Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: August 27, 1962 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 27, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             on progress: In one dayt news, man makes a virus In a test tube, launches a rocket toward another planet and learns that the Red Chinese an atomic bomb. All in all, it sort of cancels out. Sanders Says OC Win Was Just Luck See Sports, Page 8 New TGAY Store Opens For Business 'Today, Page 59TH YEAR NO. 143 ADA, OKLAHOMA, MONDAY, AUGUST 27, 1962 8 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY RUSSIA REJECTS PUN FOR UNPOUCED BAN Konawa Gridder Suffers Bad Injury In Practice KONAWA (Special) Don Gallagher, 16, right halfback on the Tiger squad at Konawa High School, was seriously in- jured during'.football-scrimmage Satur- day afternoon. He suffered a ruptured liver in a blocking drill about 6 p. m. as the team worked out at the ball park adjacent to the city park. The Konawa High. School student is enrolled as a junior. School opened in Konawa today. He played halfback posi- tion on the KHS squad last season He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Max Gallagher, 323 North State. Mr. Gallagher and his .wife, Lois, are owners-publishers of the Konawa Leader, weekly newspaper here. Don Underwent .surgery at Valley View Hospital Saturday and again early Sunday. His brother, Ed, OSU: student, who was at Don's, bedside early Monday, said he appears "holding his own." Hospital attendants Monday listed his condition as "poor." Dr. Northrip Heads City's Health Unit Dr: Ray U. Northrip has ac- cepted an appointment from the State. Health Department as part- time'director'of the City-County Health Unit here. The appointment as County Su- perintendent of Health was effec- tive Aug. 17, However, Northrip was "on vacation at that time. The local health department has been without a head since the resignation of Dr. K. W. Navin became effective Aug. 1. Navin resigned when the County Excise Board, after voters had approved a two-mill increase, in taxation for. the benefit of the health unit, refused to levy more than one mill.' A tentative schedule calls for the new director to be .on duty two hours on each of two after- noons a week, probably Tuesday and-Thursday. 'TKe '-.appointment -.runs until June; 1964. In addition to his new post, Northrip is .pathologist at' both Sugg Clinic and Valley View Hos- pital. He is director of the School of Medical Technology operated by Valley View in association with East Central State College. And he is also a visiting lecturer on pathology at the University of Oklahoma Medical School Northrip filled in previously In the public health post in 1954-55 the department was without a permanent director. Eastman Speaks On .Ada Traffic Bob Eastman, Oklahoma City, director of the Oklahoma Safety Council, -will appear Tuesday eve- ning at City Hall. He' will present an analysis of Ada's Traffic In- ventory for 1961, Police Chief Homer Gosncll said the city has one of the. best rec- ords in Oklahoma for 1961. Congress Buckles Down To Full Week's Work WASHINGTON (AP) Heading into what they hope will be. the final month of the session, the Senate and House buckle .down to- day to a full week of work. Twenty-two bills, several of them highly were crowded onto today's House cal- endar, to be followed Tuesday by consideration of a public works bill. The Senate's.week probably will be taken up with an unexpected fight over a House-passed tax re- vision bill stripped of many ad- ministration proposals by the Senate Finance Committee. Junior Editors News Adds New Feature Junior Editors, one of Asso- ciated Press Newsfeatures most popular .items for children, -is a new addition today on the comic page of The Ada Evening News. The feature, which will be'pub- lished daily, answers the kind of questions your children, cause the questions answered in the column are submitted by curi- ous children. Ada youngsters with good ques- tions-are invited to submit on any it's possible the question might win a prize for the-contributor. The illustrated column is used by a great many teachers in ele- mentary grades. And, many chil- dren keep a scrapbook of the columns. .It's just one of many features on a comic page designed for the entire including the popu- lar Crossword Puzzle, Dear Abby, Dr. Dean and the many popular comic'strips. Top attraction on the Hous' docket- is a proposal to eliminat payment of poll taxes as a quali fioation forvoting -in-elections in volving federal, off ice. It is one o 13 .bills, slated to be'called .up to day under a procedure requirin, a .two-thirds vote for passage. .Inasmuch as the proposal wouli submit the.poll tax issue to th states as a constitutional amen'c ment, .it -would, need vote for .passage at any time. T become effective it would' have ti ratified by three-fourths of th states. The poll tax measure: easil> mustered