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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 29, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 29, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             SOBL6N AFTER ARREST IN TEL AVIV Dr. Robtrt A. Sobltn, convicted of spying for Rustia, who from United covers fact in a police car after nil arrest in Tel Aviv, Israel. Soblen fled from New York before he was slated to surrender to itart serving a life sentence. was (AP Israeli Doctors Supervise Soblen TEL AVIV, Israel (AP) Fugitive Soviet spy Dr. ROD- ert A. Soblen was under medical supervision in a prison hospital today while Israeli authorities studied a request for Ms return to New York to begin serving a life term. The ailing, 62-year-old Soblen, seized here less than 60 hours after he jumped bail in New York, was taken to the hospital in Ramleh Prison when he complained he did not feel well. A doctor testified at his trial last June that Soblen was incurably ill .with ---------------------------------leukemia cancer of the II f blood and then, had 12 Furor Over Rhodesia UNITED NATION, N. Y. The U.N. General Assembly has asked that Britain call a confer- ence soon to draft a new consti tution for Southern Rhodesia giv- ing a vote to every man in that British African territory whether he is black or white. The resolution faces an uncer- tain future. Britain's chief dele- gate to the U.N. said it was un- acceptable and impracticable. An African political leader from the territory warned that if Britain ignored the assembly's advice, bloody revolution might follow. The tesqluticTi was sponsored by 38 African and Asian countries and toughened by a Bulgarian amendment. The assembly adopt- ed it late Thursday in the last act of its 16th annual session, the longest ever, which started Sept. 18. The vote was 73-1 with 27 ab- stentions. Only South Africa voted1 against the resolution. The Com- munist countries almost all Af- rica and Asia and more than half of Latin America voted for it. The (Continued on Page Two) months to live. A spokesman for Israel's justice ministry indicated his- govern ment would be sympathetic to ward Washington's demand for Soblen's return. He said Israe does not want to become a refuge for persons convicted abroad, The United States and Israel'do not have an extradition treaty, bu informants here said Israel coult hand Soblen over anyhow. They reasoned that Soblen was convict- ed of a political crime, rather than a common criminel offense and that such crimes as espion age are not within normal extra- dition treaty terms. Soblen, former supervising psy- chiatrist at Rockland State Hos pital in Orangeburg, N.Y., had been scheduled-to show up in New York federal court Thursday to begin the life sentence for 20 years of spying. The U.S. Supreme Court refused last Monday to re- view the case, and Soblen then iled the country. A U.S. District Judge in New York ordered the bail for feited when Soblen failed to ap- pear. Soblen's wife, a psychiatrisl whose professional name is Dr. Dina Soble, had posted and the remaining U.S. gov- ernment bonds, was put up by Men Buttenwieser, a lawyer, and niece of former Senator Herbert H. 59TH YEAR NO. 93 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1962 10 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Moslems, Europeans Seek Reconciliation ORAN, Algeria steps toward Moslem-European reconciliation were under way to- day as Europeans in this battered city prepared for a Moslem ad- ministration to take over soon. But as a committee met to fos- ter good 'will, Europeans still packed their belongings to -flee, and flames leaped into the sky from a huge fuel oil fire raginj for the fifth day in the dock area The latest and most pointec reconciliation movement was re- ported late Thursday by a French government spokesman. He saic a cross-section group of Euro- peans met with 'Moslem, counter- parts and later issued a- statemenl urging both communities to work together in harmony for the future. The meeting also produced a 28- member reconciliation committee, half European, half Moslem. This High temperature in Ada Thursday was 86; low Thursday night, 69; reading at 7 a. m. Friday, 72. Rainfall to 7 m. Friday was .06 Inch. OKLAHOMA Cloudy east to partly cloudy wtst with Httle temperature change this after- loon through Saturday; widely scattered mostly afternoon and evening thunderahowers mainly east and central low tonight 