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Ada Evening News Newspaper Archive: June 1, 1962 - Page 1

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   Ada Evening News, The (Newspaper) - June 1, 1962, Ada, Oklahoma                             COW AWEIGH Suiit, ptrpltxtd 300-pound Holitein, it lowtrtd from itop Cwtltbtrry High School in Fort Worth, TtX., ifttr becoming tntangltd in lomt tetn-agt end-of- (chool hi.jinki. Sht tmtrgtd unhirmed. (AP JFK's Interest Spurs Probers DALLAS, Tex. (AP) Presi- dent Kennedy's interest in the case is spurring an FBI investigation of the mysterious death of an Agriculture Department official who pried into the affairs of Billie Sol Estes, the Dallas News re- ported today. A Texas grand jury also is look- Ing into the shooting of Henry H. Marshall, 52. found dead on his farm near'Franklin Tex., a year ago. The body was exhumed and a pathologist said Marshall pro- bably was murdered. At the time of his death, a justice of the peace decided it was suicide. In a copyright story, the Dallas News said the President's person- al interest prompted ,his brother, Atty. Gen. Robert F. Kennedy, to order the FBI to step up its in- vestigation. Marshall was shot five times. A bolt action..22 caliber rifle was found near the body. At the time of his death, he .transfers of cot- ton allotments by Estes, the.Pe- cos, Tex., financier who has been indicted on fraud and 'theft charges. Estes business interests involving millions liquid fertili- zer sales, elevators collecting huge sums from the government for storing surplus grain, and ex- tensive farms have been placed in the hands of a receiver. In addition, House and Senate committees are investigating charges that Estes distributed cash and expensive gifts to win preferential treatment by govern- ment officials. "If it could be proved conclu- sively that Marshall was a sui- cide; or that, if he was mur- dered, it had nothing to do with the Estes case, the political pres- sure against the Democrats would be said the News. A hardware store clerk at Franklin, Smith, told the Houston Chronicle Thursday she sold Marshall a box of .22 cart- ridges the day he was shot. "He just came in and told me what he Mrs, Smith said. "I remember his handing me a dollar." Sybil Marshall, the said she believed Mrs. Smith was. mis- taken. "I'm. pretty sure he didn't be- cause he had shells in his bed- room which I found Mrs. Marshall said, "and I know he always kept shells in his pick-, THE EVENING NEWS 59TH YEAR NO 69 ADA, OKLAHOMA, FRIDAY, JUNE 1, 1962 10 Pages 5 CENTS WEEKDAY, 10 CENTS SUNDAY Groovy! Red Square's Not Square Any More MOSCOW Good- man blew his black clarinet under the walls of the Kremlin today in one of the wierdest jazz sessions Red Square has ever not the first. Goodman lifted his-instrument in the air near the candy twist turrets of St. Basils Cathedral and played "Yankee Doodle Dan- dy." He was a long way from Lenin's tomb, which also is in the square, so 300 or 400 Muscovites OKLAHOMA Mostly cloudy this afternoon, tonight and Sat- urday; occasional showers and scattered thunderstorms cen- tral portion this afternoon and east tonight; cooler this after- noon and locally cooler tonight and west and north portions; low tonight 50 northwest to 65 southeast; high Saturday 65-75. High temperature In Ada Thursday was 85; low Thursday night, 62; reading at 7 a: m. Friday, 63. Rainfall during the period ending at 7 a. m. Friday was ,53 inch. clustered around didn't take it amiss. "He then played "Midnight in known in these parts as "Moscow Evening." At that moment a trio of guards who had been relieved of their turn at watching over the Lenin tomb, marched past. As they turned into the Kremlin gate, Goodman played a little melody known as "Pop Goes the Weasel." It was all part of. a day in which the American jazzman promised ,to join Soviet jazzmen in a jam session when-he returns to Moscow early in July after a tour out in the provinces. Goodman also got a-promise from one of the Soviet Union's i leading composers, Aram Khacha- 'turyan, to do a piece for the Goodman orchestra. The thing developed at a .lunch where Goodman was a guest of Soviet "How about a piece for the .or- Goodman demanded of Khachaturyan. "I have been dreaming of be- ing able to 'do something .like the composer said, -and added that he could construct it around a clarinet, such as Good- Rusk Plans Talks With U.S. Allies Secretary To Seek Clarification Of NATO, Policy Split WASHINGTON (AP) Secre- tary 'of State Dean Rusk is plan- ning a trip to Europe late this month' to confer with allied lead- ers about clearing up some of the policy splits in the Atlantic Alli- ance, i He is' expected definitely to meet'with West German Chancel- lor Konrad Adenauer. He may see French President Charles de Gaulle and British Prime Minis- ter Harold Macmrilan. Rusk .confirmed to a news con- ference Thursday that arrange- ments for a trip are being worked out. From other sources it was learned that he wants to talk to Adenauer about U.S.