Ada Evening News, August 26, 1962

Ada Evening News

August 26, 1962

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Issue date: Sunday, August 26, 1962

Pages available: 22

Previous edition: Friday, August 24, 1962

Next edition: Monday, August 27, 1962 - Used by the World's Finest Libraries and Institutions

About Ada Evening News

Publication name: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Pages available: 241,891

Years available: 1904 - 1978

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Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - August 26, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma Castro Claims U.S. Prompted Havana Shelling .HAVANA (AP) Sea raiders shelled the.Havana sub urb of Miramar Friday night, hitting a hotel headquar ters of Soviet bloc technicians helping Prime Ministe Fidel Castro's government. Damage was slight, but near panic swept the hotel as sleeping guests were shake out of bed by the mid-night'bombardment.- Castro promptly blamed the United States and "mer cenary agents Cuban exiles who operate with impunit from the coast of Florida." A revolutionary Cuban student group in Miami boast ed it carried out the raid in two fully equipped vessels firing more than 60 shot Escaping Wolf Hides In Church By W. L. KNICKMEYER A church-going wolf sought sanctuary between a couple of Ada churches Saturday morning and eluded city police and county sheriff's officers intent on his capture. The wolf was first spotted by Deputy Sheriff Joe Roberts, as he (Roberts) was driving and he (the wolD was trotting north on Broad- way near Eighteenth. Before taking up the pursuit, Roberts got -on his car radio and called city police for help. Then _ Castro chargecI that sever. 1 oft more into the area. A spokesman for the group sai the bombardment, most dramati anti-Castro move since the il starred Bay of Pigs invasion 1 months ago, was made becaus of the arrival of Communist bio personnel in Cuba. "The Russian are on our soil." he said. "W cannot stand and and do nothing. The U.S. government rejecte Castro's charge of American in volvement but said it had evi dence the Miami-backed studen group staged the naval attack. The U.S. Coast Guard was or dered to seize the two private motor launches the refugees were said to'have used. The Justice De partment in Washington launchei an investigation for possible prose- cutions under the Neutrality'Act President Kennedy, weekendinj in Hyannis .Port, Mass., consultec by phone with members of his staff in Washington. he went after the wolf on foot. Ted Sears and Glenn Hunsucker answered the call and joined the chase. Jack Eden, undersheriff, heard the call on his own radio and also proceeded posthaste to the scene. Roberts meanwhile pursued the wolf west on Eighteenth. About the middle of the block, the wolf left the main-traveled road and took off-between the houses, head- ing north. At Seventeenth, the city coppers closed in, but the wolf slipped past and away. "He was just a pup." Sears said. "Not half grown. He looked about the size of a fox." The officers chased the animal around houses, through driveways, into and out of bushes, across Sixteenth, across Fifteenth. "Somewhere between the Baj> tist church on Fifteenth" Methodist church on Fourteenth, we lost Eden said. Apparently the church area was a regular hangout for the wolf. "There were tracks all around in the Eden reported. "It looked like he might have been hanging around there for a day or two or er buildings besides the hotel were hit by the shellfire. He made no mention of any casualties. The student group, the Director io Revolucion Estudiantil, said its !9-to-23-year-old sea raiders en countered return fire from the shore but escaped unharmed in the darkness. Residents of the sub urban shore saieeches relaxed like was a country fair. The first of the cars trickled in 7 a. m. At that time the grounds ere .visible, no cars in sight. By. 10 a.m. cars had filled, the arking spaces and it looked like Saturday' afternoon on the ampus at an O.U. game. At 9 a. m. the two roads lead- ing -into the rambling Bar-X turn- ed into a dusty path that from the air must have looked like the stir-up by an division of tanks.. An estimated attended. But many came .and went with- out staying for the speeches which began at plm., and it was difficult to say exactly-just how many were there. A highway patrolman directing traffic north of the ranch said -he counted cars heading onto the- sprawling ranch from the highway. First-comers sat on bales of ha; and waited to see things happen. Kids played in the open .fields across from the headquarters. A few rode, horses.