the count i needed in the Senate--and. its House backers were "confideri 'hey could steer it through' their branch. ;uch Texas, ant Arkansas. Sharing, top' billing -in' the .House tolay are bill dealing-with-housini fo1.' elderly persons in rural areas mergers, several measures af'ecting internal security and es talilishment of a communications satellite system. Ob'ill passed'the House; once before, stirred up hornet's nest and- a filibuster in the Senate before .'passage there and is back .in the House for. ac tion oh Senate, amendments. The. big .public works bill, which days, of -the [louse's attention, wouldjgive the President standby authority to launch building :and..other.public projects as antirecession meas ores if needed. Other .measures likely .to come Deforc the House if time permits jefore the end of the, week in elude an omnibus farm bill passec previously by the.. changed by the Senate. Was Neutrality Violated? WASHINGTON gov- ernment pressed an investigation today to determine if the.shelling of Havana violated the- U.S. neu- trality act. The State Department already has pinned on a 'Miami-based exiled Cuban students group the responsibility for Friday night's attack, but has not said whether the raiders sailed from this coun- The neutrality law prohibits launching. from U.S. soil armed attacks on countries not at .war with the United States. The Jus- tice Department is trying to: find out if-prosecutions under this law sre called-for. In a Miami news conference Sunday, Juan Salvat, leader of the students group, de- dined to say where the ships used in the off-shore shelling of Mira- mar suburb were based. But, he declared, "I don't feel we have WHERE CUBA SAYS IT WAS focuici on Cuba, capital of Havana and suburban Mlramar, which Prtmitr Fidel Castro says wore in a' from Cuban radio tht numbtr of veuoli Involved was not blimtd U.S. for. inci- dent. Cuban broadcasts said damaged sev- eral Wirtphofo violated any law of any country.' In holding the Students Revolu- tionary Directorate responsible for the -sortie the State Department warned-Saturday that "any repe- tition of such action by any group could involve the provisions of-the Neutrality Act" A" spokesman said the government had no. ad- vance knowledge of the attack. While 'U.S. have some sympathy for exiled they take the view that such hit-and-run attack; only serve to. feed Prime Minister Fidel Castro's claim that he needs Communist arms to build up his defenses. These officials point out that it .is virtually impossible vto keep- a watch on every nook and. cranny of the southeastern coastline of the United States. Airports and smaller landing fields are- under constant surveillance, 'they said. Salvat said he and 22-other men ranging in age from 19 ,-to 23 used a PT boat -and a- 31-foot' cruiser in the Taid, More -than 60 shots were fired at Miramar .during the seven-minute attack -and- a hotel headquarters of Soviet .bloc tech- nicians was damaged. "We did it as Cubans seeking freedom for our :he said. "We did it to show Demo- cratic republics the world over that we mean'- business. "I feel that if the Communists in Cuba are entitled to the :siip-' port of the- Soviet the Cuban democratic movement too is entitled to support of cratic republics of the M 1 He named 12 .men as on the raiding party, with him and with- held 'the names of'11 others to (Continued Researcher Creates A True Virus It May Be Live; Science Hails Breakthrough CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) scientist has. suc- ceeded, in making infectious viruses out of inert chemi- cals for the first time, it was reported here, today. Dr. George. W. Cochran pro- duced viruses which cause a dis- ease in tobacco plants. His test- tube viruses can infect plants. Complex Process To make the' viruses, he also put into: the test'tube the infec- tious core or nucleic acid obtained from other' tobacco, This infectious .portion1 then 'organized the -inert chemicals into the new viruses. It contains the complex genetic code to do so. Answering his own question whether this- could mean forming "life" in a test-tube, Dr. Cochran said, "If viruses are "considered to be .living objects, then the answer is yes." Aids In Study .However, he said the most sig- nificant.result was that by produc- ing viruses 'apart from 'a living cell, the virus-formation process could be 'studied more -closely in seeking .counter-weapons, permits -for..-'the .first time an understanding :-of .the biochem- istry of the virus-forming process .he said interview; "We can now examine it-in great detail, and very accurately, and should-be .able to select, chemi- They Cause Disease Viruses are .-tiny agents which cause, disease -in men; plants'and animals.