-Soviet discus- sions on a Berlin settlement and about future moves for greater Western European political unity, which the United States strongly supports. Whether Rusk sees De Gaulle probably will be determined by progress in his conferences here with French Ambassador Herve Alphand. Rusk and.Alphand met for two hours Monday and for 90 minutes Thursday on Paris-Wash- ington policy differences. They ap- parently have no'hope at present of ending major differences over De Gaulle's determination to give France an independent nuclear i weapons force and his desire, to i promote a European grouping of I national states with looser U.S. tics. Rusk reasserted at his news conference that the United States is completely opposed to the De Gaulle plan for a French nuclear force.-In response to.a specific question he said the United States would not favor- Britain's supply- ing nuclear weapons to France. Rusk also challenged critics 'of administration foreign policy to come up with'proposals for alter- native lines of-policy development if 'they'really "believe th'afthe'ad- ministration is following a no win- course. Sen. Barry Goldwater, has accused the. government- of having a "no win" policy in the cold war. Rusk rejected the charge but said "there is: one- point on which we do have to show some caution and that is the notion that victory in its usual sense is to be achieved by sudden military means." He declared that the .United States is promoting development of the Atlantic community, build- ing up its alliances, trying 'to ex- pand trade, assisting countries in need and strengthening the .soli- darity of the Free World. On other foreign policy ques- tions, Rusk: ,1. Rejected Soviet Premier i Khrushchev's call for a worldwide 'conference to .form-some new trade organization as an alterna- tive to the development of the European Common Market. Rusk (Continutd on Pigt Two) Humphrey Asks Action In Beefing Nation's Economy ed-battle for-the Democratic nom- ranks.against Republicans. Atkinson'was officially declared the Democratic .nomina- (Continutd on Pigt Two) A.C.T. Stages "Award" Night The annual patron's party and awards, the Ada Community Theatre .will be staged tonight at the Aldridge Hotel ballroom. The A.C.T. party gets under- way at 8 n. m. Included on the program will be the A.C.T. "Ada" awards to various members the organization who have per- formed during the past year In one or more of the group's Plays.-.., Also on tap is a meeting of the A.C.T. trustees. SEARCH FOR WRECK VICTIMS Rtieut uit liddtriii thty itirch tht wrtck- .g. of two train.'involved in colliiion neir Milin, Italy- A frt.ght train hit .tindmg txpren train jammed with vicationtri. At I tut 44 piistngtrx photo via Radio from .______ wtrt killtd. (AP Wirt- Atkinson Urges In Democratic Ranks OKLAHOMA CITY. emerge, a ,449 vote winner in the Bill Atkinson climaxed an extend- May 22nd primary runoff. act He joined asking for recount of the ballots 'the-, .state.--- The recount "of ballots moved cast: ceded "I tion by a 954 vote -margin over former Raymond Gary one month after Oklahomans first voted m 'the'.Democratic'.primary. Gary led Atkinson'by more than. votes at the end of the May 1 primary, but Atkinson rallied during the runoff campaign, to -halt, in Tuesday.night in a mix-up that left election officials in a pub- lic fuss. Atkinson' picked' up votes from the start Monday of the which moved briskly ..through Gary refused to concede -until all but a few- votes be' a citizen -andj.-a then .good Gary was bidding to, become the first .governor to serve more than one term, in-the state's history. He was defeated" in' the closesl governor's held in the Heavy Rain Hits State; More Due On Weekend Rains ranging up to 5.30 inches fell'; across- Oklahoma 'Thursday night -and forecasters said die state could expect more moisture during the coming. weekend. Most of the heavier rainfall re- ports cam'e 'from southern Okla- homa, although Beaver in the Panhandle had 2.73 inches for the 24'hours, ending at 6 a.m. today; In extreme south. central Okla- homa, Madill had 5.30 inches, Kingston ,4.62 and Ardmore 4.40. In the same area, Tishomingo re- ported 3.53 inches -and Sulphur 2.34. 'The'west and southwest 'where dry weather earlier'had matured the state's wheat crop'ahead of had some good rains overnight. Altus reported 1.50 inches, Woodward -1.79 and Fargo 1.26. Most other points over "the' state had .-a half-inch or more 'of moisture. Low temperatures overnight ranged from 55 at Guymon to at Ponca .City, Highs Thursday were from 84 "at 'Ft. 