62-72; high Saturday 15-90, committee arranged what it hoped might be a massive meeting.in the city's main square, Saturday day before the self-determi- nation vote. A column of black smoke that filled the air of half the city was testimony of 18 months of intense animosity. The fire, set'Monday by the European Secret Army Organization, flared up anew Thursday night, despite millions (Continued on Page Two) Churchill Flies Back To London Grand Old Man In High Spirits Despite Injury LONDON (AP) Sir Winston Churchill returnee to London by. jet-powerec flying ambulance and flashed his fighting 'V-for victory sign despite his broken thigh and its threa of major surgery. The old.battler, wearinj green' pajamas, smilec bravely as his stretcher was lowered from- the Royal Air Force Comet that.brough him home from his short lived vacation .on the Rivi era. A room was ready for him a the Middlesex Hospital near Lon don's West End. There'authorities said he may have 'to. undergo an operation for his injury. Leg's In Cast His left leg in a plaster cast af ter a fall in his Monte Carlo noli d T hotel room Thursday, Brit 87-year-old wartime leader looked pale hut as undefeated as ver. Lady Churchill was the first to move toward the plane. She was accompanied by Lord Moran Churchill's old friend and doctor and Randolph Sir Win ston's only son. Reited Well Churchill was reported _to have had a restful night at Princess Grace hospital in Monte Carlo. An ambulance brought Churchil from the hospital to Nice, a few minutes from Monte Carlo, ant drove directly onto the airfield. Churchill's Anthony Montague Browne, said the. dough- ty old warrior had enjoyed a gooc breakfast and was in high spirits Churchill appeared-in such a mood when he was carried out 01 the 'hospital and put aboard the ambulance..- He Eyei Photographers He gazed around at a horde o: photographers and :looked up at open hospital windows from which doctors and nurses were peering After blinking once or twice in the bright morning sunshine, Sir Winston flashed a wide grin. He kept his hands beneath his blan- kets, in spite of appeals from the photographers .for his fa- mous "V for victory" gesture. Hospital attaches paid tribute to Churchill's iron constitution.. One said a lesser man would not have been able- to endure the' flight back to England so soon after such an accident. Thanks Comment From his hospital bed. before his departure, he sent a telegram, to the House of Commons expressing thanks for'messages of concern voiced in the House. Doctors-pronounced Churchill in good condition Thursday night af- ter setting and.apply- ing a plaster cast from his left ankle to above the hip. Churchill. has. been amazingly resilient, recovering from at least two heart. attacks, a bout .with pneumonia and another: fall that fractured a small bone in his Hospital sources said the doc- tors could allow the break to knit naturally or they could- job' the broken ends with metal pins or dates in an operation under gen- ;ral anesthesia. Such an operation, one medical ;ource, said, might enable Churchill to'get up sooner, than if ie were allowed to-lie and mend [radually; Churchill's accident ended a liviera vacation only "two days after -he arrived to spend- two weeks as the guest of Greek ship- ping magnate Aristotle Onassis. Mexico Thunders Welcome To Kennedy On His Arrival JUST. TIRED One of .the oldest buildings in Wapanucka collapsed recently, apparently out of sheer weariness. Built .in 1907 of native, stone quarried'near the 'town, it was fo'r- M. welding shop occupied the easl: side. For- tunately the-structure gave preliminary-warning of disaster. It had. been condemned about a week before -it fell. Then, mtriy thifOdb1 Ftllbwi Hall. photo of stonework. at -Friday morning .two jt just is.on-Page owners George Harris, let everything go and in on itself. (N6WS who "used the'west' arid' Ticket Sales Increase For Chamber's Banquet Results Of Rusk's Trip Please JFK WASHINGTON j Ticket sales are increasing The first of these is the South- of. State Dean Rusk- reported-to President Kennedy today on his 10-day capi- tals and said .he found the Presi- dent very pleased with the results of the trip. Monday night's annual Chamber of Commerce banquet '-here; fea- turing an. address by Gordon E.. McCallum, assistant surgeon gen- eral. 