- Before the big crowds came some slipped off to .a secluded fishing hole. At one of the lakes a fisherman was asked if he was-anxious to make the rally.. He answered: "Heck I'm Berlin's Still Calm Despite New Gunfire On Red Side Of The Wall BERLIN (AP) -new unfire on .the Communist side of e wall, tension in this tinderbox y appeared to be easing -Satur- y night after eight days of bitter ast-West wrangling. One burst ol gonfire in the early orning darkness was apparently med at an East German peo- E. course' and it was destroyed I pie's, arm'y soldier who made, i' by- the range safety officer after nearly five minutes of flight. FEAST OR it finally (round to ruining in Adi, It flifrilni. Like Friday, whtn a four-week drouth broktn by first light morning th'tn. an ift- thit midi for xcinti this on city Autoi ipUihtd in hubcap dttp wattr until the rain ran Staff uninjured, into West Berlin. East- guards .also halted an East German trying to swim a' canal to West Berlin and hauled him into police boat. In all, West German police esti- mated 100; rounds were', .fired by Eastern guards in four different places: As far as they could tell, no one was hit. Angry crowds, however, which a few days ago were stoning Soviet army buses and shouting insults across the Communist wall through the 'city were not to be seen as the weekend started. West Berlin police remained on the alert along the wall. .The -bitter 'indignation which' welled up after the killing on Aug. 17 of Peter an East German, seemed to be subsiding. In its place was the.old hatred and contempt for the wall and its Communist builders. Brief services for the most re- cent victim of the East German- border guards were held in Berlin without creating an -incident.. The shooting' of. Wesa' by' his comrades at; the command of East German Communist leader Walter M. Ulbricht illustrates "the, wretchedness of Germany's Albertz said.. The Soviets' changed their guard at the Red 'war! memorial in West Berlin in, recoi'd time, using the three armored personnel carriers instead" of buses. At the international crossing point of the wall, Checkpoint Char- lie, they picked up an American Army escort as 'ordered by the U.S. commandant, Maj. Gen. Al- bert Watson II. The convoy sped to the monu- ment near Brandenburg Gate, de- livered the "i8, soldiers and picked up the troops-being relieved: The carriers, were back at Checkpoint Charlie in 32 minutes with.a Brit- ish army escort. The Russians, who seem to be trying to prove that it is dangerous for them to :move'.through 'West Berlin after the stonings earlier in the week, attracted .little attention. West Berlin police have placed barbed wire hear the checkpoint to keep back crowds, but it was not needed. Additional police also, are provided whenever the Soviets' appear with their personnel car- down here trying to catch a bass or two." Some'of the others admitted to just coming down for fun. Before lines formed for barbe que, some cars-took tours of fliresented by .the Sanitary JEhgi- neering with East Ctentral as host .Coop- erating were- State Department. of Health and the PHS Regional Office in Dallas. More than 30 experts in Atmos- pheric Wat- er Quality Studies and Environ- mental Radiation'. Surveillance (the three divisions -of the Insti-.- tute) .held forth during the week.-. 'i.The largest enrollment was'en- countered in the Water Quality division of the short course. This division held' special-interest. lo- cally in relation to the new South- west Regional Pollution Laborato- ry which, will .be located on a site south ofT Ada. More-than foo stu- dents.from: over lix i attended classes at EC, -all in the Education Building. The final .speaker in Water Quality, studies Friday afternoon was assistant di- rector of-Hjie -Oklahoma Water Resources Board. Nelson -spoke -on-, "The Legal Aspects, of A Pollution Abatement Program." He .noted that; it-might seem' some- 'that Oklahoma has'fourseparate agencies actual- concerned .with pollution; These ;are the Corporation. Com- mission, the" -Water Resources Slatt Department; of Health and the -Department- of Wildlife Conservation." "You might think it is funny that, all these agencies'are in- said, "but it frequent- ly takes all 'of them to bring somebody around." Nelson needled Chamber of Commerce officials who-help industry :to Oklahoma and are not concerned, as such industries handle waste problems. 'He ha t such waste problems 'were.-'uf his opinion, sometimes by promoters, suggesting waste be disposedrof-iby dumping it in the creek." Nelson noted that the oil indus- try is the biggest source of pollu- tion in Oklahoma. But he clarified his position by pointing out that the big offenders are not "major" companies. He said the .real '.the. "strippers and junkers." Small operators lacked sufficient' funds -to ade- quately handle pollution Nelson added that real progress had: beenlmadevln this: division through the authority'of the Cor- poration Commission. .And he urged those present. who encount- ered difficulties 'in' this "-sxea-'to'j work In this channel. Nelson attributed much of the effective -work on enforcement to the State Department of Wlidlifa Conservation, "When a fish floats to the top of. the he said, "brother, you've hadjt .They can get "you" to' >w6, per day and they. do. Ana" it is making a real difference." -He'commented that abandoned wells still are a headache. "I don'tfknow what we'll do in this he :said. "Texas has ac- tually appropriated state fun'ds to go in and .plug these things pro- (Continued ;