'Sill to 91 at Gage. The 5-day forecast-called for more scattered thunderstorms, mostly .during .the first part of next week with amounts ranging from .10 to .50 inch in .the-west to .50 to 1.50 inches in the east. D. D. Pittman, U. S. Depart- ment -of Agriculture statistician for -said the rains which started last week put.'Okla- homa-farmers "back in the run- ning again." Pittman said the moisture re- lieved the drought situation which was developing, but it could de- velop again unless more rain comes. Pittman added'he prefer- red" to .-call "the'situation prior to in Oklahoma. County 'remained to be recounted. When the former-, governor con state. Smiling' and relaxed, Atkinson issued a victory statement and answered questions from .news men Thursday before 'huddling with Democratic officials to map a "close ranks" effort He met with Gene Democratic chairman; and Sen. Roy Boecher, the- choice for Senate president. pro tempore. He said he would meet later .with McGill and" Rep. .J.D. McCarty, the, designate for speak- er of the House. "We- haver'just been going over background 'and they have been bringing me up-to date on .a num- ber of-.things I need to Atkinson said after his meeting Atkinson faces Republican 'Hen- ry Bellm'on, a' Red Rock farmer, in November. "We, of course, would expect a run .the He hard fight and we will said Atkinson.. .of pending November battle, added: "Gov, Gary, m the wyv, yrciiv, in uic iiuc -uaui- last week a-prolonged dry spell of Democnltic party, has rather- than a drought. pledged his support .of .the Demo- Another inch or two of rainfall P fnr over the state in the next 10 days: i cratic ticket in the- fall and -for would put-soil conditions in-go< shape again.'He pointed out thai plenty of moisture during the past winter provided good.subsoil.mois- ture and prevented more serious; effects on Oklahoma pasture's and crops. he said if the dry spell had continued another two or row crops would have been-hurt. I am "Oklahoma's greatest'need'to of purpose in all fronts. As Democratic nominee or as gov- ernor this shall be my. constant effort." Before the start of the recount, Atkinson predicted he would have (Continutd on. Pigt Two) Minnesota Senator Calls For Cuts In Individual And Corporate Income Tax WASHINGTON (AP) Sen. .Hubert H. Humphrey, D-Minn., today urged a cut in individual and corporate income taxes "to strengthen the economy and the stock market." "It will take more than expressions of friendship and cooperation from the White House and other areas of government to strengthen the Humphrey said in a statement. "What is needed he said. "Delay by Con- gress or the administration will bring further economic ---------------------------------trouble." The Assistant Senate Democrat- ic leader, who talked Thursday in New-York with stock exchange officials and other financial lead-' ers, proposed cuts of 2 to 4 per cent in corporation. levies and 2 .in personal taxes. Probe Asked Meanwhile, the recent gyrations Oklahoma's Is Going Good Oklahoma's general business level pushed up again in April to a new high, the University of- Oklahoma 'Bureau of Susiness Research reports. The bureau said business activ- ty in Oklahoma in April stood at 128 per cent of. the 1957-59 aver- age, a gain of .8 per cent over March and 9.5 per cent higher than in April of last year. Vol- ume of business for the first four months of .this year was 7.9 per cent above the same period of last year. The upsurge in state business S been in contrast to the na- tional trend, the report said. Busi- ness has been off slightly nation- wide since reaching a peak in Feb- ruary. The- OU research agency said the manner in .which .business, ac- tivity h'a.s: increased in Oklahoma in recent months.is as encourag- ing, as "The basic .gen- erally expanded and this las pro- vided a floor'for general the bureau report 'said. "Mineral-.output has -been .partic- ularly outstanding sic industries with an increase of 16.5 per cent since last December. Manufacturing has increased, ir- regularly .but definitely while ag- ricultural production has held its own'.this year. These trends have been supported by an unexpected- ly large upsurge in construction." The level of employment in Oklahoma increased again in April with a total persons, em- ployed, 2 per, cent more. than -in Democratic March and' the best April on rec- Unemployment dropped 10.8 per.cent to lowest level in the past 18 -months. -The bureau-said the gain in em- ployment resulted primarily from an increase of in agricul- tural employment, raising the to- (Continutd on Pigt Two) Come On In; The Water's Free Sunday Everybody gets a free dip on Sunday. The city's three swimming pools open at 2 p.m. ..Sunday and, as usual, the first day's swimming Is on the house. On Sunday, the pools will be open from 2 p.m. until 6.p.m. On other days in the week, they will open at p.m. and "remain open until 9 p.m. Tom Erwin "is