Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 4, 1962 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Ada Evening News

Location: Ada, Oklahoma

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 4, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             Atlanta's Mayor Arrives In Paris For Grim Task ...._'__ ...i.- u-j tn nf Air France's most wildlv over a rolling, wooded of Paris' sunniest days this sum-the aut PARIS (AP) The grieving mayor of Atlanta arrived in Paris today to help identify bodies of cultural leaders of his city, vic- tims of the worst single-plane disaster in aviation history. Mayor Ivan Allen had set out on his sad journey soon after an Air France jetliner crashed back to earth as it took off Sunday and burst into flame. A total of 130 persons were 121 pas- sengers, 8 crewmen and Air France's Atlanta agent. Investigators studied reports in- dicating the plane developed some trouble as it roared down the Orly UUULJlc as i. wcii t-w -j Field runway for its takeoff and pulled alive 'from the flaming the pilot tried unsuccessfully to wreckage but died in a hospital. Mayor Allen' hurried to inspect brake to a halt. _ All the passengers were Amen outside Paris. A steward was] foreign ministry and the ministry scene of accident imme- e scene o accen mm- cans and most were from Atlanta j jjiately after arrival in. another and members of the 797, jie that along Atlanta Art Association en route with identification of the bodies home with happy memories W0uld also arrange for their nf a fhrflft-WCek tOUr 4... 1 mementoes of a three-week tour art galleries and of European cultural sites. Only two Air France hostesses- seated in the tail end of the big Boeing flung to safety in the naming crash at Orly Field transport home. The mayor was accompanied by Edwin Stern, 'assistant city attorn Edwin city attorn- ney of Atlanta. They were met by the crash and. to hear official re- officials of Air France, Orly on the accident port, the Paris city council, the I He'expressed thanks-to every- Stunned City Finds Tragedy Overwhelming ATLANTA (AP) Everywhere people asked That was the city of a million inhabitants as described by Publisher Ralph McGill of the Atlanta Constitution after word spread like wildfire of the disaster overseas that had snuffed out the lives of more than, a hundred who had helped make this Southern metropolis an arts is an awesome McGill wrote in his column today "to be confronted with the ancient truth that in ----------the midst >of life we are in death. "When it occurrs in the mass, as in a battle or the -explo- sive smash of aircraft, the shock of it is one which makes a com- munity grow silent and put its mind to the business of trying to understand the swift transition of more than 100 men, women and children from life to McGill wrote that some hus- bands now are blaming them selves because they didn't accom- pany their wives to Europe and death. They didn't really- want to Billy Graham Says Country Is In Peril CHICAGO (AP) Evangelist Billy Graham addressed the larg- est crowd of his 19-day Chicago crusade for Christ Sunday and said Americans "are at the edge of an abyss and are about to fall in." An estimated 'crowd of   the city, Saturday evening, Mrs. on by 43-year-old Assemblyman Ayres told authorities, and de- Joseph C. Shell in Tuesday's bal- cided to go inside. When Mr. loting overshadowed other races Weston didn't join her in a' rea- involving the biggest field ofcan- Jceep tne note ot envy out ui ma uiujt i juiii uei iu a j.ca- voice while accusing his opponent sonable length of'time, she went didate s in the state's history. of fooling the public. (Copr. Gen. but to see about him and found Election officials predicted the Tea Corp) he was gone.____ Nixon-Shell clash, six ballotmeas- wanis Club 'of Greater Ada. j Moore City; James Dunagin, Cynthia Brannon, Stonewall j Oklahoma City, Wright City; John sponsored by Richardson Buick, IPjnc, Skiatook, Belfofd City; Joe was elected to the same office in! Cooper. Grainola, Haskall .City; the city of Hunnicutt-on the Boom-! Rick .Wolfe, Pawhuska, Clark City; Stu. 'Berryhill, Cleveland, Trapp City; Larry Keith, Oklaho- ma City City; and. Croc- kett White, Sayre, Brundidge "Sooners" Prevail In Girls' State Balloting CHICKASHA par- ty candidates won election- as mayors of nine mythical cities Sunday at-the 20th annual Girls State here on the campus of Okla- homa College for Women. Boom- er candidates won four posts. The 390 girls attending the week- long Girls State' were scheduled to see demonstrations in civil de- Stater from this area, John Day of one1 of the 12 may- ors. Day was elected mayor of Rennie City. Other mayors: Jim Bowie, Pauls Valley, Sullivan City: Richard .Dunlap, Skiatook, Whitely City; Jon Blaschke, -Oklahoma City, er ticket. Judy Ada, was elected State Party Committee Member of the Sooner party in McAlester. Miss Granger is'sponsored by the Rotary Club. Also elected'to State Party Committee was Paula Landrith, Ada, Paula, who is sponsored by the Lions Club, '.was elected on the 'Boomer ticket in the mythical city of Buck. The first two days-has brought a rourid of committee meetings and general sessions. City cau- cuses were.held Saturday after- noon after the opening ceremony in which the 390 Girls Staters were welcomed. Dr. S. W. Evans conducted the- first of a series .of preceding Saturday government classes city party caucuses. night saw reports on the 1961 Girls Nation given by Miss Jonel Fer- guson, 1961 governor, and