-' In they -.cause colds, polio, "measles, chickenpoxi. yellow fever, sleeping sickness and various other diseases. There have been indications they may cause some forms -of cancer.. They .cause world eco-. riomic losses estimated at a billion dollars Quite Small .They are smaller than bacteria, so small they can be. seen.only. with, an electron "microscope-mag-, nifying to times. They exist on .an obscure border- line between living and nonliving possibly a link between them...... .It -was -'noted, in Dr. Cochran's experiments, that the'- building oi the-virus structure was not entire- ly man-directed. Complex Pattern The code that guided the com- plex combination pf-'-chemicals-tc form the viruses' was derived from -a "molecule '-with no -living taken'from an infected plant. It was the command mech- anism that organized Jie raw" chemicals introduced by :he .researchers into the thread- like viruses. "It zippered them together like iie-.zipper on a AEC. Grant Helps Dr. Cochran, a plant pathpligist at 'Utah .State University, 'heads a research, team- there, supported partially ;by grants from the .Na Jonal. Institutes of Health and the J.S. Atomic .Energy Commission, never 'been, pro- duced before outside of a'.'living he said, noting that'viruses often' have been reproduced in est.tubes .by-adding .-them'to-liv- ing cells, as in nature. However, 'he- said, the virus- (Continutd on Two) ITALIAN WORKERS CLASH Italy, throw'bicycles it riot in during cltih'in which 50 '.ptrioni .wtrt hurt. Vlo- Itnct flirtd tried to brtik up a protest: demonstration -blocking, traffic in, front of tht htadquirttri of an orginizition of conitruetion compinitt. Tht workers, aro ittking a piy Wirtphoto radio U.S. Spaceship Roars Toward Area Of Venus CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. Mariner. 2 space- craft rocketed into'space today-on an.-intended 109-day trip to explore the planet-Venus. Despite-a severe Old coins .are -often worth a ortune, and, as every, girl knows, he same holds true for old bucks. Copf: Gen. Tea. Corp.) hopeful they .'could, correct most of it by remote Isignlas -to an .on- board motor. Improper rocket performance released.'the 447-poiind spacecraft on a .course 'if would cause it to.miss Venus by not more than miles when the.'two make their closest ap- proach. Dec.. 14. -1 This is.fan from-the distant fly-by -.that the National Aeronautics and. Space '.Admtais- tration.had planne_d. -..Just how much the- spacecraft can be back to -.a Venus rendezvous course will not be'kno'wn precise'track- ing information''is -available. This may be several .days. -the-posltion' ofthe" spa'c'e'craftC: Jack James, Mariner manager for NASA's jet propulsion labora- tory, said the-bn-board.motor has the .capability-..'of -making, a; .000 mile correction! depending on mean Mariner'1 2 could be jockeyed onto to pass within miles, of .Venus (.computers- have precisely. defined great 'a range, for spacecraft's attitude the craft missed by a greater dis- tance, but the main goal of the experiment, would be lost. The -key Mar- iner, jxtund motor which will .be.fired ban on by ground eight days 'after- launching when. tracking tive intruments to do much.prob. ing beneath Venus' heavy blanket of clouds. But .there was a chance refined tracking, -data-..'might, .show the present .less than -and. that the probe therefore'; could pass-ctoser to the mysterious bright .planet. in exploring Venus; Mariner 2 -would have, to'approach within1 mile_s sunlit side. He said important data would'be gained about- space be- tween Earth and': Venus' even1 .if Escort For ing OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) Gov. J.'Howard Edmpndson and safety Commissioner .Ray Page said' to- day they'Hid hot cancel a Highway Patrol escort for Sen. Barry Gold- water, R-Ariz., between Ada and the Irl (Big Boy) -Rhynes ranch Saturday afternoon. "I think, he-should have had an Edmondson- said. had one for Nelson Rockefeller when he came here, and I think it's'proper for someone of Gold- water's Page said Republicans asked on- ly for special ..patrols on the 20- mile stretch of .highway leading into Rhynes' Wrinkle-. Sox Ranch; where a GOP rally was held, and this, was provided. T..E..Forester, Pontotoc County Republican chairman from complained Saturday -the escort was pulled off at the last minute, presumably by. Page, He said this delayed Gold- water's arrival from Oklahoma City. The. .GOP conservative leader addressed'.several thousand at the Rhynes .rally biggest of five staged by'Republicans .in Oklaho- ma Saturday. He. was more than an -hour late -and officials said iroBably -'one-fifth or more-of the estimated persons.'had-left before -he got there. In told-the NEWS, that -he. never actually -asked -for an -escort. He. had. gone, ito' .-the Highway Patrol and, discussed plans for the huge rally with them. Plans for. orderly movement -of traffic were outlined.