manager at "the pool in Wintersmith Park. :Jim Powers is in charge at Glenwood. Tom English' directs activities at the Northside pool. of the stock market prompted Rep. Wright Patman, chairman of the Senate-House Economic.Com-; mittee, to ask Congress to ap- prove a investigation of :he market by the House Banking and Currency Committee. "Congress .ought to know what influences the stock market -and how- these influences -affect the health .of the business and credit said the Texas Demo- crat- Tuesday's surging rally of the New York Stock Exchange con- tinued Thursday and over the two days an estimated billion was added to the quoted -value of listed stocks. This more than' made "up Monday's loss. No Support Found Secretary of'the Treasury Doug- las Dillon House Ways and Means the-' -administration was not sup- porting any immediate income tax cut' -The Treasury has said, how- ever, that, such cuts probably will be proposed.next.year, as a part of 'a tax overhaul .measure which will include some provisions to increase revenues in other ways. Humphrey proposed' the tax cuts in a four-point program in which he also called for: Commitment Asked I.' A. commitment by govern- ment and private industry that unemployment will be.reduced to not more than 4 per cent of-the work force. The rate now is 5.4 per cent. 2. A stepped-up and expanded public works 'program placed into operation at once. (Continutd on Two) HUBERT HUMPHREY Senate Group Seeks Accord On Tax Plan WASHINGTOJ (AP) Admin- istration supporters in the Senate are proposing a compromise plan to try to save the bitterly dis- puted plan .to withhold taxes on income from dividends and in- terest. The disclosed to- day by Senate Finance Committee members, .would .exempt from withholding -persons with incomes of- or. less.- One senator said'Tie understood 87-Year-Old Train Victim Clings To Life An 87-year-old Atoka man, struck by" a train about noon Thursday, was. listed in "critical" condition at Valley View Hospital this morning. William Love, according to rail- road employes, -was walking north on the, Katy tracks at Atoka when the northbound'-'noon train came into the station and .struck him from'behind. The train was slowing for its regular stop at ;.the station, but was unable to stop completely in time to avoid hitting Love. Love .was knocked down but not run over. 'Hospital authorities said this morning he :sustained a fractured arm, fractured, ribs and possible internal injuries in the accident. endorsement of the 'Treasury. However, it was'learned hat it has not won over .the committee chairman, Harry F. Byrd, D-Va., who has announced his opposition to. the withholding.'plan. !'Byrd, it was understood, feels any compromise 'would be de- signed to get the'principle of with- holding through the Seriate, with the idea that the original plan- might be restored in conference with the House...... The' House included President Kennedy's-- withholding recom- mendation in the tax revision bill it passed; in March. The Finance Committee has held -lengthy hearings on the measure, but has not reached any decisions. Senators have been deluged with' thousands of letters from in- vestors and savers opposing the withholding feature- Backers of the President came up with the exemption pro- posal after it became obvious that Byrd probably would win in a fight to knock out the feature' in the committee. All six Republican members are expected to vote with Byrd. In addition, Sens. Russell B. Long, D-La., and George A. Smathers, have notified constituents that they oppose'the, pro vision as written-in the house bill. (Continued on Pagt Two) "We're giving you a raise, said the boss, "be- cause we want your last week here to be a happy-one." (Copr. Gen. Fea.'Corp.) Still Defiant Eichmann Walks Calmly To Gallows TEL AVIV, Israel fiant to the end, Adolf Eictimann walked firmly to the gallows Thursday night and paid with his life for his role in Nazi Germany's systematic extermination of 6 mil- lion European Jews. The young state of Israel hanged the former Gestapo co ncl at two minutes before mid- night on an improvised scaffold in a third-story storeroom of Ramleh Prison near Tel Aviv. It was the first execution in the 14-year history of this Jewish na-, tion which counts among its citi- zens thousands of relatives of Jews whom Eichmann, 56, helped speed to death in Hitler's gas chambers. Eichmann's body was cremated quickly and the ashes scattered upon the. waters of the Mediter- ranean. Eichmann was cool and unre- pentant as this Jewish nation car- ried to conclusion its announced determination to record the. his- tory of the Nazi pogrom and mete out justice in the name of all Jews. A faint smile on his face, Eich- mann spurned the traditional black hood and even< chided his jailers for making it difficult for him .to stand on the gallows' trap door. "My belief was 'the former head of the Gestapo Jew- ish affairs section .declared. "I had to obey the rules of war .and my flag. I am ready." a command 'from an Israeli guard, .Eichmann, stepped to the trap door and lunged to his death almost in a single motion. Death was instantaneous, prison officials said. f Eichmann was condemned to death last December by a special three-judge tribunal which found him guilty of acts of unparalleled enormity -against the Jewish pep; pie and against only crime subject to capital pun- ishment'in'Israel. The balding; bespectacled Hitler disciple had.rinsisted he was-only a minor cog carrying out'orders from above in the Nazi campaign for "the the'Jew- ish But the court declared he ac- tually, relished shipping Jews to their "deaths by the hundreds' of saying he was .moti; vated by desire'to blot out an entire people from the face, of the earth." The Israeli Supreme Court re- jected Eichmann's. appeal "against the death sentence Tuesday, de- claring even death was an inade- quate penalty. And with unexpected speed, President. Izhak Ben-Zvi sealed I jection of the clemency Eichmann's doom, about noon I but not that .he was-, to die-that Thursday, rejecting -appeals for for executive clemency, from Eich- mann, members of his family and others. Eichmann was transferred quickly from his cell in. Jerusa- lem, where of red wine. He-drank -thick'.fog. :s'et- in. Guards flood'lights.and police set up roadblocks: to divert traffic" from the former sli Aviv-Jeru-. for' the Supreme ,'Court to-. spiritual adviser, The Rev. Wil- liam Hull, visited him in his cell. The, Canada-bom clergyman :later. that Eichmann was sad-'tut 'was Eichmann.''-'who1 earlier had-expressed a belief in God but belonged to no church, refused to reaffirm. in "I do, not have time-to .read the Eichmann told -the minis- ter. "I have.peace'in.my'heart.. I am ready- to die." Eichmann was told of the re- Eichmann learned death was- at haiid -only when guards, cam'e to his" the .50 yards to walked steadily to ;thY execution to -tworgukrds. Be made'only, one stop -and .blow his nose. Dressed fa brown .slacks and 'a brown shirt open at-the neck, he mounted'the scaffold by a single step and stood' directly under- the npo.se -which was. suspended 'over his head on a chain. His -hands and ankles were bound with white cloth. As the noose was fitted over his Eichmann half closed his eyes and looked downward at the floor. As the black preferred, Eichmann don't need Eichmann spoke his last-words to a small :group' of officials, guards and newsmen gathered-to witness the execution! "My, .belief Was he .a. short .-while, gentle-- men, .we.shall-.'all meet. again. So" is- the fate .'of: all men.- I have lived believing in God and I die believing in God.; "Long 'live .Germany. Long live Argentina. Long live Austria. These countries-! with which -I have: been most, closely associated and- I shall.not'forget them. I greet my'wife, my family! and my friends. I had to obey the rules of war and my flag. I am ready." the father of..four was bornUn Germany and hid out (after World in Vera; was the only-member of-his family to see Moments'. ore Eichmann stepped Thursday night on the blacks-square', the... trap guarid iwo'rd. for and; Elchmaim view.. repeated .The Rev.; Mr.'Hull, the 'only -clergy- man .present The 'Israeli government issued a terse .communique: "Adolf Eichmann was executed tly hanging today in accordance with the sentence of death passed by the Jerusalem District Court on Dec. 15, 1961. "The appeal having been dis- missed by ,the Supreme Court on May 29, and the minister: of justice having 'that: the president has'decided not to exer- cise his prerogative 'of clemency, the hanging was. carried out.. Later the government an- nounced: "The remains of Adolf Eich- mann were cremated today at a.m. on board an Israel police boat and the ashes scat- tered-on the high seas.: similar .procedure'was fol- lowed- with the remains of the 'The-bodyj.was _examined-by a Nazi war criminals executed by government physician who pro- nounced life to be extinct at 2358 hours "The. execution -was -witnessed by superintendent: of .prisons, a government 'two po- lice ..officers who -wereupresentvin the was to 'identify- Eich- irianV as .was condemned to .death, and a clergy- man of the Protestant 'faith. TWO. representatives" of the local press and two -representatives foreign" press were present." 'order of the Nuernberg Interna- tional Tribunal. "Adolf Eichmann's will includes a request that his remains be cremated." ;Eichznann went to his 'death 2 years) and 21 days commandos captured him. in AT-. and smuggled him to Israel by'air, ending a world-wide search, by Jewish agents that be- gan on: the- smoldering ashes of the Nazi empire. (Continutd oh   

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