'Dinner hour has been set- for .7; p. m. Monday in the ballroom of Control, manages-the section-.of the Department-of Health, Edu- cation, and Welfare that will oper- ate- the regional water pollution- laboratories. Snake's Flat Tired! Rusk is understood to' have, in-.j th'e Meraoriai student Union Build- formed' Kennedy that his mission ing at East central State College.- succeeded up'some Al- McCaUum! chief of the Division lied .misunderstandings'-although; o{ Water .Supply.' and. Pollution serious difficulties and divisions continue within "the ranks" of the North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- ion. Rusk returned Thursday night and went to the White House early his morning. Questioned about 'the -40-minute conference, Rusk told newsmen: "I gave him a full fill-in on-the visiti.tp each capital this morning. We're both very pleased .with the results ;of the trip." Rusk a promise of French leaders to dis- :uss at some future date the :pos- sibility of coordinating France's mclear weapons-strategy, includ- ing potential targets of attack, with that of the United States and' 3ritain. In, turn; .he is understood to have made 'clear 'to President Charles' de .Gaul .'.that .the 'United Itates understands :'France's'.-ae- ermination 'to. go- aheadi.with -de-, relopmentof" a--riuclear. .striking orce, even though Washington is (Continued on Pagt Two) western.Regional Water-Pollution Laboratory, announced for Ada last October. This Chamber of Commerce dinner becomes the first opportunity-for the public to hear-directly the.-details of the huge research facility. "The annual banqueLtraditionally marks: the changing- "of officers and of the Chamber of Commerce. .Although, the new ad- ministration already has taken the1 annual banquet furnishes the' ceremony for the change. Carroll'C.'Collier, banker, suc- ceeds Frank E.' super- This is a snake.story to end all snake stories. It' happened Thursday, south of Tupelo. Three Ada coon, hunters, E. M.'Manuel, R. L. Johnson and Anglin were 'driving along the road in Manuel's pick-" "up when they were forced to" stop because, of .a flat tire on', the left front wheel. 'Anglin alighted to change the wheels. He wielded the, tire tool big-hub cap.: As the -cap .fell from ..the wheel, he out a. whoop'and .jumped back quickly. "There's a snake in that hub Anglin. About, that an. 18-inch "copperhead, 'apparently' as con- fused as- the" ward- Anglin'.' The latter man grabbed, the .tire, tool and final- ly killed the-venomous snake. How the copperhead .got into the hub cap is much of a.mystery. "There-are fqur.'openings .in the wheel frbm-tiie-inside'.-and'it could through Manuel .muses. At any..rate, .Anglin is. apt to be .sort-of'shy -about changing tires for. some, time, to market operator, as president-of the Chamber of Commerce. Half the for two-year terms replace retiring' board members. East1 Central State College mu- sic department-will present spe- cial- entertainment. Interest.has grown.here in the water .pollution laboratory, origi- nally estimated as a million institution, having a staff of about 150, half scientists and engineers. The building, to be -located south of the, city on'land, donated-by. the Sciences., and .Natural -Resources Foundation, of Oklahoma, is being designed by architects how. The first .session -of the 87th Congress authorized' the eventual establishment of seven.' regional laboratories. Heretofore, -the san- itation laboratory, at Cincinnati has provided the only research for the government. McCallum .will speak of theydire problems facing nation and the role of this laboratory-in their solutions. Himself a sanitary, en- gineer, McCallum -has been with the Public-Health Service more than 20. years. Tickets should-be.purchased as soon as. They are avail- able at Bryan's. .Corner Drug, Oklahoma State1 First Na- tional Clothiers, and both motor banks; The Cham- ber of- Commerce, office also has them, as well as. several banquet committee members. V- Thousands Line Streets Of Capital; Chief Says Castro's Common Threat MEXICO CITY (AP) President Kennedy received a massive welcome today as he arrived in this festive capital and called on Mexico .and the United States to carry on common revolutionary traditions by waging a new battle for economic and social progress. Hundreds of thousands of Mexicans massed at the air- port and along the -motorcade route as the U.S. chief executive and his wife landed for a. three-day visit south of the border. The main streets were gay with paper Mexican and U.S. flags hastily repaired after a night downpour.. Welcomed by President Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Kennedy