-.. Rhynes'said he returned to Ada after this .meeting. Later1 he-was contacted, 'and the Patrol 'said they would be glad to provide- an escort' for Senator Goldwater. Rhynes .said as far as he was concerned the matter'was settled then. But; on the rally, on Saturday, a" (Spokes- man, from the Patrol contacted Rhynes at his "Ranch and.advised him that the'escort for Goldwater. from Ada.'to the' Ranch was .can- celled. Schools 'Enroll- Tuesday Enrollment begins at Latta 9 a.m.-Regular classes >egin -on. September, 4.rThe lunch- will operate on.; opening day. Busses make usual rounds.for enrollment; Mrs., Mene- Jtee joinsYthe .faculty .this year as a speech -instructor.. and velocity. .Then the vehicle will be more -than one. million miles away from "Earth on its.intended 180 million mile junket- past, Ve- nus and into endless orbit about the sun. Mariner 2 -blasted -away from Cape Canaveral, at a.m; atop powerful, Atlas-Agena B rocket Half an hour -later.1 the rocket in- jected the.spacecraft on an'inter- planetary trajectory...... The exact reason for the'space- .craft being off course-in its early not-'-1 ;immediately known. But officials suspected that -an -abnormal'rolling, motion in the first 'stage Atlas .rocket might have affected its trajectory. The rolling'motion occurred'for about 50 seconds of the five-min- ute Atlas flight A statement-released by the Na- tional Aeronautics, and Space'Ad- ministration five' hours "after the launch "Early tracking data fronvMar; iner -2 indicates thaj the space; craft will pass Venus by not more than miles sometime in the second 'week in December.' Be- cause of incomplete- early track- ing'data it is not now possible to refine this figure to a great .ac- curacy. the mid'course motor on Mariner 2 may be capable of correcting this to bring the. spacecraft- considerably closer to Although. Mariner 2 'was .re- leased into a. speed of miles an hour, it gradually, began to slow down as planned for the-long haul on the 109-day, 180- million mile journey that is sup: posed to-take it.'.vithin miles, of the sunlit side of Venus Dec. 14. Jack- .project manager for NASA's jet propul- sion laboratory, said-rolling'might lave damaged other instruments n the spacecraft, which. ;might af- iect -it's operation in. the. coming weeks. "The spacecraft was not de- signed for severe he said.'' "We probably wonT..know 14 whether the mission is a (Continued on PagoTwo) Plan Would Nix All Tests Except Underground Ones GENEVA (AP) Britain and the United States today proposed-a treaty for an unpoliced ban on nuclear tests in. the atmosphere, under- water and in outer space and the Soviet Union immediately turned a cold shoulder on The Western'powers proposed to continue .working for a treaty'to  as .discussed .with the congressional Joint Committee on "Atomic Energy and the -'Re- publican leadership. Republican leaders have been critical, of -tbe-'Kennedy adminis- tration 'for. what they. call water- ing dowp.the ban treaty. But the .latest .proposal repre- sents no disarma- ment officials said, .-because there has been no -insistence in the. (Continued on Two) High, temperature 1m Su--. day- wiii H; lew. Sunday 63; readlnf at. 7: OKLAHOMA Fair tfcte afternoon through TuewUy; In tempenUurt; Uw light St-72; high Tuesday 190. Note Blames Russia For Chaotic MOSCOW (AP) The United Itates, ,in: held the Soviet; Union'responsible-for shoot- ngs and, disorders along the Ber- in wall and .again- -invited it to four-power-.conference.to. deal wittr'the The note, "delivered to. .the For- eign Office '.today, replied1 to a So- iet'. note "to; the' United States-Fri- ay which protested stoning of Soviet'troop buses in West Berlin and. .warning that "necessary measures" would be taken. "The government under- stands the concern of. the Soviet government '-.about..--the _____ throwing at Soviet the American "but the Sch viet cannot expect to escape .censure for, or to .avoid; the of, permitting brutalities to occur in the sector of the city for which it is respon- sible." .-The note cited what it called the '.'wanton; provocations" in the stone Eastern' sector. should to remind the Soviet it said; "that'the present tensions in Berlin; legal erection of wall and the senseless cruelty of the police-of the Soviet sector." The note was delivered less1 than 72 hours after the Soviet note was received; setting'something of.a record in exchanges between East and West "Berlin.. -.The attention to the shoptirig of'an East German youth who let him bleed-to death out aid. It recalled also that on Aug. 23 "another young German- was shot in the back1 by the police of the Soviet sector." He was .'taken Berlin hospital but died, there. "Despite 'these wanton provoca- the-viwte-'continued, "the U.S.. authorities-- Berlin are maintaining, .law .and .order, in their.- lectori All 'traffic, including that of members of the Soviet armed.forces, U moving without It .-then repeated its invitation, given Wveral. times in the tor; officials to meet offi- cials 'of France, Britain and United; of and re- storing, normal in Ber-   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication