serv- ice to; these Robert Kennedy's report pro- posed that the, national service corps be open: to all persons-froro high school'.graduates'to''retired people; -with a one-year, term :'of voluntary: Peace Volunteers :would get enough livinjex- a small sunx in'addition atthe-end of.their the committee will consist of Sec- retary; of Labor, W.WiUard, Wirtz, OKLAHOMA CITY homa Repubh'can leaders 'were told 'Saturday, they' still .have! much work ahead.to.'bring-a real two-party political system to Okla-. that they must share the spoils of. thiiryearV.unprece- dented victory with who Governor-elect .the; iirst win'; the Oklabpnia'gsgoverhpKiioffice, told: teal ignore members of '.the ;bther party who helped-us is unwise and unthinkable." of Enid, tht state's -lone .Republican congress- said Oklahoma will not be a .two-party state "until we fill some of the -courthouses and have a working majority in'-.both -the House of'Representativei and the Senate." ifttiu. the igathered''" here to" chairman.- and, discuss Mrs: James ;Maddox 'off. Tulsa: was elected vice defeat- ing Mri-John Grten of Claremore 128 ,to lib on the.-.second .ballot. Four were eliminated-in the. first, vote on a successor to Mrs. nominated were Mrs..- Steve Will- sey Frank .and Mrs.- Pauline Mra.-- "nest Stated ;Forrest "the state but hopes Jan- 'BelinMn told ther party leaders n this will be. re- member.ed as the.best in our'his- tory. "Poorly- staffed and he -will, likely be remem- bered-'as "the only'Republican'ad- inihistrationj-No.one. wants .that' to the Bellmon. appointees must 'ppssegi'-Vabillty, experience; 'n'e added: "Had jcpuia. 'publican administration'." -Howeyf receivedi-the-votesipf-literr hundreds -of regular .Democratic party :mernbers. '-may- be 'able to win many. of them. to our party so .-that-, our party will.j become} and7win -j on mattersVof. -hii made :by 'his with officialsiof BelcHer.- all ;canj''itb Bell e nearly befor't 'they- Chopper Rescues Seven Navy Men On Radar Tower HAMILTON, Bermuda seven U.S.. Navy men a.-.stprnvbattered steel radar; tower in; the, Atlantic M miles southwest of'Bermuda on said the men were removed, .as a1 pre- said stormy', seas'with waves up; to 60'feet'and winds.'up.'to.tip miles an hour had-damaged the lower steel structure iut' that-'the; area -above where the men worked and' lived .was not damaged. -He said .an inspec- tion will be made Sunday and' if" the' tower: is 'found men will return. the Island Research Station" located south- west .in-an area through "which "the'; big- -Atlantic storm paised.--; r is similar .-in, appearance ..to the used' for ra- dar warning stations. Texai located coast' United7 Statei; fwas destroyed with of all aboard inJa SThe Waves, boat' landing' and' .other.j ages tower' .The higher rioob wtth'iNie liilicopter Uiejilatfcgii 'and brought back-; threV-men-bn'Ihe-first: trip' Time Limit Isn't Set, However WASHINGTON (AP) ?resident Kennedy is seek- ig a prompt, decisive reply :.r o m Soviet Premier iChrushchev on removal Tom Cuba of about 30 -jet jombers capable of deliver- ng "nuclear bombs against U.S. targets Kennedy "js reported to iave made clear to Moscow 'diplomatic chan- nels -that for -the United States time, is running out on the .bomber issue and the Soviet government should make its 'position known without delay. Officials said the President has, not fixed any time limit for. new- moves if the jets are not taken. out of Cuba: but it was considered significant in official quarters that the" President has set a his" first since ,p'.m. EST.. next -Tues- Clear B.Up. Authorities' said it seems .obvi- ous before tin American people to make a report on .the Cuban- situation at that: tirne he will uncer- tainty, the bomber issut cleared If Khrushchev has, by, then -re- fused; to make gdodjqn bis 'com- mitment of Oct. 28 .to take out.ot; Cuba the -Kennedy, con- sidered offensive, is understood, may order new measures ito'-tdeariwith- the tion. Among those under consider-. alien .'is a .blockade, ment- of- petrole'um'; products'. deny jet fuel forl 'r- V. Stralnea-: "'Increasing U.S. pajj .Cuba; wmi: the .discovery. 'that' pro-Castro', Cu-.i secret a apparently x intended Ipurpbsesj of sabotage.. the I1-- bombers is at the.heart Pig, tf Ada Friday ii   

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