delivered a brief airport speech-keyed to the burgeoning cold war over Latin America that is posed by Marxist Fidel Castro-of Cuba. Mexico and the United States, he said .in his speech as pre- pared for delivery, "are both chil- dren of revolution" who share a more than. miles of peaceful border. Both the Mexican and the American revolutions, he said, had a common "passion for the expansion of social justice, eco- nomic opportunity, national inde- pendence and personal freedom." The struggle today, he said, is to complete the work of revolu- tionary. ancestors, "to carry for- ward a hemisphere-wide Alliance of Progress to win a better .and more abundant life for the people of the Americas." This task is as vast and heroic, he declared, as that undertaken by "Washington and Hidalgo, 'by Juarez and Lincoln." He referred to Miguel Hidalgo, the Mexican revolutionist 'who died .in 1811, and Beni'to Pablo Juarez, the-Mexican last; The task, he said, required con- tributions -by industrialized coun- tries to nations seeking develop- ment, and basic social reforms.to share the fruits of progress with all The new revolution, Kennedy said, is "not' a revolution of force or fear, not the .impositions of new tyrannies or new bloodshed" but a peaceful revolution to. show democratic government's capaci- ty to. attain.' social justice' and economic progress. The President's speech was a prelude 'to private talks with Lo- pez Mateos, which are expected to deal with a touchy subject- Mexico's firm aloofness from eft forts to completely ostracize Cas- tro's Cuba.- fiercely are- not likely attitude. to change their Latin America, a- possible show- case for what Kennedy's Alliance [or Progress can do, and a mem- ber of the recessed :i8-nation.dis- armament conference in Geneva, so there, are other things in com- mon; to be discussed. This city of five million turned out massive -throngs.along the pa- rade route- from the airport to Lopez Mateos'- offices at Los Pinos. The route wound past nonde- script neighborhoods of tumblS- down shops, new housing, past' a dramatic view of the 16th :entury National Cathedral, built jy Cortez after the Spaniards con- quered the Aztecs, through Ayenida Juarez past the Latin- American Tower, tallest skyscrap- er in Latin. America, and into the :amed tree-lined, Paseo de la Re- 'orrna and its gilts monument of he Angel of: Independence. (Continued on Two) Attack On Alcoholism: V Avenues Of Assistance EDITOR'S has yet to unravel the dark mystery which lies in the body or in the soul-of ah alcoholic, demanding drink. But small advances in knowledge are being made. This last .in a series describing the modern attack- on alcoholism re- ports these advances and lists some-'helpful do's and don'ts. By ALTON BLAKESLEE Associated Frees Science Writer At 3 a.m., in a fuzzy young man telephoned.; a vdoctbr le'd never met, askirig'-'for an appointment. He burst into -.the office early n the-.morning, demanding of those .pills to: keep: me from drinking. I've got to stay: sober the next few impor- Many a frantic wife-lias wished for a pill or-.powder she- could surreptitiously'drop into her hus- band's coffee, and thus magically stop -his -drinking. There Js an; antidrinking drug, but it's: .no magic coffee :affair.t This drug -'is (Jisulfiram name It is completely harmless; until a.; person "drinks any, :he becomes violently It acts as. :fencr re-. inforcirig deter- mination notr to drink. It must be phy- for. could be .alcoholic tH at. he's; it; arid .what It easy'answer: the'ryoung: man, except toward real desire to stpp drink- i The road back'from alcoholism is tortuous can be-done psy- chologically Fox, medical; director; of .the ..Na- tional; Council on; A first; ,-of and" diet-.'The.'.alcc- JioliC'.often has .liver, ;nerve or other damage. He. mayweed; hospital-, care jfp'r a time. can 'help; mood through aimed derstand' himself tiohal "die them' without; In.-. "the Mystery Behind Alcoholism patient can find help available 24 hours a day. In AA, 'he or she also': finds intellectual, cul- tural and spiritual interests long since abandoned in the dedication to drink, Dr: Fox continues; Clergymen increasingly are helping' alcoholics find useful, new Jives. Hypnosis', in hands .-.of trained can' assist al: coholics to relax.. '.ten- sions, -Dr." Fox says. Hypnotic suggestions to.'restore -rself-esteem can' be' the alcoholic who is -feelings of aagef; Jealousy, fear, bitterness qi: -v Psychodrania ;is 1'anbther In- .alcoholics' ifaml-, titudes and influences. All treatments, the, physician points., have -a cbmmon'vgoal: Understanding and the need for total abstinenece, of life drink. I :The 'downfall-' of" -the 'alcoholic has been blamed; on" faulty or lazy glands, or lack of Vita- mins, and biochemical- up- sets. -But simply. replacing "the missing-, .chemicals .proved. disappointing -in; 'treating- or .-pre- venting: alcoholism, Dr. .Fox. says; Some find a'hprmone prepara'tibnijhelpfulUn'coiiibattihg the and ;.the jitters, come.j, along when ;the'.alcohdlic '.has given up ly for .Th'e: ace- or adrenal by. in- hormone' alcoholic' sive. Its use is based on evidence that in alcoholics the cortex or outer' covering of.. .the' adrenal gland .is not -producing normal amounts or hormones. .Much of current -.research is stressing bio- chemical differences between alcoholic and. some-, authorities are optimis- tic 'that' turned to: pinpoint causes -.and improved treatment. There; that the alcohol i-'dlff erendys'frohi. the nor- nb'ftwits? orjmethods of who is of becoming an ;The center ;for. alcphpL studies, GOP Asks Session To Apportion OFOLAHOMA CITY (AP) Re- publican legislators urged Gov. J. Howard Edmondson .Thursday to call a; -special session of the legis- lature immediately to reapportion according to the Constitution. But Rep. Milton C. Craig of Chandler .declared there is. no hope that Edmondson will call a special session because "it would ruin the Democratic party." Craig said a special; session would result-in the election of Re- publican Henry Bellmon as gov- ernor. Craig also claimed the gov- ernor would suffer from investi- gations which would be .started if the legislature were called into special session. About 25-GOP legislators and nominees'for "the House and'Sen- ate mcti here Thursday to discuss should take regarding' Teapportionment The group- voted' to give state GOP chairman Forest W. Beall authority: to name a study group to take a look at the legislative reapportionment picture and re- port to the state party convention in Enid July M. Party'members said an official stand would be adopted then, but Beall said Thursday the party will continue to support constitutional reapportionment. A special three-judge federal court last week threw out Oklaho- ma's present apportionment laws and suggested the governor call a special session of the. legislature for reapportionment The- court also hinted .that fav- orable action on an initiative pe- tition to force constitutional reap- oortionment. might be acceptable. pending before the" state Supreme Court, would But Mexico is a key country in for reapportionment for reapportionment for the 1965-.leg- islature. Jack Hewett, Republican mem- 3er. of the state- Election Board, told the GOP gathering he did not believe the petition, if approved by' the people, .would meet the court's ap'provaL Hewett said he interpreted the ruling to mean new legislative districts .must be drawn before Parachutists Plan Jumps At Sulphur Rodeo A sky-diving exhibition to let. cowboys see what it's like to fall from 'instead of eight feet will be part.of .the rodeo program of the annual 'Hereford Heaven Stampede Friday .In Sulphur. To combine the thrill of the sport with-one of-the'natioh's old- .est, Harry Garmanj Ardmore, will put on a parachuting exhibition at p.m. Friday at the Sulphur airport. The. event is sponsored by .the'Sulphur Chamber of Com- lerce. The. Stampede opened Wednes- day afternoon with !a street parade with nightly-performances sched- uled for. 8 p. ,-m; Wednesday through Friday. exhibition ganistan Kites" will be given by .students-froth ''American Ardmore.-. The kites, which are maneuvered have been flown in Afganistan for more recently transferred to Rutgers University, for years has spear- beaded careful scientific studies of all aspects of human use of alcohol, and. alcoholism. -And the federal through' the National Institute of Mental now is-, 'spending several million-. .'on ;re- Social, and family 'attitudes are still roadblocks jn. dealing with al- coholism, says Mrs.- Marty Mann', executive -directbripf -the 'National Council on -Alcoholism. "Too'-many: still .attach a: .social alcoholism, Vai There ?are 'Mil people in; key places'. who; don't. ,jt- as a 'iv'-i-vi'v j V For 'guidance.; (Conttnuod on Two) Some people; grow, old grace- fully; otherj attempt the Gen. Fea. dotp.)   

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