Miss Marge Diamond, Holdenville. Sunday morning brought a chapel service and- city elections. During general assembly 'Sunday, afternoon Mayor Bill Sullivan gave the. oath of'office to officials of the 13 mythical cities. (Continued on Two) City. Boys State consists of a week of intensive political- activity- and classroom work, culminating -this coming weekend with final ex- aminations and 'a dance. Gary Clinton, Ada, is also a member of Boys State. Ada also has two delegates to Girls State. -Paula Landrith and Phyllis Warmack are attending Girls State at Chickasha this week! Vandals Scribble Swasticas On Wall pojti irr now bting long from Miuiiiippi to Hit campus. They will continue on'around on north i'nd touth to Stidium Drive. limpi are the new mercury type will provide "white way lighting along theie buiy Staff McCarty Picks Wolf For Floor Leader Post .OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) Le-IJ. W. (Dub) Bynum, Locust land Wolf, 58-year-old Cleveland! Grove -merchant completing his County.farmer completing his 10th first term, David Atkinson, Tulsa 11.. finishiriP ye'ar.in the legislature, today .was named to a'-second consecutive term as majority floor leader of the House, of Representatives.- The announcement Was made by Rep. J. D. Oklaho- ma City, who will 'serve a second straight term as the House speak- er starting next. January. McCarty said he and W. P. .Bill Atkinson, Democratic nominee for governor, concurred .in the selec- tion of Wolf and four assistant floor .leaders. He and Wolf both declared they are for'Atkinson's proposed, penny sales tax increase, expected to be submitted to the legislature-next January. The Noble. farmer said he was not'active in the Democratic race for'governor .this but did support Atkinson, His 'son, .Leland Jr., formerly worked for.the Dem- ocratic nominee from Midwest City. Wolf was author of several tax-. BOGOTA Colombia (AP) raising bills which were mtroduc- Swastikas with .the legends, "We ed in the House last year but will' avenge Eichmann" appeared Hlpm W9S Sunday on three downtown build- ings; Police attributed the daub- ings to. vandals.-.. Adolf Eichmann, a former Ges: tapo colonel "accused of master- mination of- 6 million Jews dur- ing Hitler's regime, -was executed Thursday night in- Israel. did not pass. One 'of 'them was almost identical1 to Atkinson's pro- posed increase in sales tax from 2 to 3 cents. Joseph Mountford, Miami attor- in the House, was named first as- sistant floor leader. Other assis- tants for the 29th session will be Bomb Lands In 720 Feet Of Water Near Johnston Island; Doesn't Explode HONOLULU (AP) A nuclear warhead intact or as debris fell into 720 feet of water off Johnston Is- land today when a missile carrying it aloft was itself ex- ploded less than two minutes before the bomb was to be detonated. A Joint Task Force 8 spokesman said he did not know the condition of the warhead, intended as the first high altitude nuclear device to be exploded in the U.S. test series at Johnston Island. The spokesman -had no information on whether the device itself was destroyed when the big Thor intercon- tinental ballistic missile -was deliberately .exploded be- cause of a .malfunction in the tracking system.' He was unable to. tell whether salt water corrosion could'set off he warhead if it lies on Pacific Ocean .bottom.over an extensive )eriod of time. Nor could he say whether the device would give off radioactivity. "Those are'scientific finance agency omploye finishing his first term. McCarty released 'copies of a letter sent to all Democratic nom- inees' 'and reporting on his con- ferences last week with Atkinson. "I am glad to report that jthe meeting was a most cordial anc cooperative one "and that, the se- lections as follows .were made in complete .harmony between us and. I sincerely hope that-they meet with your he wrote, McCarty said he did not know for sure whether the tax-raise pro- posal will be submitted to the leg- islature or directly to -the people. In explaining why he is for it, he said "f think we've got -to have more finances for state govern- ment." He said additional state finances and more money for, cities and towns are Oklahoma's great needs and .Atkinson is trying to solve them. "We need more Wolf agreed. Bynum and Atkinson also re- portedly supported the. Midwest City builder in the primary race. Mountford, an'original supporter Rail Union Negotiations Resume Today CHICAGO (AP) Negotiations resumed .today between represent- atives of the nation's railroads and union chiefs-'representuig 000 non-operating workers. G. E. Leighty, -chairman of the .ommittee representing the' 11 non-operating unions, said there is a 50-50 chance for quick agree- ment on pay raises for the work- ers. James E.' WolfeJ. chief, spokes- man for the railroad negotiating team, declined to comment. A presidential fact-finding .board has recommended a wage 'in- crease of 10.2 cents an hour -for clerks, telegraphers, shop crafts- men, and others.in the-11-unions. But management said -it .was rec- ommending too much, and labor termed the increase too; small. Wages for the-.nori-operating em- ployes now :average an hour. President Kennedy last month said it is up. to' both sides to -nego tiate-a.hon-inflationary settlement. He: did not say whether a 10.2 cents'raise would be non-inflation- ary. The railroads' have estimated that a raise of the size recom- mended by the.fact-finding board would cost mQlion''an- nually. Under the Railway Labor Act the unions were free Saturday to call, a strike but they declined to do so, awaiting-today's bargaining JOScUU 1V1UUI1L1ULU, JTiicuiii ney completing his second term of Sen. Fred Harris, 'Lawton, 'and Green reportedly leaned toward former Gov. Raymond Gary in the runoff. It's Do-Or-Die Day For Ri Nixon By.MOREIE LANDSBERG SAN-FRANCISCO ard .Nixon's battle -for the Repub- lican nomination for governor and a major campaign effort by politi- cal conservatives fired up inter- est today in California's primary election. The surprising challenge to Nix- .ures and spirited competition'for eight new congressional seats would bring out bdtter than 65 per cent 'of seven .million voters: In there are. 671-, contenders for party nominations six state 'offices, U. S. senator, 38 congress- men, 80 state assemblymen1 and 20 of the 40 state senators. .salvos .carried a familiar pattern: Shell denounced Nixon .-and Democratic 'Gov.. Edmund G. Brown. s Brown assailed Nixon and Shell. Nixon laid into said not a word about Shell. The former vice'president has acted 'throughoutvon. the. premise that he'll win "theprim'sry" and he doesn't want the Shell.vote in--the November elec- tion. He has ignored Shell's at- tacks. Complete Primary Roundup, Page 4 With the -state registered 4-3 it's essential for Re- publican candidaies. to, hold .their own party ancTget at'least 20 per cent.of ths Democratic vote. Shell renewed criticism of Brown's -budget policies. He ac- 'cused Nixon, of. and declared he's T better equipped than, Nixon to defeat Borown. Nixon, in charac- terized Brown as weak and inef- fective, with. "a compulsion. 'to duck difficult decisions'and to put his foot .in his Brown, opposed only by three minor-candidates on the Demo- cratic .Republican vo- pri- mary race for "They will have to he said in Los Angeles, "between an assemblyman whose philosophy is a' century behind the .tunes and a loser-from Washington who is to'.posi- tion himself'for-another crack at the presidency in ;'-Nixon's; camp has made-no ef- fort to discount the-effect ;of Shell's aggressive campaign. A spokesman has conceded -that the Assembly minority .-leader 'might of .the Republican vote. Supreme Court Frees Freedom Riding Group WASHINGTON Su preme Court overturned today tb conviction of' six Negroes on charges of disturbing the peace a a Continental-Trailways bus sta tion in Shreyeport, La. The court's action was nounced in an unsigned opinion Justice Harian said the cour should have heard argument on the case .before acting. Justice Frankfurter took no part. The court's vote was thus 7-1. Four of the Negroes were ar rested iri the -station after police ordered them to leave a "white1 waiting room and go to a room designated for colored The four, said they were waiting for a bus to Jackson, Miss., and did not leave the "white" section on the .police order. Two other Negroes, David James. Dennis and.Harry Blake, remained outside the station in an automobile and were, arrested lat- er. about two blocks distant. The appeal by the six. Negroes to the high tribunal said their con- victions were based on a holding by the trial .court that "the mere presence of Negroes in a waiting room customarily reserved ...for white persons ..is sufficient evi- dence, breach the The. said they were denied: due-process: as guar- ariteed'by tht U.S. Constitution. he said. "-You'll have to get the answers from Washington." In Washington there was no im- mediate comment from the Atom- Energy, spokesman. indicated there might je information -on some such points later in the day. The ;Coast Guard said it would not declare .the area around the aborted missile dangerous to nav- igation. The Thor was launched 15 min- utes -before -the scheduled detona- ;ion. As it neare'd the firing alti- to be 30 to 40 miles safety officer of Joint Task Force 8 ordered the rocket de- stroyed! The -announcement said only that the tracking system mal- functioned. Radios monitoring the count- down picked up the Thor launch at a.m., EST. Then, with one minute and 40 seconds left, a voice was heard shouting "nega- tive, negative, negative." There was no further word. There had been two hours of de- lays before launching of the planned sub-megaton, .blast. A megaton is equal to one million tons of TNT. -The failure followed two 24-hour postponements of the the first of three or four blasts in the current Pacific series. The postponements were not .officially explained but reports in Honolulu blamed cloudy weather and possi- ble technical difficulties. Joint Task.Force 8.had no word on when.another shot will be at- tempted. "They want- to analyze this one before they say anything a spokesman said. The United States went ahead .with the.shot despite a Soviet gov- ernment charge from Moscow Sunday that the test would "carry the nuclear arms race into outer space." The Moscow complaint said the high-altitude-blast could disrupt communications, endanger future astronaut flights and "change the weather." A spokesman for Joint Task Force 8 said, "let them complain. They know more about, these tests than we do. That's what we're trying-to find out." OKLAHOMA Partly cloudy this afternoon, widely, scattered later afternoon and night time a little warmer this afternoon and tonight; low-tonight 53 Pan- handle to <8 cut and south; high Tuesday M-B- Cool pleasant temperatures blanketed Ada Sunday. The high temperature. In Ada 76 de- greei after a. Saturday night low of 63; reading at 7 a. m. was IS   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication